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All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to technology trends.

IT Industry News for March 2018


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on April 4th, 2018.

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for February 2018. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of March in previous years …

In March 2013 Oracle continued its move into the telco space with the purchase of Tekelec; Google bought the small Toronto University-based company DNNresearch in the machine learning vertical; Microsoft sold Atlas Advertiser Suite to Facebook; and Yahoo bought Summly. In March 2014, Facebook made a somewhat surprising $2 billion acquisition of virtual reality company Oculus VR. Intel also expanded its horizons with the $150 million acquisition of smart watch maker, Basis Science. SAP added to its purchasing software suite with the acquisition of Fieldglass and TELUS made a couple of buys, Enode, a management consulting company out of Quebec and Med Access, an addition in British Columbia, to their healthcare division.  HP logoThree years ago in March 2015 HP paid $3 billion for Aruba Networks; Lexmark paid $1 billion for customer management software company Kofax; eCommerce company Rakuten paid $410 million for ebook marketplace Overdrive; Cheetah Mobile paid $58 million for mobile ad network MobPartner; TeraGo Networks paid $33 million for cloud provider RackForce; IBM bought natural language and image processing company AlchemyAPI; and in the cable TV world Charter Communications paid $10.4 billion for dell logoBright House Networks. In March 2016, we saw the $3 billion sale of Dell Services to NTT, a direct result of Dell’s restructuring following the recent purchase of EMC. IBM was out bolstering its services business with a couple of acquisitions; the first was Optevia, a UK-based integrator focused on Microsoft Dynamics; and the second was Bluewolf Group, a global Salesforce consulting partner. Montreal-based Yellow Pages picked up Toronto-based Juice Mobile, primarily for its mobile marketing capability. Another Toronto company, Influitive, raised some cash ($8.2 million) and bought a couple of mobile app companies, Ironark Software and Triggerfox; and Netsuite bought IOity solutions, a cloud-Intel logobased manufacturing software company.  Last year in March 2017 Intel bought Israeli computer vision company, Mobileye, for a hefty $15.3 billion. HPE bought storage solution provider, Nimble, for $1 billion. Amazon Web Services, a public cloud infrastructure provider, acquired Thinkbox Software, a company that provides software for managing media rendering workloads. Mozilla acquired Pocket, a startup that developed an app for saving articles and other content.

Which brings us back to the present …

Salesforce logoIn March 2018, there was a significant amount of M&A activity.  The deal of the month saw Salesforce pay $6.5 Billion for cloud integration company Mulesoft.  Plantronics is paying $2 Billion for unified communications company Polycom; and Amazon is paying $1 Billion for smart home company Ring.  Other deals saw eBay shell out $700 million for the commerce platform Qoo10; Cognizant is buying Bolder Healthcare Solutions; HPE Aruba is buying Cape Networks; VMWare is buying security company E8; and Deloitte is buying API Talent in New Zealand.  It is also nice to see Avaya buying Spoken Communications after leaving Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Facebook logoFacebook received a lot of attention around the world this month with questions about improper use of client data and their potential role in major political situations like the US election and the Brexit vote.

The Canadian economy has enjoyed a reasonably decent run in 2017, but 2018 is starting to look less than rosy.  Indications are that GDP and employment growth will slow down as the year progresses.  Obviously NAFTA negotiations and inter-provincial spats will have some influence, in addition to new labor laws and the carbon taxes beginning to take effect.  The US economy is benefiting from the recent tax decreases and the general tone around the world is focused more on positive employment numbers and skills shortages rather than high unemployment.

That is my monthly look at what was happening in the technology space over the last month, compared to the same month in previous years.  I’ll be back in about a month’s time, until then … walk fast and smile!

The Mobile Trends We Can Expect to See in 2018


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Nowadays we’re always on the go and our phones have become a “must-have” device to stay connected. We search for anything on it from restaurant menus to how-to videos, the possibilities have become endless. But have you ever had the problem of pages not loading or of having no ability to zoom. It’s a major issue that has become prominent in today’s tech trends.

By showing how mobile optimization and AI will no longer just be trends for the distant future, Bizness Apps latest infographic reveals just how much we rely on our mobile devices.  See how even today, the tech world is making advancements to make mobile experiences more user friendly.

9 Mobile Trends You Need to Know for 2018

IT Industry News for January 2018


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on February 11th, 2018.

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for January 2018. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Januarys

Five years ago, in January 2013 Cisco bought mobile network software company Intucell for $475 million and sold its Linksys division to Belkin.  The biggest dollar value deal was AT&T’s purchase of some of Verison Wireless’s airwaves for $1.9 Billion.  Other deals saw NCR buy video software ASTM company uGenius Technology; Canon Canada acquired long-time partner and document management company Oce Canada; NetSuite bought retail management systems company Retail Anywhere; and AVI-SPL bought Duocom-Duologik.  January 2014 was an interesting month with a few big M&A deals.  Google was an especially busy player, selling its Motorola Mobility handset unit to Lenovo for $2.9 billion but paying $3.2 billion for Nest Labs and the company also bought Bitspin.  The other big deal saw VMware pay $1.17 billion for mobile device management company AirWatch.  Other big names on the acquisition trail included Oracle who bought cloud based service delivery company Corente; Microsoft paid a reputed $100 million for cloud based service company (seems to be a theme) Parature; Ricoh purchased IT service company Mindshift from BestBuy; and Hootsuite bought analytics company uberVu. Three Yahoo logoyears ago in January 2015, the biggest deal was Hutchison offering more than $14 billion for O2. Other big dollar news saw Yahoo looking like it might be remaking itself, spinning off its $40 Billion stake in Alibaba to become smaller, leaner and either buy or be bought!  The final M&A activity involving a “B” was Telco equipment company Commscope offering $3 billion for TE Connectivities network business.  There were also a number of very well-known companies out buying, and in no particular order … Amazon paid something like $300 million (approximate) for chip designer Annapurna Labs; Expedia bought its online travel competitor Travelocity for $200 million; Samsung paid $100 million for Brazil’s largest print company Simpress; Google paid about $100 million for mobile payments company Softcard; Facebook bought Wit.ai a company that has a Siri like solution that can be embedded in other products; Dropbox bought CloudOn a document editing and productivity tools company; Twitter paid somewhere between $30 million and $40 million for Zipdial, an Indian company that does some funky marketing thing with phone hang ups; and finally Microsoft made two acquisitions, startup text analytics company Equivo and in a departure from its history it bought open software company Revolution Analytics. There were no huge deals in IBM logoJanuary 2016, but there was plenty of activity with some of the household names out shopping.  IBM bought video service provider Ustream; Microsoft bought game form learning tool MinecraftEdu; Apple bought “emotion recognition” company Emotient; and Oracle bought media web tracking firm AddThis.  Toshiba bought an ERP solutions company Ignify, and a number of smaller deals included Juniper Networks buying BTISystems Inc.; FireEye bought iSight partners; Acceo Solutions bought Groupe Techna and SmartPrint bought LaserCorp’s Toronto based managed print services business.  Last Cisco logoyear, in  January 2017 the multi-billion-dollar deal of the month was Cisco’s purchase of app performance management company, AppDynamics for $3.7 billion. HP Enterprise purchased data center hardware provider, SimpliVity for $650 million. Microsoft acquired Montreal-based deep learning start-up Maluuba for an undisclosed sum. Google announced plans to purchase Twitter’s mobile developer platform Fabric. Trello, the startup behind a leading task-management app was purchased by Atlassian for $425 million. CRM giant, Salesforce bought Unity&Variety to enhance its productivity app service Quip Managed Service Provider of data and database administration, Datavail, acquired Canadian IT channel leader Navantis.

Which brings us back to the present…

Amazon logoJanuary 2018 saw the continuing saga of cities bidding to win Amazon’s second headquarters, now down to 20 finalists.  The Meltdown and Spectre hardware bugs are causing major headaches for tech companies and their clients, with the potential for hackers to take advantage.

On the M&A front the big deal saw investment management software company SS&C pay $5.4 billion for financial services software company DST Systems.  Amazon Web Services increased its cybersecurity protection capabilities through the purchase of Sqrrl.  ADP bought gig economy tool WorkMarket and TD Bank bought a Canadian AI company Layer 6.

The economy is getting “interesting”.  After some good indicators in 2017 Canada lost 88,000 jobs in January.  It is likely that new labor legislation introducing tougher labor laws and increased minimum wages in Ontario and Alberta were factors.  The US numbers are still looking good adding another 234,000 jobs in January, Global CEO confidence is up and indicators around the world still seem positive.  A stock market correction in mid-January is however causing some concern.

That has been my look at the tech news for January … until next month, Walk Fast and Smile!

What Stats Canada Says About Canadians and Digital Technology


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When we reference Statistics Canada, it’s usually in regards to unemployment rates and stats around job trends that are important for any employer or job seeker to know. Of course, Stats Canada does more than track job trends. Among the many items they track, they keep a close eye on technology, where it’s going and how Canadians are interacting with it.

Towards the end of 2017, Stats Canada released this infographic discussing The Internet and Digital Technology. We can use it to draw many conclusions, although there is nothing extremely new. Canadians are continuing to use technology to improve their lives for many reasons and the younger generations are embracing it more. The infographic can pull you in further when you start reviewing the specific stats and trends about the types of devices used and their popularity, as well as the popularity of the Internet across Canadian provinces.

A Few Tech Trends for 2018


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A Few Tech Trends for 2018

As another year comes to a close, people are providing their insights and predictions to what will happen in 2018. You may have already noticed some of those articles. If not, let this be the first one you see this year!

AI Trends for 2018

Artificial Intelligence was possibly the biggest buzz word of 2017. According this Inc. article, the hype will die down, but we can also expect to see these top 5 AI trends in 2018:

  1. Natural language will replace specific commands
  2. Emotion recognition will deeply enhance the bot/human relationship
  3. AI will bring big data analytics to the masses
  4. The debate on ethics will only get more heated
  5. The hype will start to die down

Cybersecurity in 2018

Another hot topic throughout 2017 was cybersecurity and Inc. also put out an article with an outlook on that topic. Here’s a summary of what they think, based on a conversation with Steve Morgan, Founder and Editor in Chief at Cybersecurity Ventures:

  • Cybercrime will cost the world $6-trillion annually by 2021, up from about half of that figure in 2015.
  • Global spending on cybersecurity products and services will exceed $1 trillion from this year through 2021.
  • There will be 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs globally by 2021, up from 1 million positions in 2014.
  • The cybersecurity unemployment rate dropped to effectively zero percent in 2016, and is expected to remain at effectively zero through at least 2021.
  • There are 111 billion new lines of software code that need to be secured in 2017, and that figure will grow dramatically every year over the next five years.
  • Global spending on cybersecurity products and services by healthcare-related firms (which are currently the firms facing the most cyberattacks) will reach $65 billion cumulatively from 2017 through 2021.
  • Global ransomware damages will exceed $5 billion in 2017 – up 15X in just 2 years – and ransomware attacks on hospitals will quadruple by 2020.
  • The number of cybersecurity engineers and analysts in the Washington D.C. beltway area is 350% more than the rest of the United States combined.
  • Spending to train employees on security awareness will exceed $10 billion annually by 2027, up from $1 billion in 2014.
  • Wi-Fi and mobile devices will account for nearly 80 percent of IP traffic by 2025. Bring-Your-Own-Device and mobile apps will pose a major security threat to the enterprise over the next eight years.
  • People around the globe will need to secure 300 billion passwords by 2020.
  • High throughput DDoS attacks, as well as IoT botnet attacks, will force many organizations to move their IT infrastructures to the cloud by 2020.
  • Newly reported zero-day exploits will rise to one-per-day by 2021, up from one-per-week in 2015.

Gartner’s Predictions for 2018 and Beyond

Finally, in early October, Gartner release their top strategic predications for 2018 and beyond:

  1. By 2021, early adopter brands that redesign their websites to support visual and voice search will increase digital commerce revenue by 30%.
  2. By 2020, 5 of top 7 digital giants will willfully self-disrupt to create their next leadership opportunity.
  3. By the year 2020, the banking industry will derive $1B of business value from the use of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies.
  4. By 2022, the majority of individuals in mature economies will consume more false information than true information.
  5. By 2020, AI-driven creation of “counterfeit reality,” or fake content, will outpace AI’s ability to detect it, fomenting digital distrust.
  6. By 2021, more than 50% of enterprises will spend more per annum on bots and chatbot creation than traditional mobile app development.
  7. By 2021, 40% of IT staff will be “versatilists” holding multiple roles, most of which will be business- rather than technology-related.
  8. In 2020, AI will become a positive net job motivator, creating 2.3M jobs while only eliminating 1.8M jobs.
  9. By 2020, IoT technology will be in 95% of electronics for new product designs.
  10. Through 2022, half of all security budgets for IoT will go to fault remediation, recalls and safety failures rather than protection.

What predictions do you have for the future of technology?

Calgary IT Job Market Update at the end of November 2017


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By Morley Surcon (Vice President Western Canada at Eagle) and Brianne Risley (Delivery Manager at Eagle)

The following is a short summary of the IT Labour and Job Market in Calgary – supply, demand, and dynamics.

There are 3 “Trends” That Eagle has Noticed Over the Past Months:

Calgary IT Job Market UpdateCalgary has Developed an IT Skillset Gap: Information Technology changes and evolves very, very quickly. This means that what is “leading edge” today, may be “old news” in a matter of months. Over the past 18 months, Calgary companies have had a focus on sustainment. As a result, contractors have not had the opportunity to work on the technologies that are pushing the industry forward and a noticeable gap has developed between the skills available in the local Calgary IT community and the types of technology that are now starting to be requested by some organizations. Eagle is finding that in areas such as Dashboarding, SaaS, Front-end Development and Cloud development, it is difficult to find local people with the experience/knowledge in newly-in-demand technology. For example, we are now seeing demand for people with CSS/Javascript vs. the C# .NET that used to be so prevalent in the Calgary market. The same is true in the SAP space, where our customers are now looking for people with Fiori or HANA experience. We are seeing that companies are reaching out to out-of-town resources to fill these ‘niche’ skills and, in some cases, are paying elevated rates to do so. Companies may also be bringing in outsourcing companies and/or specialty partners to implement new-technology focused projects, going the way of out-sourcing or out-tasking to supply niche resources rather than running the projects in-house themselves.

Move Toward Greater Simplification:  Companies have been working towards consolidation and standardization over the past months. This encompasses both the technology that they use as well as the business partners with which they choose to work. Organizations in Calgary have shed roles over the past year(s) and must, therefore, focus on their core business/industry. It is increasingly difficult to find “the cycles” to complete projects that they do not have the in-house skills to complete. We are seeing much less custom development work in favor of their chosen ERP’s solution and/or implementing off-the-shelf software packages with little customization. And, instead of building up their own teams, more organizations have been opting to outsource or out-task project work to 3rd parties. Additionally, many of the companies in Calgary have undergone a vendor rationalization, reducing the number of suppliers/outsourcers that they deal with on a daily basis. This represents a clear shift in the quantity and types of roles for which staffing agencies are being hired and a greater degree of simplification for the companies themselves.

M&A Project Work: In Calgary, the majority of any new project work across many sectors is attributable to mergers and acquisitions. The necessity of integrating IT departments, reporting capabilities and business processes standardization work has created a short-term ‘bump’ in contract work. Many of the projects are due to be completed early in the New Year (or before). Once finished, these companies will be shedding staff once again to remove redundancies due to overlap in roles between the two companies and freeing up the staff that were solely employed for the integration project work itself.

The Following Market “Conditions” Have Also Been Noted:

Rates: Rates for non-specialized roles have remained flat for the past 6+ months. The exception is for ERP as demand has increased, albeit often for specialized skillsets as described above. Company “rate roll-backs” have halted as the employee and contractor rationalizations have been completed.

Skills with High and Growing Demand:  Eagle has noticed increased interest for contractors with the following skillsets:

  • Front-End Developers
  • Java Developers/Software Engineers/DevOps
  • Cyber Security Consultants
  • Project Managers (Agile, ERP, some Infrastructure)
  • ERP (Fiori/UI5) enhancement/upgrade work
  • IT Reporting – Cloud tools for data visualization – Tableau, Spotfire, Hana and related data warehousing/BI work. Predictive analytics and driving business value from data stores.

Skills with Neutral Demand:

  • Network/Storage Administrators
  • SaaS implementations (Sales Force, Service Now, Workday) + Traditional ERP (SAP/PS/Oracle)

Skills for Which We Have Seen a Decline in Demand:

  • .NET Developers (this is the first time in 10+ years that demand for Java/Front-end skills have outstripped .NET in Calgary)
  • Server Analysts/Administrators (Outsourcing companies are handling much of this demand by leveraging overseas options)

Existing open roles for Calgary can be viewed on here Eagle’s Job Board.

**Disclaimer: The market summary above reflects Eagle’s own experience. Please understand that this does not include interaction with 100% of the market. Eagle’s clientele tend toward the larger enterprise companies, therefore experience in Calgary’s SMB market may be substantially different.

If your experience or observations have been different, I encourage you to leave a comment so all may learn from your perspective as well!

How the Mining Industry is Creating New Opportunities for IT Contractors In Canada


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How the Mining Industry is Creating New Opportunities for IT Contractors In CanadaMining in Canada generates $35.6 billion to the country’s gross domestic product, with approximately 320,000 people operating within the mining industry. With mining being such a crucial part of Canada’s economy, it’s important that they make mining as efficient and easy as possible. Manually, miners will use large drills and rock tools to extract their minerals. But, with several technological advances taking the world by storm, Canada have jumped on the computing technology bandwagon to make their lives easier and extract more minerals than ever before. In fact, there are several computing technology solutions that continue to help hundreds of thousands of workers in Canada perform their job better. With this in mind, a huge number of new opportunities are opening up for IT Contractors in Canada within the mining industry, and here, we’re taking a closer look at a few of the areas that are impacting the industry the most.

Cloud Computing

Before technology became our most reliable source, a mining company would have to manually send a worker into the mining field in order to inspect on how the day-to-day running was. But, with cloud computing solutions weaving their way into the Canadian mining industry, that is a thing of the past! Beforehand, the person sent to check on the site had to compile a detailed report addressing the recent mining operations, which would usually take a week or even months to be seen by executives in the headquarters. By using cloud computing, though, business leaders can learn about on-site conditions in real time, allowing those within the Canadian mining industry to make any necessary changes to their mining procedures.

The Use of Robotics/AI

Mining is a very laborious job, with tasks such as extracting, drilling and blasting requiring a lot of time and effort from workers. Robotics has been tested in a range of different industries across the world, as with the right programming, they can perform these laborious tasks more efficiently than the average worker. This is ideal for miners, as not only do robots not feel pain (we are jealous), but they are also able to get jobs done quicker, thanks to high advanced technology. This isn’t the only advantage of using AI within the mining site though, as Canada still suffers with situations of miners being trapper underground, or restricted from reaching highly-valued areas. ANDROS Wolverine was the first mine rescue robot, and whilst he was unsuccessful during the Sago mine explosion in 2006, it certainly showed the potential for using robots in places that even humans can’t enter. Plus, we have had 11 years since the explosion to develop our technology, so who knows what we’re capable of now?

Airborne Gravity Gradiometer Technology

It sounds very confusing and complex, but it can prove as extremely helpful for Canadian miners. The ability to access mineral bodies is very time-consuming for miner, not to mention massively expensive. This type of mining technology is very impressive, as it measures subtle changes in the Earth’s gravity field, helping it to determine where ore bodies can be found within the mines. In addition, improvements have been made to the airborne gravity gradiometer technology in recent years, meaning that we can expect even more precise detections in the future. In fact, we have seen this technology prevail in Canada within the Ekati diamond mine, so it’s clear to see the benefits that it holds for the Canadian mining industry.

Plasma Technology

Canada is already makes huge amounts of money from the minerals that they extract in mines, but with plasma technology thrown into the mix, they could make even more! Plasma technology can boost the yield of precious metals, including the likes of gold, silver and platinum, by over 1,000 per cent compared to the standard metallurgical process. In fact, new radio frequency plasma technology has been developed in recent years, which heats complex ores such as zinc and nickel to extremely high temperatures in order to break down the structure of the ore. With such innovative technology, Canada can definitely expect to see a rise in their gross domestic product due to the new easy and efficient methods that technology provides to Canadian miners.

With traditional industries beginning to implement technologies in order to ensure that their processes are efficient and more eco-friendly, the implementation of cloud computing, AI and more are proving that IT contractors are more in demand than ever.

IT Industry News for September


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on October 10th, 2017

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the ICT industry for September 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of September in previous years …

Infosys logoFive years ago in September 2012 Infosys increased its management consultancy capability with the $330 million purchase of Lodestone.  Lenovo bought Stoneware, a software company focused on the cloud, and Ericsson bought ConceptWave.  A couple of interesting investment moves saw Microsoft invest in Klout and Silicon Valley VC Chameth Palihapitiya invest in Xtreme Labs.

Microsoft logoFour years ago in September 2013 Blackberry announced a quarterly loss of almost $1 million and laid off 4,500 people. Microsoft bought Nokia’s devices and services unit for more than $7 billion. Ebay paid $800 million for payment platform Braintree; Synnex bought IBM’s customer care division for $505 million; Rogers added to its data centre capacity with the $161 million purchase of Pivot Data Centres; Extreme Networks bought Entersys Networks for $180 million; and Manitoba Telephone Systems bought Epic Information Systems.

September 2014 saw some big deals announced, including Microsoft’s $2.5 billion purchase of gaming company Minecraft, Lenovo’s $2.1 billion purchase of IBM’s x86 server business and Cognizant’s $2.7 billion purchase of healthcare company, Trizetto Corp.  Hootsuite had an injection of cash and bought two companies, social telephony company Zeetl and social media marketing platform Brightkit.  Google also made two acquisitions, biotech company Lift Labs and desktop polling company Polar. There were plenty more deals announced, including Yahoo’s $8 million purchase of cloud based document hosting company Bookpad; Cisco’s purchase of private cloud company Metacloud; SAP’s purchase of expense software company Concur; Blackberry’s purchase of virtual identity software startup Movirtu and Red Hat’s purchase of mobile app company FeedHenry.

ACCENTURE LOGOTwo years ago in September 2015 there was a fair bit of M&A activity but no blockbuster deals.  Microsoft was very active, closing three deals, Adxstudio which provides web based solutions for Dynamics CRM; app developer Double Labs; and cloud security firm Adallom.  Accenture picked up the cloud services company Cloud Sherpas; IBM added cloud software startup StrongLoop; Netsuite paid $200 million for cloud based marketing company Bronto Software; and Blackberry paid $425 million for competitor Good Technology.  Hardware company Konica Minolta bought IT Weapons; Qualcomm bought medical device and data management company Capsule Technologie; Networking and storage company Barracuda Networks bought online backup and disaster recovery company Intronis; and Compugen bought some of the assets of another Canadian company Metafore.

HP logoLast year in September 2016 Tech Data paid $2.6 Billion for the technology solutions group of Avnet, and HP made the biggest printer acquisition to date, paying $1.05 Billion for Samsung’s printer business.  Other deals saw Google pay $625 million for Apogee, and restaurant company Subway bought online order taking software company Avanti Commerce.  One investment that caught my eye, in the staffing world saw Accenture invest in crowdtesting company Applause.

Which brings us back to the present …

September 2017 saw Google splash out $1.1 Billion to acquire HTC’s pixel team, strengthening its own smartphone capabilities.  In an interesting move IKEA bought gig economy company TaskRabbit, so perhaps you won’t need to put that furniture together yourself in the future!  HPE bought Cloud Technology Partners, presumably to strengthen its capabilities in that area and possibly access new clients.  Finally Edmonton company F12.net bought Vancouver’s ONDeck Systems as it pursues its goal to be a National IT Service Provider.

IBM logoHPE was also in the news, announcing yet another round of layoffs, this time 5,000 people before the year ends.  Equifax hit the news, retroactively announcing a huge cyber breach affecting 143 million customers which has since cost the CEO, CIO and CISO their jobs.  CareerBuilder also announced 120 layoffs, as part of consolidation following multiple acquisitions and now a new owner.  IBM continues to take heat for the Phoenix Project, which is the Canadian Federal Governments pay system and has been a huge mess … and in all honesty there is plenty of blame to go around for this fiasco.

canadian flagThe Canadian economy has been performing well, with 22,000 jobs added in August and 374,000 jobs created in the last year.  However storm clouds are gathering with huge new minimum wage hikes coming, non-business friendly changes to labour laws, carbon taxes and new Federal Tax legislation that will impact professionals and business owners.  Some observers suggest that we might face a Government induced recession in 2018.

Elsewhere the US economy continues to perform well, and the Trump administration is proposing tax cuts for business, which should create even more opportunity and possibly threaten Canada’s economy as Canadian businesses face tax hikes.  Worldwide, generally economies and job prospects are improving.  Even Greece improved its unemployment rate 2% over the last year, from 23% to 21%.

There were a few indicators of how our changing world will impact jobs with one report suggesting 4 million jobs in the UK will be replaced by robots in the next ten years.  Another 700,000 low skilled IT jobs will be lost to automation in the next five years.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month, the full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the October 2017 tech news in just about a month’s time.

IT Industry News for July 2017


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on August 16th, 2017

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for July 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of July in previous years 

Five years ago, in July 2012, Marissa Mayer became the new CEO at Yahoo and Dell bought Quest Software for $2.4 billion; Apple picked up Authentec for $356 million and Socialcam acquired Autodesk for $60 million.  Oracle was on a roll, buying (i) the assets of Skire (capital assets and facilities management software), (ii) Involver (a social marketing tools company) and (iii) Xsigo Systems (Network Virtualisation).  VMware was also busy, picking up Dynamic Ops (virtualisation software) and Nicira (a start-up in the networking software space).  One interesting deal saw Digg bought for $500,000 by Betaworks, when Digg had been valued at $200 million just four years ago.

Cisco logoJuly 2013 was quiet for M&A activity, but there were some interesting deals, with the big deal involving perennial acquirer Cisco shelling out $2.7 billion for security vendor Sourcefire. There were some other big names out shopping with EMC buying identity management company Aveska, Intel making an acquisition in Israel (a trend) of Omek a company specialised in the perceptual computing arena.  Apple bought Locationary, a Toronto company that is expected to be involved in improving Apple’s maps for iOS (remember when Apple dropped Google Maps!)  Finally, Ottawa’s Shopify bought Toronto-based design agency Jet Cooper.

Twitter logoJuly 2014 had a lot of M&A activity but no real blockbuster deals.  BlackBerry bought encryption company Secusmart GmbH; Oracle bought cloud services company TOA Technologies; Twitter bought a startup Madbits, a company that focuses on the media space; Yahoo also bought a startup Flurry in the mobile apps space; Teradata bought a couple of smaller “big data” companies, Hadapt and Revelytix; Apple bought a couple of smaller “books & podcast” companies Booklamp and Concept.io; Qualcomm bought education company EmpoweredU; and finally Nokia continue to rebuild after selling its devices and handsets business to Microsoft, this time buying Panasonic’s 3G and LTE base station operations division.

IBM logoJuly 2015 saw no billion-dollar deals, but there was some activity with some big names out shopping.  Microsoft made two acquisitions, paying $320 million for cloud security company Adallom and also picked up customer servicing software company FieldOne Systems. IBM picked up database as a service company Compose; Cisco paid $139 million for sales automation company MaintenanceNet; HP is buying a cloud development platform Stackato; Blackberry bought AtHoc which is a crisis communication tool; and DropBox bought messaging company Clementine.  Other acquisitions saw Cisco as a seller, with Technicolor paying $600 million for Cisco’s set top box division; Level 3 bought security firm Black Lotus; Amadeus bought travel software company Navitaire (a subsidiary of Accenture) for $830 million; eBay sold its enterprise unit for $925 million, having paid $2.4 billion for it four years ago.  In the continued blurring of the lines between technology companies and other industries, Capital One bank acquired design, development and marketing firm Monsoon.

Oracle logo a large software company originally noted for its databaseJuly 2016 saw some large deals, with Verizon making two multi-billion-dollar acquisitions.  The big name was Yahoo who they bought for $4.83 billion, but they also paid $2.4 billion for Fleetmatics who provide fleet and mobile workforce management services.  Oracle were also out spending big dollars, paying $9.3 billion for cloud based ERP company, Netsuite. Now if those deals were not big enough, Softbank (like Verizon they have a large telco presence – formerly Vodafone) paid a whopping $32.2 billion for chip designer ARM Holdings. Also joining the July billion dollar club was security vendor Avast, who bought AVG for $1.3 billion. Other deals this month saw Salesforce pay $582 million for cloud based startup Quip; Google bought video company Anvato; Terradata bought training company Big Data Partnership; and Opentext bought analytics company Recommind.

Which brings us back to the present …

Mitel LogoIn July 2017, Cincinnati Bell Inc. is buying Hawaiian Telcom Holdco Inc. for $650 million and OnX for $201 million. Mitel announced its acquisition of ShoreTel for $430 million as well as Toshiba’s unified communications business. In Toronto, digital signage solution provider, Dot2Dot, acquired Pixel Point Digital. PNI Canada Acuireco Corp. has purchased Sandvine Corp. for $562 million and plans to merge Sandvine with Procera Networks.

Reports indicate Microsoft plans to cut up to 3,000 jobs while streaming platform, SoundCloud has laid of 40% of its employees, and data storage provider, Seagate, plans more staff cuts due to weak financial performance.

According to threat intelligence provider, Risk Based Security, the number of publicly-reported data breaches in Canada this year is up to 59. In a study conducted by Forrester Data it is projected there will be 5.5 billion smartphone users around the world by 2020. In other news, there has been a recent increase in investments in European startups according to Invest Europe.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month, the full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website. Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the August 2017 industry news in just about a month’s time, until then … walk fast and smile!

Here’s How 5G Will Change Your Life


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Mobile technology is constantly being updated, and it does not take long for your current phone to go ‘out of style’. So what is the latest news in mobile technology? It’s 5G. This video from Techquickie defines 5G as mainly being built around the idea of connecting devices, and creating a more elaborate mobile network that will be able to handle all of these new connections. It will also allow for faster internet speeds, and ideally allow individuals to be able to use up to one GB/second.

Although it will not be available to the public for quite some time they are looking into doing trials for the 2018 and 2020 Olympic Games, and expect a widespread of 5G in about 2025. Looks like self-driving cars and automated homes are not too far away from being a reality. Let us know if you’re excited for this new 5G update in the comments below!