Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: recruiters

The Talent Development Centre includes advice for independent contractors in IT from one of Canada’s top staffing and recruitment agencies. See all posts about recruiters.

How Recruiters Know (or just think) You’re Lying

Experienced recruiters have talked to thousands of professionals throughout their careers. They get to meet great people and see hundreds of successful careers flourish, and they also see plenty of stunts by job seekers who will go to any extent to land a job. So naturally, recruiters who have been working with IT contractors for years are certain to catch the sneaky liars quite quickly. Unfortunately, it also means that they’re more skeptical of everyone. Even if you’re an ethical, honest professional, if you unintentionally raise a recruiter’s red flag, they may think you’re lying and proceed with caution, making your job search that much more difficult.

To avoid being falsely categorized as a sketchy candidate, it’s helpful to understand the basic signs recruiters use to identify unethical independent contractors. You’ll notice that it is easy to accidentally make these common mistakes and it could be the reason some recruiters are hesitant to follow-up on your recent job application.

Inconsistencies Between Your Resume and LinkedIn

Every recruiter is going to do at least some preliminary research before calling you in for an interview. This will, no doubt, include a look at your LinkedIn profile. In conjunction with reviewing your skills, projects and connections, they’re going to put your resume beside it to see if everything matches up. For many people, LinkedIn is a profile that you set-up quickly with little thought and then ignore for a while. Now consider how much effort goes into your resume, where you may provide more details, different titles, and additional experiences. While neither your online profile nor your resume is wrong, the differences cause a recruiter to ask some questions.

Inconsistencies Between Different Resumes

If you’ve submitted multiple resumes to a staffing agency over the years, you can be sure that your recruiter is reviewing your version from a few years ago as well. It’s impossible to change the past, so when they see that your education differs, time in a specific role got longer, or titles somehow changed, your credibility will start to dwindle. Especially in a tough job market, stretching the truth on your resume can be tempting. And while these little white lies do not make you unqualified or a bad person, they will hurt your chances hearing back from a recruiter.

Your Resume Looks Fake

Believe it or not recruiters receive a ton of fake, spammy resumes from people who want to get through the hiring process and make as much money as possible before they get figured out. The resumes are usually fabricated by the same people and need to be conspicuous enough to fool professionals, so they look extremely generic/templated and share many of the same traits. For example, fake resumes usually only include a simple Gmail address without any phone number or street address. The experience is also with large organizations scattered across North America, making it harder to verify. If you’ve engaged with a resume writing agency to help prepare your work or if your resume’s content naturally contains these symptoms, we recommend adding a personal touch with some explanations to avoid going directly into the burn pile.

There are Gaps in Your Resume

Perhaps you were travelling, took parental leave, required time for your health, or any other number of legitimate reasons to have a gap in your resume. To the skeptical recruiter, no matter how much they want to give you the benefit of the doubt, they wonder what you’re hiding. Did you work on a terrible project that was a disaster? Were you fired and don’t want the recruiter to know? As much as your personal reasons are none of a recruiter’s business, unless you help clarify the gaps in your resume, they’re going to make assumptions which may or may not be in your favour.

Your Story Changes

Ensure you carefully review your resume and everything you say you did, when you did it and how you did it. When a recruiter is interviewing (interrogating?) you in person, they may ask questions to catch some lies. Any inconsistencies in the story on your resume and the story you tell them will catch their attention. Even if the interviewer doesn’t see an inconsistency between your resume and your interview, it could be revealed when they call your reference. Especially when nervous, it’s easy to accidentally tell a story or explain a situation with details that aren’t accurate, which is why it’s always important to take a minute and think before answering any question.

There is nothing worse for a recruiter than an IT contractor who’s lied about their experience. Every recruiter has a dreadful story or two about that contractor who made it to onto a client’s site without half the qualifications they claimed. It does not take long for the client to recognize, the contractor is quickly fired, and the recruiter is left to pick up the pieces. It’s no wonder all recruiters are a little bit apprehensive when they see any discrepancies during the recruitment and hiring process.

A Beginner’s Guide to Recruitment Agencies

The Talent Development Centre is loaded with advice for working with recruitment agencies: How to choose an agency, how to grab a recruiter’s attention, questions recruiters will ask you, questions you should ask a recruiter, how to follow-up with recruiters, etc. But for newer job seekers and IT contractors, there are more basic questions that need to be answered: What does a recruitment agency do and why should I even work with them?

How Does a Recruitment Agency Work?

Recruitment agencies (also known as Staffing Agencies, Employment Agencies, Head-Hunters, etc.) help companies and organizations find workers, whether it be as full-time employees or for temporary, contract positions. Some agencies take a focused approach and recruit a specific skillset for their clients (for example, the majority of Eagle’s services centered are around IT contract professionals) while other companies take a broader approach and source a wide spectrum of talent for clients.

Recruiters at an employment agency usually conduct the complete recruiting and screening process for their clients, which includes not just searching, but also resume screening, interviewing, reference checking and negotiating with applicants. They continuously build relationships with professionals to understand their skills, interests and availability which ensures they can present candidates to a client as quickly as possible after receiving a request. Therefore, the end result of recruiters properly serving clients is that they also help job seekers find work.

How Do Recruitment Agencies Make Money?

Staffing agencies are always paid by the hiring company, and never by the job seeker.

In the case of permanent placements, the client usually pays the agency an agreed upon fee, which varies based on agencies, industries and roles. When a recruitment agency places a candidate in a temporary or contract position, the agency will hire that individual as a temporary employee or as an independent contractor in a business-to-business relationship. The agency then signs a contract with the client, stating they will provide somebody to perform the work. The staffing agency pays the individual for doing the work, and bills the client for both the cost of the individual and the cost of recruitment efforts. Hiring companies can be billed as a flat fee or an hourly rate that gets added to the worker’s hourly pay rate.

Should You Work with Recruitment Agencies?

You should cover every possible base when looking for a job and that includes talking to staffing agencies. Of course, applying to jobs directly and networking with people in your industry needs to happen, but so should building a relationship with a recruiter. They add value and help with your job search by providing access to unpublished job opportunities, providing advice to improve your resume, giving feedback on your interview skills, and connecting you to business resources such as contractor insurance (just to name a few).

Next time you’re scrolling through a job board and come across a bunch of postings from the same employment agency, don’t assume the situation is too good to be true. Apply to the job and meet the recruiter. While the job you originally applied to may no longer be available, you will be surprised at what else they can provide!

Do you have any other questions about staffing agencies and how they work? We’d love to clarify them for you! Just leave your questions in the comments below.

How to Talk Money with Recruiters

Sam Rahbar By Sam Rahbar,
National Training Manager at Eagle

No one likes to discuss salary or rate, it can be an awkward conversation. But as an IT consultant this is a topic that comes up all the time when discussing contract opportunities with recruiters. Rate conversations can often turn into a long drawn out back and forth between the recruiters and consultants. Here are five tips on how to work with a recruiter to avoid the unnecessary lengthy conversations and land the best rate possible:

  1. Customize your resume. Before applying to the role, make sure to include all your relevant experience related to the provided job description, including the nice to haves. Don’t leave any room for assumptions. Competition is fierce and a customized resume is the first step towards getting a more competitive rate.
  1. Remember, you are on the same team! A recruiter’s primary role is to present the best available candidate with the most competitive rate. Work with your recruiter to find out the top end of the rate and the sweet spot where the client likes to hire at. With VMS companies dictating level playing grounds for all recruiting agencies, these days all recruiters work within the same rate brackets and cannot go above or below a certain percentage. This means all recruiters will compete for the best candidate with the most competitive rate.
  1. Ask about market rate. When it comes to current market rates, recruiters have VIP access! There is no one better to educate you on who is hiring at what rate. This is crucial information when it comes to landing your next gig. Ask your recruiter for current market rates, so you are able to position yourself accordingly.
  1. Be flexible. I hear so many times about great candidates that lost out on opportunities due to not being flexible on a couple of dollars an hour. Clients want the job done with the best quality and most reasonable price. Sometimes that 2-3 dollars an hour can put you in a competitive advantage. And when you calculate 2 dollars an hour over a course of a 6 month contract, after taxes, it does not amount to much. It’s definitely not enough to lose out on a chance to work on a project with a reputable brand.
  1. A new project means a new budget. Different clients will have different budgets based on their industry, type of project and market rates. It is normal to have your hourly rate fluctuate 10 dollars, up or down, depending on the end client and type of project. So try not to use your most recent rate as a hard bottom-line for your next contract because that will potentially limit your options.
  1. Consider the BIG picture. When discussing a new opportunity with a recruiter, make sure to consider all angles: length of the contract, possibility of extension, getting exposed to new technology, or a new type of project under your belt. Think about what the positive effects could do for your marketability long term. There are other factors to consider like your hours, commute, company culture, and perks to name a few.

 

Stop Getting Spammed by Recruiters

We sometimes hear complaints from IT professionals who say they’re getting “spammed” by recruiters and staffing agencies. They fire back angry emails demanding to be removed from mailing lists and claiming they never signed up to receive such communications. In some cases, maybe these responses are warranted, but for the most part, great recruiters aren’t buying lists of email addresses and mass mailing a whole bunch of unqualified people who will never care about their job opportunity. That’s inefficient and doesn’t lead to results.

Recruiters are always building relationships with top candidates so they can quickly find somebody when an opportunity arises. In situations when a recruiter is trying to fill a role with hard-to-find talent, they need to get creative in searching for new professionals who will match the job description. That’s when they start calling and emailing people they may not know personally, but they’re still not contacting candidates randomly.

Why Are You Getting Unwanted Email from Recruiters?

If you receive an “unwanted” email from a recruiter then there’s probably a reason… and your past actions may have something to do with it.

If you’ve ever searched for a job, then it’s plausible that your name and resume are in a database somewhere — a database that recruiters use to seek out new talent. Not only do recruiters search their own agency’s database of past applicants, but many subscribe to databases of other online job boards like Monster, Indeed and CareerBuilder. When you apply to a job through any one of those websites, you are asked if your resume can be public. If you select Yes (or don’t select no), then recruiters have access to your resume. If you look awesome and a fit for their job, you can expect an email.

LinkedIn and other social networks are other sites where strategic recruiters search and are the cause of your surprise recruiter emails. According to Canada’s Anti-SPAM Legislation, if your email address is public, then you’ve provided consent to be contacted. Therefore, if you have a superb LinkedIn profile with an email address that’s visible to the public, then at some point, a recruiter is going to send you an email.

How Can You Avoid Unwanted Emails from Recruiters?

Based on the sources provided above, there are three very simple ways to reduce unwanted emails from recruiters:

  1. Read carefully when applying to any job and select the options that prevent your resume from being made publicly available or in a database. (You may also need to avoid specific job boards all together)
  2. Keep good track of where you apply to a job and return to those sources when your job search is complete to remove your resume and/or close your account.
  3. If you must publicize your email address, include a disclaimer clearly indicating who can and cannot email you. You could also go a step further and include this at the top of your resume that you’ve uploaded to a job board.

While this post is to help you prevent unwanted email, we still strongly encourage listening to and giving a recruiter a chance. Look into the person’s experience and their staffing agency’s track record and decide if a relationship with them could be beneficial down the road. You don’t have to be interested in the current job but if your contract is going to be up or if you may be considering something in the future, it’s never a terrible idea to have relationships with recruiters in your back pocket.

Contractors/Small Business Owners: Your Agency is an Extension of your Marketing Department

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President, Western Canada at Eagle

Contractors/Small Business Owners: Your Agency is an Extension of your Marketing DepartmentAs an independent contractor, you are a small business owner. And just as every business needs to sell its products and services so, too, must you from time to time. Long term, multi-year contracts aside, contractors’ businesses are very often defined by frequent client engagements. When you are busy delivering your service it can be a challenge to find the time to market your company, after all there are only so many hours in a day. Likewise, sales isn’t typically your primary business and many contractors and consultants struggle with this part of their business (or, at least, it isn’t their favorite part of running the business).

What’s an independent contractor to do? There are some basic things that every small business can do to ensure they are getting their brand out to the market. These include:

  • Maintain a nice clean, easy-to-navigate website that lets prospective clients know what you do best and have accomplished
  • Ensure your LinkedIn profile is accurate and up-to-date… and “connect” with as many people as possible… and participate in work-related, online forums and chat groups
  • Invest in business cards and stationery, an important part of your branding strategy
  • Network, network, network… Just as a restaurant’s success has a lot to do with its location, your business success is a result of people in your industry knowing about you and the work that your company does better than anyone else. Getting out where industry peers and potential clients meet and engaging with these people is vitally important
  • Work your “champions”. If you’ve been in business for any length of time, you will have made some deep and lasting professional relationships. These people will want to see you succeed and knowing that you are interested in pursuing new opportunities, they will do their best to help you identify new prospects by making introductions.

…And, as the title of this blog suggests, leverage your staffing agency partners to the fullest! Your agency doesn’t technically work for you as it is their customer base that hires them to conduct searches on their behalf; but that doesn’t mean you can’t benefit from your affiliation with them. Especially when it comes to marketing your business. Eagle, for example, holds multiple networking events each year, we send out industry and market updates regularly, and our Recruiters are great sources of information and ideas. Staffing companies make their business by finding the best possible talent for their clients and, if you happen to be a good fit for one of their open roles, they will do the selling for you!

Staffing companies do not charge you (the contractor) to work for them. Instead their clients negotiate hourly fees that they will pay over and above the rates that you charge. Most end-clients are content to pay a premium to off-load the search, vetting, qualification, onboarding, hiring, and payment functions to staffing specialists as it is much more efficient and cost effective than doing so themselves. And they find the best talent available in the market this way. Therefore, you are able to charge your regular rates and get the benefit of agencies selling your services for you. Be sure to visit their job boards regularly and by responding to their Recruiters when they call, you will be better aware and engaged in new opportunities.

Other things you can do to help your agency partners to make a better impact on your sales efforts is to be consistent in your messaging. Branding is very important for any business… what is it about your business that sets it apart? If your website,and resume and “elevator pitch”/sales messages are all on-point and consistent it makes it much easier for Recruiters to understand your value proposition and to sell your company to their clients. Recruiters will often prefer a consultant who does one thing very well (and can demonstrate this through past work experience) to people who are good at a lot of different things. It is easier to sell and easier for the end-client to see where the “fit” is in their own teams; so tailor your branding and messaging to the job you want and communicate this to your agency.

Another little thing that makes a big difference is to invest some time into building relationships with key Recruiters that you trust. With very little effort you can build your Recruiter contact into a business champion of yours. Ensuring that you are reachable and making yourself available to meet or talk goes a long way towards building a Recruiter’s preference for working with you.

A lot has been written in Eagle’s Talent Development Centre blog site over the years about building strong and successful relationships with agency Recruiters. Any and all of these hold great tips that will turn an agency into a salesforce that works for you! Here are some links to these past articles:

Breaking the “Working and Not Selling” and the “Selling and Not Working” cycle takes some focused attention… but by spending some time getting your business’s Marketing program in place, you can avoid some of the time-gaps between engagements and develop your career in the direction for which you’ve planned!

2017 in Review: Independent Contracting

2017 in Review: Independent ContractingAt the core of the Talent Development Centre is our desire to help independent contractors gain more opportunities and be more successful in their business. That is this blog’s mission. So, when summarizing a year, it’s only natural to review some of the most popular posts on the topic.

First, there’s the business of independent contracting…

Another part of being a contractor is working with staffing agencies. In many cases, it’s inevitable. Here are a few tips to help the relationship go smoothly…

9 Questions Independent Contractors Should Ask All Recruiters

Sam Rahbar By Sam Rahbar,
National Training Manager at Eagle

9 Questions Independent Contractors Should Ask All RecruitersAs an IT contractor/consultant, your relationships with IT recruiters can have a major impact on your job search journey. Especially since contractors are being distanced from the hiring managers and clients due to the introduction of MSPs (Managed Services Provider) & VMSs (Vendor Management Systems).

The days of working directly for an enterprise client and billing them directly are almost vanished. Your best and safest option is to go through an approved vendor.  As you might have already experienced, agencies (approved vendor or not) come in all shapes and sizes and unfortunately, not all operate under the same ethical guidelines. It is your responsibility to make sure that your best interest is a priority with your recruiter and agency of choice.

Just like recruiters ask questions to vet you, you need to do the same the first time you deal with each agency to make sure that they are ethical and trustworthy. Below is a list a list of questions that will help you find out more about an agency before working with them.

Where did you find my profile?

If you haven’t heard of that recruiter/agency before and/or if you don’t have your resume posted online, you’ll want find out how your contact info is surfaced.

This question could help with positioning your experience better; by knowing what they have seen/read so far. It also helps you find out which platform (Monster/LinkedIn/GitHub/..) gives you the most visibility.

What’s your specialty? (industry/vertical within IT or contract vs fulltime)

Tech space for be confusing and frustrating, especially for a non-technical person. When it comes to your career, you want to make sure that you are trusting recruiters who understand the domain (at least from a high level). A non-technical recruiter won’t be able to explain the client environment and what technologies are must-have vs nice-to-have and why.

Is this call regarding a job opportunity or just a status update?

This will help you market yourself more efficiently, whether it is for a specific role or for a general status update. Based on the nature of the call, do you want to take it now or later?

What is your history with this client/hiring manager? How long have you been working with them?

You want to be working with recruiters/agencies who know the clients and have a successful history, because they know the in’s and out’s of the client environment and hiring process. This can maximize your chances of getting the job by minimizing the surprises at the interview stage.

Are you the only one working on this role?

You want to know the competition. If the recruiter/agency you are working with has an “exclusive” order, this means:

  1. a) They have a really good relationship with the client
  2. b) They can tell you exactly what the competition landscape looks like.

What is the hiring process? Are there interview times booked?

Does the recruiter/agency know what to expect? Or are they just phishing for a resume to open doors with? If the timelines are set and clear, do they work for you?

How long has the job been open?

Sometimes the client is not sure what they are looking for and they use the interview process as a way to make up their mind. Or they have an internal candidate and they just want to make sure they are making the right choice. A job that has been open for more than 2 months is a red flag!

What is the full package? How flexible is the client?

Clients often look to save money by advertising the role with a lower rate than they’re willing to pay. If you genuinely feel your market rate is above the rate mentioned, it would not hurt to ask how flexible the client is willing to be.

What is next?

Always make sure that you are clear about the agency’s processes and next steps as it pertains to you. Are they sending your resume? When should you expect an answer? Can you talk to other recruiters in the same firm? What if you wanted to apply to a different job at the same client that they are sending your resume to?

Your conversations with recruiters should not be one way, it should be a dialogue in which you qualify their client list and their job opportunities and they qualify your skills and “fit” factor.

So, next time to talk to a recruiter for the first time, make sure to take an extra 2 minutes and ask questions so you can get to know them right at the get-go and avoid any time wasting down the line.

Creating a Memorable “Recruiter Experience”

Creating a Memorable "Recruiter Experience"Marketers talk frequently about “customer experience” — the concept that a good relationship with clients goes beyond service during the sale, and extends from the minute the customer has contact with the organization to the second they decide they’ll never need those services again (maybe even after). Companies who strive for an exceptional customer experience recognize that every touch point with that customer must be positive and memorable. Done right, this can give companies a competitive advantage over their less-customer-experience-focused competitors.

When it comes to hiring, great recruiters also buy into this idea to ensure the entire “candidate experience” is positive for all who apply. They consistently reach out with opportunities, answer questions and help at every stage of the hiring process. Similar to the customer experience, the better the candidate experience, the better the relationship will be between the recruiter and candidate.

A strong relationship with recruiters is a valuable asset for any independent contractor who is always looking for the next gig. Given the benefits of customer and candidate experience, could independent contractors apply the same principles to create a positive “recruiter experience”? At first glance, the idea seems backwards — after all, recruiters should be the ones bending over backwards for IT contractors — but at the same time, what a unique way to stand out from your competition (other skilled job applicants)!

How can you go above and beyond to create a positive recruiter experience? Think of everything you would expect from a company when getting a positive customer experience. Here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Keep communication open. Return phone calls and emails, update them on your status, and be honest in what you’re seeking.
  • Always be polite. When a recruiter calls you at an inconvenient time, misunderstands your experience or doesn’t solve your problem the first time, your immediate instinct could be to get angry. Try to take the high road in these circumstances.
  • Work hard to resolve problems quickly, accepting responsibility when necessary. Situations beyond anybody’s control happen during a job search and a contract. Bad things also happen that were within somebody’s control — maybe the recruiter’s, maybe yours. Regardless, work with the recruiter to fix things and accept your share of the blame if that’s the case.
  • Be proactive to help them get what they need sooner. Recruiting is a fast-paced business. If you get your resume or return phone calls before any other candidate, a recruiter will remember you in a positive light.
  • Make it easier for them to do their job. There’s no need to go into their office and recruit for them, but simply being accessible, providing enough details to questions, or giving referrals will show that you care about the recruiter experience.
  • Give something free every once in a while. Don’t worry, we’re not suggesting you offer to work for free. However, you can turn the tables and buy your recruiter a coffee next time you’re together.

A valuable relationship is built when both parties recognize that it is a two-way street, with recruiters arguably having to contribute more to the experience than contractors. That said, all IT contractors have been in the unfortunate situation when the best work is on the other side of a terrible recruiter who doesn’t understand the definition of service, let alone experience. In these cases, it’s up to you to provide the experience, become memorable, and increase your chances of winning this job, as well as many future ones to come. In summary, the recruiter experience and candidate experience go hand-in-hand, and we all need to do our part.

How Did a Recruiter Find Me When I Never Applied to Their Job?

How Did a Recruiter Find Me When I Never Applied to Their Job?

We hear this question occasionally from IT contractors — “How did you get my email or phone number when I’ve never created a profile with your staffing agency?” Some technology professionals may let a recruiter know they’re happy in their current full-time job and others may jump at the opportunity for an upcoming project, but all who ask the question are curious as to the methods a recruiter has taken when seeking new, fresh technology talent.

First, let us put your mind at ease, while recruiters are resourceful, they’re not spying on you, buying lists, or doing anything else considered unethical to get your contact information. They use various tools and techniques when filling a client’s job opening and if you happen to be a good fit for the position, your name is sure to appear at some point during their research.

Here are some things you may be doing that are helping recruiters find you:

You have a detailed LinkedIn Profile

It should not come as a surprise to you that technology recruiters seek out top talent on LinkedIn. If you have an up-to-date, detailed profile, including project descriptions and recommendations, your chances of receiving connection requests from recruiters are raised. When your email address and/or phone number are made public in the contacts section, anybody can access them to connect with you that way. You can request not to be contacted by email, either directly on your profile or with a polite response to the first message you receive from somebody. The ethical recruiters will always respect your wishes.

You uploaded your resume somewhere online

Major job boards sell access to their database to recruiters, both in staffing agencies and private companies. When you apply to any job or create a profile with them, you’ve also opened yourself up to receiving phone calls and emails about new opportunities. Again, depending on your current situation, this can either be a benefit to your job search or a bit annoying. You usually have the option to disallow your resume to be shared, but remember to return and change those settings when your job search continues.

You participated in an online forum

Many knowledgeable technology professionals, especially developers, participate in online forums on websites like Stack Overflow, GitHub and Quora. IT contractors active in these places are often the type of quality people recruiters want working on their projects so, naturally, they keep an eye on these websites. Even if your profile does not include your contact information, when a recruiter sees that you are skilled, they will seek you out on LinkedIn or a job board so they can learn more about your professional interests.

You did good work somewhere else

The old fashioned, non-internet word-of-mouth! It’s difficult for a great IT contractor to stay under the radar. When you do exceptional work for a client, your manager or other technology professionals on your team will be quick to recommend you when asked by a recruiter. It’s a fact that the best contractors rarely search for work at all — the opportunities come to them!

You did create a profile, you just don’t remember

As the old saying goes: “Never say never.” Sure you never applied to a recruiter’s job… in the past few years, but what about 5 years ago? Or 10 years ago? Staffing agencies keep their database of candidates and their resumes for a long time and recruiters may review people who they haven’t heard from in some time. They’ll understand that your resume needs updating; however, they’ll also anticipate where you may be in your career today and take the opportunity to check-in and see how things are going.

Keep in mind that a recruiter only contacts you if they believe you could be a good fit for one of their clients and that the position is a good fit for you too. They don’t want to waste your time, and also have no interest wasting their own time with an uninterested candidate. If you’re not seeking new opportunities, politely let them know and you can both move on. Otherwise, take a few minutes to learn about their recruitment agency and its clients — it may be the next best thing for your career!

Should You Hold a Grudge Over Your Recruiter?

Should You Hold a Grudge Over Your Recruiter?Do you have to forgive a recruiter who’s done you wrong or made you angry during your job search? The simple answer is no, you don’t have to forgive anyone. There are plenty of staffing agencies in the market and you can easily find a new partner.

As with every other aspect of life, you never have to forgive somebody, but should you? That’s a more complex question, so naturally, has a more complex answer. Almost every personal development expert will tell you that holding grudges does little to improve your life, wastes a lot of energy, and can cause you to miss out on positive things in your future. While we don’t expect forgiving a recruiter will bring you eternal happiness, it may prevent you from missing out on future IT contracts. Before writing your recruiter and recruitment agency off the books forever, step back and ask yourself a few questions:

Why am I angry?

This is the first and most important question. After the dust settles, reflect on what made you so angry and decide if it is as grave a situation as it was when you were furious. Were your recruiter’s wrong-doings based on a mistake or lack of knowledge, or was it an ethical situation that speaks to who they are as a person?

Is it all the recruiter’s fault?

A tough question to ask yourself, but was there anything you could have done better to improve the outcome of this mishap? Often communication on both parts, or lack thereof, is the root a preventable misunderstanding.

Am I being empathetic enough?

Try to understand the recruiter’s point of view. They get pressure from many different directions and have to make difficult decisions.  Have you properly communicated the situation to your recruiter to give them a chance to make it right?

Does this issue reflect on an individual or the staffing company?

Staffing agencies are more than just the one or two recruiters you speak to. The best ones have solid processes that ensure you’re paid on time and protected tax-wise, as well as long-standing relationships with clients who have the best technology contract opportunities. It would be a shame to walk away from all of this because of a poor recruiter. If you truly can’t work it out with the recruiter, escalate to a manager so you can continue your relationship with the recruitment agency.

Forgive and forget?

We often hear the expression “Forgive and forget.” This may be true in playground rules, but does not apply in business. When somebody does you wrong, forgiving them is your choice, but there is no obligation to forget. While we do recommend moving on and continuing with business, it’s always safe to keep past situations in mind. Use what you learned to understand how you can work better together and proceed with caution where necessary.