Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: website

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to websites.

2017: The Year of Encryption Everywhere (Infographic)

Security is far from a “rising trend” in 2017 — it’s a fact that has now ruled the internet for years and is not going anywhere. One thing we can be certain of is that as hackers get more sophisticated, so too must our security, and specifically encryption.

According to this infographic from the SSLShop, 2017 is going to see the most encryption yet, due to a number of factors, including Google’s upcoming browser features. If you’re involved in any website or security projects, have a look to see what you can expect in the coming months. Is there anything you can add or would reject from the list?

2017 The Year Of Encryption Everywhere #Infographic

100 Web Design Tools that Anyone Can Use (Infographic)

Personal branding should never be taken lightly by any IT professional. Depending on your region and your skill, there are often hundreds of other independent contractors out there who you compete against for work. You need to stand out to recruiters and employment agencies as their top choice and, when you interview with a recruiter or client, you need to leave the best impression. One element of personal branding that we’ve discussed throughout the Talent Development Centre is your online presence and, more specifically, creating a personal website.

To create the perfect personal brand for yourself as an independent IT contractor, you may want a specific look and feel on your website. Unless you’re a designer or find the perfect template, that exact image could be tricky to attain. Instead, have a look at this infographic from Illustrio which gives dozens of  helpful tools (some even free) that will help you design the perfect website.

100 Web Design Tools that Anyone Can Use (Infographic)

The Biggest Business Website Fails and How to Fix Them

This post by Susan Johnston Taylor was originally published on the Freshbooks Blog on July 19, 2016

The Biggest Business Website Fails and How to Fix ThemNowadays customers expect small businesses—everything from solo practitioners to mom and pop contracting companies—to have an online presence. With free and inexpensive tools available online, you don’t need to be a website wizard to set one up.

Despite the relative ease of setting up a website, there are several potential pitfalls that could turn away customers rather than draw them in—by “draw them in,” we mean drive business conversions from your mere online presence. Here’s a look at several business website faux pas, along with tips on how to fix them.

It’s Jargon-Heavy

Some businesses use very technical language or industry jargon to describe themselves and what they do. Avoid this temptation and keep the language as simple and digestible as possible. Instead of saying “We leverage industry-leading, best-in-class pest-mitigation techniques,” choose simpler language like “We’ll rid your home of ants, cockroaches and other pests.” The latter also focuses on the benefits the customer will enjoy: a pest-free home!

It has the Wrong Focus

Your website shouldn’t just trumpet your accomplishments and certifications; it should demonstrate how you can help your potential customers. Rather than focusing on your extensive list of credentials, focus on the people-aspect of your business.

What are their pain points? What unique benefits can you offer that will make their lives easier or better? How can you speak their language and show that you understand their needs?

It’s Missing a Call-to-Action

Don’t make site visitors guess what they should do next; give them clear instructions with an obvious call to action button or hyperlinked text. For instance, encourage them to download your free ebook, book a free consultation or contact you for more information. Without these prompts, your potential customers won’t be prompted to move forward with your services, and you won’t get the business conversions you’re looking for.

It’s Not Mobile-Friendly

The number of global mobile users now surpasses the number of desktop users, according to comScore. If your website isn’t mobile-friendly, you could be missing out on potential business. If you have animation, large images that contain text or a site navigation that isn’t responsive on mobile phones and tablets, that can frustrate potential customers. Particularly in today’s mobile-driven world, you should have a mobile-first approach when building your website.

It has a Confusing User-Experience

Your site’s navigation should make it easy for users to find what they need, whether it’s a list of services, business hours, staff bios or contact pages—all within a few intuitive clicks. If it’s too hard to contact you, they’ll be apt to look elsewhere and you can lose their business.

Consider including a contact page as part of your site’s primary navigation and posting your phone number in a prominent place on every single page (the footer of the web page is typically where your traffic will look to for site navigation). If you provide useful and accessible information, it can also reduce the number of phone calls asking for basics like business hours or whether you provide a certain service.

It has Looping Background Music

Websites that start playing music automatically (and non-stop) as soon as you load the page can annoy your customers. They may be browsing your site at work or another place where loud, unexpected music is disruptive. In addition, added features—like music—can lead to slower loading times throughout your website. So instead of using music to set the mood, visually capture your audience instead. Choose images, fonts and colors to illustrate your desired brand and vibe.

It has Poor Image Quality

Blurry or pixelated images scream amateur hour. Smartphone cameras have come a long way, but if you still can’t get high enough resolution images, consider investing the money in professional photography or at least locating some royalty-free stock images for your site. And if you decide to take your own photography, images taken on a smartphone are typically suitable enough for website quality.

It has a Hard-to-Read Typeface

You want your site’s text to be readable on desktop or mobile so visitors can easily gather the information they need. Dark text on a light background is generally easiest to read, while light text on a dark background can prove trickier. Colors can display differently on varying devices depending on their screen settings, so aim for contrast. Different shades of the same color (for instance, a light pink background with darker pink text) may not read as well. If your traffic is distracted by your font style and color from the get-go, they may not even give your services a chance.

It’s Visually Cluttered

Big blocks of text and lots of images can overwhelm website visitors and detract them from your content. Use subheadings and bullet points as appropriate to make your text more readable and easy-to-follow. Also, include white space to give your text and images room to breathe. White space around your call-to-actions can also help them stand out. Here are instructions on finding your site’s text/HTML ratio.

It has an Outdated Template

Make sure you update your website on a regular basis. If customers come to your site in April and you still have a banner ad for a holiday sale, it doesn’t leave the best first impression. Make a more positive impression by regularly updating your website and removing any time-sensitive promotions as appropriate.

Also, keep an eye out for broken links. If you link to a vendor who goes out of business or you change the navigation on your own site, ensure you remove old links so that visitors won’t be redirected to a 404 page.

By keeping your target customers’ needs in mind and providing a good online user experience, your website will make a strong impression for your business and will allow customers to look up your information anytime, anywhere.

About the Author: Freelance journalist Susan Johnston Taylor covers entrepreneurship, small business and lifestyle for publications including The Boston Globe, Wall Street Journal, Entrepreneur and FastCompany.com. Follow her on Twitter@UrbanMuseWriter.

14 Web Design Predictions for 2016 (Infographic)

Are you involved in any web design projects? Do you manage your own personal website? Or are you simply interested in the latest trends? Either way, take a detailed look at this infographic from Thinkdesign, the Logo Design Guru blog. It highlights 14 trends that we can expect to see in web design in the New Year. What do you think? Are we going to start seeing more Asteroid-themed websites?

Web Design Trends

 

 

4 Things to Help You Build Your Personal Website

In a recent article on Inc.com, Meredith Fineman, founder of FinePoint, explained her views on personal websites and why she believes every professional, regardless of their career level, should invest into building one.  We’ve touched on professional websites before on the Talent Development Centre, and couldn’t agree more with Meredith.   Here are four fantastic tips and tricks she provides:

Control

There is only so much you can control online, particularly when it comes to your name and profile. There are things you can barely control (like a person whose name is close to yours who happens to have great SEO), and some you can, like LinkedIn. However, with platforms like LinkedIn, you’re still limited to their layout, their buttons, their prompts. You can’t edit the code on your Facebook page, and so, by having your own website, you are in 100 percent control of the conversation surrounding you. And that’s nearly the only time that happens.

Not only are you in control but you are able to show your personality, character, color, Contractor building a websiteanimation, video, audio–not to mention accolades–and they’re all displayed, in a way that is unique to you. Think about your professional goals–and then about what you can put on your page to highlight why and how you can get there.

Personal websites get people jobs. I hired someone flat out because of her website (it was a play on Beyonce’s, so I just had to).

The technicalities

There are a ton of easy-to-use platforms–such as Wix, Weebly, or WordPress–for creating a personal site. All of these services are free (at least at the basic level), and make producing your website a lot easier than it looks. This is the biggest reason, clients tell me, that they don’t have their own websites–fear of the technical aspects. But it’s just not that hard. You can also hire great designers, but for the first version you can always play with looks and layouts on your own with one of these programs.

Ten years ago I interviewed for an internship at a PR firm, and I remember the CEO saying, “If you don’t remember anything else, at least buy the domain of your name.” (I guess I didn’t remember much else, but I did remember that.) Buy every iteration–.co, .org, .me. You never know what will happen: Someone with a name similar to yours could become famous (for good or bad), or someone could potentially harm your online reputation by using your name in a URL.

Keeping track

Having a personal website means you can also use it for your own purposes, not just to show others who you are. A personal website can house and track interesting projects you’re working on and media mentions of you or your company, or it can keep all of your writing in one place. I use my site as a database for everything I’ve written in the past nine years, as well as everything that has been written about me. This is easy for business development emails, but it also allows you to really take a look over the work that you’ve done. All in one spot. Whenever I write something new, I immediately put it on the site. By making that a common practice, I don’t have to try to remember pieces I wrote five years ago.

Show, don’t tell

You can talk yourself blue in the face about a work experience, but nothing proves in an interview or meeting that you know how to produce a great video like one you created that someone can link to, send around, or watch to see what your skillset is like. A personal website isn’t restricted to pieces written and accolades, but can also display your side interests, hobbies, photos, and more.

It’s all about creating the conversation, versus having to control and change the discussion. A personal website is the easiest way to assert who you are, and to display it.