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All Talent Development Centre posts written by a member of the executive team at Eagle, Canada’s premier staffing agency.

Regional Job Market Update for Ottawa, Ontario

David O'Brien By David O’Brien,
Vice President, East Region & Government Services at Eagle

As 2018 came to a close, the Ottawa Job Market in December saw the unemployment rate tick up to 4.9% after a fairly robust job gains in October and November. Technology did continue to be a bright spot, with more job gains in December, however, not enough to offset losses in other areas of our local economy.

Shopify LogoHarley Finkelstein, Co-Founder of the near $16B (with a B!) Ottawa-based Shopify, recently tweeted (@harleyf) about the outlook for Ottawa. The advent of new LRT, a booming startup ecosystem with lots of new angel investors, and the nearby natural beauty Ottawans have easy access to all seemingly underscore the steady but sure sense that the Ottawa Technology economy, while not the boom of the early 2000’s, has reason to be very excited about where things are going. We’re seeing a number of newly funded and burgeoning startups traverse across technologies, including AI, Blockchain, IoT, autonomous vehicles plus traditional software-based companies. While not the halcyon days of the Nortels/Corels of the very early 2000’s, there is certainly plenty for Ottawans to be optimistic about.

Ottawa Job MarketThe other big player in the local market is of course the Federal Government who have been on a steady hiring pace for quite a while. Large players like Shared Services Canada are hiring many IT contractors on a permanent basis to help them deliver technology services across Federal Government Departments. The past Quarter, and in fact year, has been a very busy one for IT Staffing agencies providing the government with the critical IT resources the Feds need to reach their Digital Government goals. The Federal Government is focused on moving more and more to cloud-based services and will need a lot of help from private sector to do so from Data Architects through Data Residency and Security. With the burgeoning Start-Up scene growing together with the many more mature technology sectors I have referenced, it is hoped the Feds will look to review and revise their contingent hiring practices to be quicker, cleaner and more efficient to continue to compete in the months and years ahead in Ottawa.

As the calendar turns over to 2019 and we look ahead, history will tell us that Election years tend to somewhat freeze hiring as ruling governments look to hold steady any technology project announcements. Visions of Phoenix Pay stories and in the headlines keep politicians up at night with fear, we will see if that is the case in the coming months.

Roles in demand in Ottawa currently include Front End Developers, PMs (including a need for Agile PMs for the Federal Government), Data Architects, Cyber Security, and Testers.

IT Industry News for November 2018

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on December 7, 2018

IT Industry News - November 2018A Little History of previous year’s Novembers …

Five years ago in November 2013 Opentext paid $1.1 Billion for cloud based integration services company GXS Group and another Canadian deal saw Mitel buy Aastra for close to $400 million.  Other deals included ebay’s $800 million purchase of global payments company Braintree; Apple’s $370 million purchase of 3D sensor company PrimeSense; and Akamai’s purchase of Velocius Networks.

November 2014 was an exceptionally quiet month on the M&A front with the largest deal Yahoo logobeing the merger of two semiconductor companies, Cypress Semiconductor and Spansion to form a $4 billion company; private equity company Carlyle Group paid $700 million for investment bank technology company Dealogic and Yahoo shelled out $640 million for video advertising company BrightRoll.

The apple logo and apple with a bite out of itThree years ago November 2015 saw expedia pay $3.9 billion for HomeAway as a vehicle to better compete with Airbnb.  Zayo Holding Group became the first foreign company to own a Canadian telco after paying $465 million for Allstream.  Other, smaller deals saw Apple buy Faceshift, a motion capture company whose technology was used in a Star Wars movie; and Lightspeed POS bought SEOshop, increasing its size as a competitor to Shopify.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro grow its Brazilian presence with the purchase of ACAO; PCM bought Edmonton based services firm Acrodex; Data centre company CentriLogic bought infrastructure company Advanced Knowledge Networks; solution provider Scalar Systems bought another Toronto company, professional services firm Eosensa; and Washington based New Signature bought Toronto based Microsoft Partner, Imason.

November 2016 saw Broadcom acquire Brocade Communication Systems for $5.9 billion; Adobe purchased multi-channel programmatic video platform TubeMogul for $540 million; IT services and outsourcing provider Wipro Limited bought IT cloud consulting firm Appirio for $500 million; Oracle Corp. announced its plans to acquire DNS solution provider, Dyn Inc.; SoftwareOne acquired and integrated House of Lync; and Avnet completed an acquisition of Hackster.

Last year in November 2017 the big M&A activity for the month saw investment firm Thoma Bravo pay $1.6 billion for Barracuda networks.  McAfee also made an acquisition of Skyhigh Networks now that they are no longer a part of the Intel group of companies.  Smaller deals saw Talend buy Restlet and Qualys buy Netwatcher.

Which brings us back to the present …

November 2018 was a busy month in the M&A space, with lots of action!  The largest deal saw SAP shell out $8 billion for experience management company Qualtrics.  Not far behind was Commscope paying $7.4 billion for telecommunication equipment maker ArrisVista Equity partners paid $1.94 billion for cloud software company Apptio; and private equity fund CVC paid $1.8 billion for a global IT and managed services provider, ConvergeOne Holdings.  The final billion dollar deal saw Blackerry make its largest acquisition to date, paying $1.4 billion for AI cybersecurity startup Cylance.

LinkedIn LogoIn other deals, Thoma Bravo bought security testing vendor Veracode for $950 million; LinkedIN paid $400 million for a surveying startup, Glint; power management company Eaton is paying $300 million for Turkish company Ulusoy Elektrik; and Citrix shelled out $200 million for intelligent portal company Sapho.

Microsoft logoThere were plenty of big name companies out shopping with no price tag named, Accenture bought a German design agency Kolle Rebbe; Apple bought AI company Silk Labs;  HPE bought big data company Bluedata; Oracle bought Talari Networks; Cisco bought networking company Ensoft; Microsoft bought another AI company, startup XOXCO; Red Hat (recently purchased by IBM) bought storage startup NooBaa; VMware bought Kubernotes startup Heptio; Symantec bought a couple of companies, Appthirty and Javelin Networks; and DXC bought a couple of companies TESM and BusinessNow.

Amazon logoIf that wasn’t enough action for one month, Amazon announced it would be investing $5 billion into its new headquarters in New York City and Arlington Virginia; Marriott announced a data breach that affects 500 million guests; and Facebook also announced a security breach affecting 50 million users!

The job news around the world seems to generally be one favouring the job seeker, with tightening labour markets.  There are of course exceptions and Brexit seems to be taking its toll in the UK.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month.  The full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the December 2018 tech news in just about a month’s time.

 Until then, Walk Fast and Smile!

Working Remotely — An Opportunity and a Challenge!

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

What Working Remotely Means to Eagle:

It has been over 5 years since Eagle formalized a distributed work strategy — WORKshift.  It is now a fully integrated part of our company’s DNA and is part of the reason that Eagle has been recognized as one of Canada’s “Great Places To Work” for the past 4 years.  Our staff appreciate the flexibility it provides and allows our team to contribute wherever and whenever they can be most productive.  Our WORKshift program incorporates a number of different scenarios including: Time Shifting (working outside of non-core hours, either earlier or later in the day), Work from Home, Mobile Working (accessing the full suite of corporate tools when out on calls), and Distributed Teams (we build functional teams between office and across Canada for projects).  WORKshift means happy, productive staff members and the ability to accomplish things more quickly than we could without this ability.  It has been very good for our business.

What It Means to You, the Contractor:

There has been a lot of information about Remote Work online, in the news, and around boardroom tables.  Technology has progressed to the point where standard, mainstream applications allow companies and people to work in a distributed sense without the need for customization or special processes and protocols.  It’s available to the masses and is becoming more mainstream in business.  As a contractor, you can benefit by being able to work for organizations in other cities or manage between multiple contracts as you no longer need to be physically present to contribute.  Travel time can be greatly reduced, meaning more billable hours available.  It also may allow you to collaborate with other independent contractors to form virtual teams to provide deeper value for your clients.

Challenges That Working Remotely Raise:

Of course anything this valuable comes with its share of challenges.  Security, for example, is a big issue.  Some companies allow for VPN access but many are extremely sensitive to allowing non-employees access to corporate resources.

Being able to compete for work regardless of location is a two-edged sword.  Certainly that can open new opportunities to capable contractors.  However, it also means that competition for jobs/roles can come from practically anywhere if the job to be completed is truly irrespective of the work location.  In the future, certain roles may be bid on by a global labour market.  Already we see off-shoring in the mainstream, but individual contracts have the potential of being next.

Team management and oversight is another hurdle to successful remote work arrangements.  There are new skill sets required to be an effective leader (or worker) in a distributed work environment.  Some people are better suited to working remotely than others; and managers/project managers also can be taxed by the requirements of managing a virtual team.  Managing to deliverables vs. direct observation is a big cultural change for many companies.  Anyone familiar with the concept of presenteeism understands the fallacy of assuming people are working just because they happen to physically be at work.  The world is quickly moving towards deliverable-based evaluation, which is something already very familiar to the contractor community.

The following chart from Work EvOHlution shows key attributes of leaders for distributed work strategies:

chart from Work EvOHlution shows key attributes of leaders for distributed work strategies
Source: Work EvOHlution

In academia and consulting firms, more and more research is being completed to prepare companies and people for the realities and complexities of distributed work.  In Eagle’s experience, we partnered with CED (Calgary Economic Development) who was pioneering the business application of WORKshift, and also with “The Leadership Store”, a research-focused company affiliated with the University of Calgary that specialized in distributed work systems.  They are now operating under the name Work EvOHlution and provide a number of assessments, readiness strategies and coaching options to companies, teams, trainers and individual workers who wish to maximize the effectiveness of remote-work business practices.  Both organizations – CED and EvOHlution – were invaluable to Eagle as we set up our own WORKshift strategy.

Setting Yourself Apart:

Regardless of your own personal work-location preferences, the world is moving towards this work-from-anywhere/anytime paradigm.  Consideration should be given as to your own preparedness for this shift.  Most everyone should be able to work as part of a remote work force, but only those who are most prepared and have the necessary skills, communication and work habits will be able to flourish.  It just may be a way to differentiate yourself from others who are muddling through these newer changes to the work environment.

BONUS: Tips for Working on a Distributed Team (From Work EvOHlution):

  • Not everyone is suited to working remotely on a full-time basis, but most people can do a mix of office and remote work.
  • Kick-off new teams face-to-face.
  • Learn communication preferences of each team member.
  • Don’t over-rely on any one communication method (e.g., e-mail).
  • Avoid communicating constructive feedback or frustration through e-mail/instant messaging.
  • Set response time deadlines verbally and in writing and stick to them.
  • Match the communication medium to the purpose.
  • Create goals and measures that are accessible and achievable.
  • Set up mechanisms for feedback.
  • Celebrate and reward successes. Find creative ways to celebrate from a distance.
  • Develop a distributed team charter.
  • Use technology (video conferencing, teleconference, chat, email) and train your team on the software being used; when introducing a new software have a pilot period where everyone is expected to give it their best shot and report back on pros and cons.

Changes are Coming to How the Federal Government Hires IT Contractors

David O'Brien By David O’Brien,
Vice President, East Region & Government Services at Eagle

Changes are Coming to How the Federal Government Hires IT ContractorsThe Federal government last reformed procurement around IT Professional Services over 10 years ago, introducing the supply methods Task-Based Informatics Professional Services (TBIPS) in December 2007 and Solutions-Based Informatics Professional Services (SBIPS) the following July ’08. TBIPS has by far been the most-used vehicle across the Federal Government to acquire IT contractors, with the last known spend figures being over $1 billion in 2016-17 and it’s expected to have topped $1.5 billion the following fiscal year.

Although the spend is significant, there has been a long-building uniform dissatisfaction with the evolution of TBIPS among ALL stakeholders — industry/suppliers, client departments and IT contractors. I currently sit as the President of the National Association of Canadian Consulting Businesses (NACCB). Over the last several years, the organization has been very active in working with the Feds in advocating real changes to the way the Government acquires IT contractors.  The overall objective is to create a process that is simpler, quicker, focuses on quality over price and most importantly, results in a better procurement outcome for Canadian taxpayers.

The Federal government has been receptive and have begun in earnest a full TBIPS Review Process, engaging all stakeholders and have assured us they are willing to put “everything on the table” in order to modernize what has become a very cumbersome and often dysfunctional procurement process.

It is our hope the new process focuses on the quality of IT professionals and away from the over-reliance on lowest price as the primary awarding criteria. After all, contractor quality is a function of both supply and cost. The current way in which TBIPS solicitations are conducted tends to have a negative impact on both supply and cost. At a very high level of generalization, when evaluations are based on lowest price or artificial median bid rates, it guarantees a low price. That in turn all but guarantees two things — a low quality resource and frequent consultant turnover.

When someone is looking to have their roof re-shingled, usually the lowest bid is also of the lowest quality, and so the same concepts hold true for professional services. You get what you pay for, and if the goal is to get someone at -20% of the median, which itself is an artificially downward-skewed measurement of “market rate”, then the result is predictable.

As to supply, the evaluation of solicitations typically takes so long that even if candidates that are bid were legitimately available at the time of submission, by the time the solicitation is awarded there is little chance that they are still available. The current process has created an environment, unfortunately, where unethical vendors are fully aware of the long evaluation process and can bid candidates solely to maximize score (they typically do not consider legitimate availability). When the solicitations are awarded, the candidates are not available and a backfill process must be initiated.

There a number of changes the NACCB strongly recommended that will serve to make for a far better procurement. For example, some of the significant and true process changes that will undoubtedly serve all interests much better include establishing a Vendor Performance mechanism to reward quality-based vendors over under-performing vendors focused on the lowest price only. As well, the elimination of paper only based grids (Ottawa is probably the only city in North America that sees 30,50, 80 page! resumes) and the implementation of a Skills Assessment/Interview both to assure resource availability and to truly vet skills as part of the process.

We know today there is a severe skills shortage that is expected to get more challenging in IT for the foreseeable future. The ability for the Federal Government to compete to acquire these resources will be imperative. Having an efficient, clean and quick hiring process will be critical to that competitiveness.

Canadian Job Market Update

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

Canadian Job Market UpdateIn the second half of 2018 the general message to technology job seekers is a positive one, and below I will explain why, and also why there is some caution to that statement.

On the face of things a 5.8% unemployment rate is as good as it has been, and Canada has created 240,000 jobs (mostly full time) in the last twelve months which is all good.  The downside for the economy is that a large portion of those jobs have been public sector, which while good for the job seeker today is not at all good for Canada’s economy.  As we have seen in Ontario, a change in political power means that investment in public sector jobs can change quickly as Ontario has a hiring freeze and a pay freeze for executives.  Overall I expect there to be plenty of opportunity in the public sector due to the large numbers of retirees that will need to be replaced, even if new jobs are curtailed.

Canada’s economy, like most of the world, is doing well. The TSX as a representative market indicator is in around the 16,500 points which is about 1,500 higher than last year.  The price of a barrel of oil is up around 65c which is much better than the $50 we saw perhaps a year ago.  As indicated above, the unemployment numbers are also good.  The Canadian dollar has ranged between 75c and 80c for a while, but NAFTA negotiations, the trade war with the US, the potential carbon tax impacts, loss of investment in Canada, the continuing oil patch debacle and recent labor law changes in Ontario can all conspire to change the situation.

One of the drivers of opportunity for jobs in Canada is the success of the US market, which has added jobs consistently, month over month since the last recession.  The stories of skills shortages, particularly in tech are common.  The TechServe Alliance attributes the slowing in growth of IT jobs to the growing skills shortage in the tech space.  We are seeing, and will continue to see large Global companies with headquarters in the US opting to add capacity in Canada, where there is an educated workforce, in similar time zones and within easy reach of head office.  Amazon, Facebook, Google and others have announced such activity in recent months.  So opportunities will exist for people willing to relocate to the US, in addition to jobs in Canada being created by US companies.

The GTA is Canada’s largest market, and is home to more head offices than any other city in Canada by a large margin.  The financial sector is largely headquartered here and is a huge employer of technology resources.  The telecommunications industry also has a large tech base in the GTA.  As the fourth largest city in North America the GTA represents 60% of Eagle’s business and probably 60% of tech jobs in Canada.

Tech job activity is relatively strong in most markets across Canada.  The one exception would be Calgary, which has not returned to pre-oil crisis levels of activity but is still busier this year than last.

The type of roles that have been in most demand at Eagle in the recent past have been developers, business analysts, project managers, Sys Admins, Architects and database admins.

In summary, people with tech skills should have little difficulty in finding employment, either contract or perm for the foreseeable future.  A willing ness to relocate to the bigger centres will only increase their marketability.  The only potential downside is whether Canada can maintain its competitiveness given the aggressive approach of the US administration in supporting US business.  I expect our government to act at some point to provide relief to Canadian business.

Our advice to clients is to ensure there are clear, clean hiring practices that move quickly through the hiring process.  It is a candidate market again and that means the best talent is snapped up quickly, often with multiple offers.

That’s my look at the Canadian Job market to date in 2018.

Baby Boomers v.s. Millennials: How to Communicate and Overcome the Generation Gap

Breigh Radford By Breigh Radford,
Director, Human Resources at Eagle

How many times have you heard that the key to a good relationship is communication? Probably forever! But how well do you communicate with the different generations. Recently, I was told by a Baby Boomer (ages 54-72) that Millennials (ages 22-37) only know how to communicate through text. Shortly after, I was told by a Millennial that Baby Boomers are demanding and unappreciative. That got me thinking – they both have so much in common, but they don’t listen and tend to interpret the message into their own words.

Now, I belong to Generation X (ages 38-53) and lately I’ve been feeling a bit stuck in the middle of these two large demographic groups. It is exhausting being their mediator, so here are some tips you may want to consider:

Tips for Baby Boomers

  • Appreciate and take advantage of the energy and curiosity of a Millennial. They can likely do a task quicker via an app or a Google search. Try and get sucked into their energy and world, it could be fun!
  • Engage them! Millennials are more than an employee or an annoying team member, they want to feel that there is meaning in their life and job and be heard (so listen!). Instead of “Yes, but…” try “Yes, and…” – it is a sure way to show you are open to their ideas.

Tips for Millennials

  • Take advantage of the wisdom and experience the Baby Boomers have. They were young once and may give you a different perspective to consider.
  • Consider communicating to the Baby Boomer in their preferred method, not yours. Improve your influence factor by learning how to present to a different demographic in a way they understand. Use the original Facetime perhaps? Do your homework and when making a ‘pitch’ be professional, present all sides of the argument, and talk facts, not feelings.

Tips for All

  • Respect goes both ways. Be sure to ask questions, learn and never assume.
  • Clarify and confirm what you have discussed. For example:
    • “Just to clarify, you want me to begin the research project today and get back to you with an estimated completion date by tomorrow at the end of day?” OR
    • “Regarding our last meeting and discussion, I have thought further about working from home and I understand the policy as it relates to my role. I want to confirm that you are aware that I won’t be working in the office two days a week. I’ll start this program next Tuesday.”

Good communication always starts with a conversation, whether it be in person, phone, email or text. Either demographic can start the dialogue, but let’s start it and leave the Gen Xers out of it for a while.

Some of the Best IT Jobs are in Canada’s Financial Sector

 

Frances McCart By Frances McCart,
Vice-President, Business Development at Eagle

Interested in a Technology Career in the Banking Industry? Get an Exclusive Invitation to a Networking & Hiring Event in Toronto

Some of the Best IT Jobs are in Canada's Financial Sector

Forget everything that you thought you knew about working in a big bank’s Technology Group. The financial world has changed and FinTech is driving the way they do business!

The traditional banking model is undergoing massive change. Banking clients expect more from their banks than ever before so getting the right technology in place is more critical now than ever. Being ahead of the game in technologies including AI, mobile apps, data analytics and cloud computing is a huge differentiator for banks and is essential in gaining an edge over their competitors.

In the past, banks followed and implemented the latest technologies as they were released. Now, Canadian banks are actively involved in building the latest technologies. Rather than sitting on the sidelines and waiting, they’re putting themselves at the forefront of change by getting involved with technology labs like CommunitechMaRS Discover DistrictOneEleven and DMZ.  Several banks have also launched digital factories and innovation labs of their own to help cultivate ideas that address clients’ needs, as well as streamline processing all with a focus on technology.

Eagle works with all of Canada’s top banks and in the past year, we have seen a massive influx of both contract and permanent opportunities with their technology groups.  The focus has changed from merely acquiring the latest technology to leading technology innovations. Banks offer ambitious techies the opportunity to lead the way with new developments in AI and blockchain, and be part of creating new software.

For instance, many banks are employing an increasing number of data scientist and data engineers.  The engineers and developers work in an active DevOps environment where code can be deployed in months… and sometimes even weeks.  The technology world, in large part due to FinTech, has changed and the Banks are evolving with it. Teams are agile and work in cross functional groups. The technology environment within today’s banks resembles the environments traditionally associated with Silicon Valley companies such as Google.

There are great career opportunities at all of Canada’s major banks.  Many offer hard core technology resources the chance to be part of a culture shift and take their career to the next level, while being supported by institutions with long histories and sound financial backing.

Eagle is currently working with a major banking client to build an exclusive guest list for an upcoming IT networking and hiring event. As well as the opportunity to meet with the organization’s top hiring executives, attendees will enjoy the opportunity to hear from an industry-leading Big Data guest speaker and will gain preferred access to current full-time job openings in the data space. For the opportunity to attend this event, complete this quick online form.

Exciting times are ahead within the technology groups in all of Canada’s major banks.  When you consider your next job move, take a fresh a look at this exciting industry.  You may find your own little part of Silicon Valley on Bay Street.

Related Articles

Customer Service – A Challenge for the Service Industry

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

A common challenge for any company in the service industry is building and maintaining strong, positive customer service. One airline in Canada recently sent out an email campaign thanking us for voting them the “best airline in North America, again.” I won’t mention names, but think about ANY airline that you know – there is so, so, so much room for improvement with all of them. You’d think that if they wanted to be honest, they wouldn’t say they were the best airline industry in North America, instead they’d use the slogan “we suck less!”

Staffing agencies struggle with this as well – yet we absolutely offer legitimate value in the service we provide. Without staffing companies, hiring would be extremely inefficient. Our industry’s intense focus on this one aspect results in our use of people, processes, and technologies that wouldn’t be cost-effective for individual companies to purchase/hire. The staffing industry saves our economy millions of dollars vs. what would need to be spent if there were no agencies. And from the consultant’s perspective, it is very hard to work on assignment and still find time to market themselves. Agencies have insight into opportunities that would be near impossible to find on their own.

Yet, our industry has an image problem. We are often seen as a “necessary evil”, rather than being embraced as a partner. As hard as we try, we are not able to please everyone all the time. Some relationships become strained and the result is dissatisfaction. At Eagle we try to be as reasonable as possible. But we still have a business to run, staff to pay, and technology in which to invest. We make it a point not to take advantage of people, but we cannot allow people to take advantage of us either. We try to set realistic expectations with both clients and consultants and do what we can to remain true. Sometimes business realities change and make it impossible to hold the line set. But when this happens we try our best to work through things with as much fairness and transparency as possible.

Eagle is ISO 9001:2015 certified, meaning that we have a quality framework that we use to manage our business and that the management team and staff are knowledgeable about our processes and committed to delivering quality always. Part of being certified is measuring how we are doing against our quality goals. For this we conduct monthly surveys with both our consultants and our clients to solicit feedback – what we’ve done well, what we’ve done poorly, and we look for opportunities to make our processes even better. All in all, this has worked well for us over the years.

However, the staffing industry, despite having strong industry associations such as ACSESS and the NACCB, requires no/limited licensing or certification requirements to participate. Anyone can hang a shingle on their door and they are a recruiter. Published codes of ethics for agencies exist and most follow the code set out by ACSESS, but they are not compulsory. Here at Eagle we have also implemented our own code of ethics. But a few bad apples can spoil things for all.  A case in point is the new “protective legislation” that the Ontario Government has put into place. The legislation is meant to protect at-risk temp workers, but as is often the case, the unintended consequences result in burdens on our industry and in some cases, the legislation actually hurts the very people that they were intending to help.

And what about incorporated consultants and contractors? They provide a service too. Their company is part of the service industry and has many of the same customer service challenges. If a consultant contracts directly to the end-client (a practice that has seen dramatic reductions thanks to some of the government legislation and CRA deemed-employee rules) then their client is the company that they work for. If, however, a consultant works through an agency then they have two clients – the agency who hired them and the company at which they are providing their services. Do contractors think of the agency as their client? Do they treat their agency as they would with other clients? The most successful consultants work in partnership with their agencies, coordinating and collaborating to find lucrative and successful engagements. These contractors are re-engaged by the agency for other opportunities as often as possible. Consultants offering poor customer service are not.

The service industry can be exciting, fast-paced, and rewarding. But it is hard as well. Any services-based company relies on their reputation to win new and (especially) repeat business and a big part of this is the level of customer service that is provided. This is important to Eagle as evidenced by our extensive investment in and commitment to our ISO quality standards. Managing a services business, regardless of its size, requires one to treat both customers and suppliers well. This is true for all companies within the Service Industry – airlines, staffing agencies, and for independent incorporated contractors alike.

Job Hunting – The Devil is in the Details

Kelly Benson By Kelly Benson,
Branch Manager at Eagle

Job Hunting - The Devil is in the DetailsThey say that you never get a second chance to make a first impression and there is so much truth to that in the hiring process.  While there are a lot of different ways that a job seeker can differentiate themselves from the pack when applying for roles, one surprising differentiator is an attention to detail.

In the past 20 years, I have seen some great resumes, some terrible resumes and a lot that fall somewhere in between.  I once had a client compare receiving a resume to going on a first date and it was a comparison that I have never forgotten… one would never go on a first date without a little extra effort, so it stands to reason that we should do the same to impress a potential client or employer.

Here are a few quick tips to craft a great first impression through the application process:

  1. Avoid Senseless Mistakes– review your resume for typos, grammatical errors and inconsistent tense. When hiring managers receive a high number of applicants, often the first round of candidates to be eliminated are those that don’t make a great first impression because of grammar or spelling errors.
  2. Follow the Application Instructions– instructions in a posting are the first step in the evaluation process and small “traps” are often included to catch people who might “skim”.  If you are asked for a cover letter, produce one.  It will be used to evaluate both your written communication skills AND your ability to follow instructions.
  3. Customize Your Resume– focus on the role that you are interested in and match the relevant details in your resume to the job posting, but don’t duplicate the job posting.  The author of the job posting wants to see your experience and professionalism – they do not want to see their work plagiarized.
  4. Fact Check– make sure everything on your resume is accurate.  If you share any links (portfolio, websites, LinkedIn, etc), make sure they work as expected. Also, keep in mind that background, employment and education verifications are very common – in addition to traditional references.
  5. Google Yourself– you should expect that you will be searched at some point in the hiring process and often it is earlier than you think.  Do you need to clean up your social profile or adjust privacy settings?

Once your resume lands you the interview, here are some tips on how to knock the interview out of the park.

IT Industry News for June 2018

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on July 11th, 2018.

This is my 30,000-foot look at events in the ICT industry for June 2018. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of June in previous years

Tech NewsFive years ago, in June 2013, Salesforce.com purchased marketing technology company ExactTarget for $2.5 billion, which was the big buy of the month. Other acquisitions included Irish mobile company Three’s purchase of O2 Ireland for $780 million; SanDisk paid $307 million for SMART Storage Systems; Cisco bought Composite Software for $180 million; IBM bought cloud company SoftLayer Technologies; and Buytopia.ca was on a spree with six acquisitions in the last year.

June 2014 included some significant deals announced, with Oracle paying $5 billion for Micros Systems; Sandisk paid $1.1 billion for solid state storage company Fusion-io; and Google continued its push into home automation, witnessed by its subsidiary Nest paying $550 million for cloud-based home monitoring service Dropcam. Google itself paid $500 million for Skybox Imaging, a satellite maker to enhance the Google Maps capability. Twitter paid $100 million for mobile marketing platform Tap Commerce and Red Hat paid $95 million for eNovance.

In June 2015, Intel paid $16.7 billion for semiconductor company Altera Corp. Cisco paid $635 million for security firm OpenDNS in addition to picking up OpenStack company, PistonCloud Computing. Microsoft bought 6Wunderkinder, maker of task management app Wunderlist; Ricoh Canada bought Graycon Group, a professional services firm headquartered in Calgary; and finally, IBM bought OpenStack company Blue Box Group.

June 2016 was certainly an interesting month, with the Brexit vote upsetting the markets and causing uncertainty; and there was plenty of M&A activity. The big deal was undoubtedly the Microsoft purchase of LinkedIn for a whopping $2.6 billion. There were other billion dollar deals that month too: Salesforce paid $2.8 billion for e-commerce platform maker Demandware and Amazon announced an extra $3 billion investment in its India operations. Other significant deals included Daetwyler Holdings AG paying more than $877 million for Raspberry Pi maker Premier Farnell Plc; Red Hat paid $568 million for API management software company 3Scale; and OpenText paid $315 million for HP’s Customer Communication Management products. Other noteworthy deals included an investment group’s purchase of Dell’s software arm; Microsoft bought natural language start up Wand Labs; and Samsung bought cloud computing company Joyent. Also, Google Capital announced its first investment in a public company, investing $46 million in Care.com, an online personal services marketplace platform.

June 2017 saw Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods for $13.7 billion. Westcon-Comstar’s American business was being bought by Synnex for approximately $800 million. US fintech provider, Fiserv, purchased British financial services technology firm, Monitise for $88.7 million. Microsoft purchased Israli cloud startup, Cloudyn, for a price between $50 million and $70 million. Rackspace acquired TriCore in an effort to increase their business from customers who want help running their critical applications. Ebix Inc. entered into a joint venture with Essel Group while acquiring a majority stake in ItzCash for $120 million.

Which brings us back to the present

June 2018 saw a fair bit of M&A activity, the biggest deal seeing Synnex pay $2.43 billion for call centre company Convergys and AT&T pay $1.6 billion for advertising tech company AppNexus. Palo Alto Networks is paying $300 million for Security company Evident.io; PayPal is shelling out $120 million for fraud detection startup Simility; Splunk is paying $120 million for incident management platform company VictorOps; Ribbon Communication is paying $120 million for Edgewater Networks; and Sharp is paying $36 million for Toshibas PC business. Other companies out shopping include Cisco who bought WiFi analytics company July Systems; IBM bought maintenance and repair company Oniqua and Shopify bought app company Return Magic.

Skills shortages were a theme around the world as hiring plans in most countries are positive. Confidence is high in many economies, including Canada’s despite the storm clouds surrounding NAFTA negotiations and the trade war with the US. Speaking of the US, their economy continues to roll along with very favorable indicators almost everywhere.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month, the full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website. Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the July 2018 industry news in just about a month’s time.

Walk Fast and Smile.