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The Reasons that Clients Give for Rejecting Great Candidates

Alison Turnbull By Alison Turnbull,
Delivery Manager at Eagle

As recruiters we are often surprised when a candidate, who we thought was perfect for a role, is rejected for an opportunity that they were well suited for.

There have been several previous posts that we have shared providing interview tips and tricks, but in this post I wanted to share some specific feedback that we have received from clients. Keeping these important things in mind will hopefully help you to be successful in your next interview.

They were all over the map

We’ve heard this described in many different ways: “They rambled or they went on and on or they went way off track.” One of the things that I coach everyone on, even the most senior of candidates, is to try and keep things concise. It’s common in an interview situation when nerves are a bit rattled to want to talk. And talk. And talk. An interviewer will often take a moment or two to capture information that you have shared, but don’t take that silence to mean that you should keep talking. The best advice is to answer a question in a clear and concise manner – and stop talking. If the interviewer doesn’t respond (and therefore seems to be looking for more), ask “Would you like me to expand on that?” OR “Would you like me to share a specific example?” If you answer a question and then go off on an unrelated tangent, the interview is as good as over.

They didn’t explain their experience well

We often hear that candidates weren’t successful in explaining their experience in a relatable way. It’s helpful to refer to the STAR method when preparing for an interview. Although this format is normally recommended for behavioural-based interview questions, it’s a great way to be sure you are highlighting all aspects of relevant experience in relation to a question. Speaking at a high level and giving vague answers rather than highlighting specific projects, experiences or accomplishments does not tend to bode well, and will leave any interviewer rushing to finish the interview. Be prepared with specifics and have some key project examples jotted down that you can quickly refer to – don’t assume that you will be able to recall them during the interview.

They shared too much

We hear this feedback often and have to wonder what people are thinking when they share too much personal information in a job interview. I once had an employee tell a prospective employer that they had started contracting because of personal debt, and then proceeded to give a number! This can also include speaking poorly of a previous employer, which is never a good idea. If you are trying to explain a gap in employment or a reason for leaving a role, keep it fairly high level, don’t come off as defensive, and maintain your professionalism at all times. If you are tempted to share that your wife left you, your dog died, or your uncle was in jail – write a country song instead.

A good recruiter will help you prepare for an interview and share some insight into what to expect to help you best prepare, but it’s up to you to use and keep the above feedback in mind. If you use common sense and exude professionalism you are sure to land the job!

 

12 Signs You’re Working with an Ethical IT Recruiter

12 Signs You're Working with an Ethical IT RecruiterIT contractors and job seekers have literally hundreds of technology recruiters to choose from when searching for new work. ACSESS, Canada’s staffing industry association, has more than 1000 member offices across the country, and that doesn’t include the many more employment agencies who don’t contribute. With that many staffing agency players, odds are that although most recruiters you deal with will be helpful, you’re bound to come across some who are terrible, lazy, rude or, worst of all, unethical.

Selecting an IT recruiter has many considerations — their connection to the market and opportunities, their ability to communicate, the additional value they bring, etc. — and whether or not they meet your ethical threshold. Unethical recruiters will not only fail to find you the right job, they also bring you down with them and tarnish your professional reputation.

The good news is that ethical recruiters can be easy to spot as long as you know what you’re looking for. Here are 12 traits all ethical recruiters share:

  1. They’re part of their staffing industry association and follow a code of ethics.
  2. They never ask you for money
  3. They want to meet you and get to know you, your skills, and your preferences
  4. They’ve taken the time to know a client and opportunity before presenting it to you
  5. They never exaggerate the opportunity or hide facts
  6. They’re clear about the hiring process (theirs and the client’s)
  7. They never try to push you into a role you’re clearly not a fit for
  8. They ask for your consent before sending anything to a client
  9. They never encourage you to lie
  10. They only let you update your own resume (or make a specific request to make updates and provide you with complete details)
  11. They work with the other recruiters within their agency, so you learn about all new opportunities
  12. They encourage you to work with other recruiters and agencies

If you can confidently check every one of these off of your list, then proceed and build that relationship!

If you’re working with a recruiter who doesn’t clearly meet one or more of these traits, we recommend treading carefully with your relationship and asking more questions. You may even consider moving on to another staffing agency. What other traits do you look for in an IT recruiter to judge their ethics?