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You Need to Listen to Your Recruiter

You Need to Listen to Your Recruiter

No, we are not implying that recruiters are always right and you should always do what they say. Instead, we’re stressing how important it is to actively listen to your recruiter, not just hear what they’re saying.

Exemplary listening skills take practice to perfect and when you excel at it, you’ll find more success and build better relationships. If we examine just the interactions you have with recruiters through your IT contracting career, active listening can make a massive difference. For example:

  • When you truly hear and understand the description of a job and the environment, you know that the job will be right (or wrong) for you.
  • When you listen carefully to a recruiter telling you about a client project, you have a better interview with the client because you understand their situation.
  • When you understand everybody’s concerns, situations and expectations, you increase your bargaining power when negotiating a rate.
  • When you listen properly during a heated situation, you appear more polite and professional, plus you improve the chances of a positive resolution.

When you’re a good listener, you build better relationships and have an easier time winning contracts. It’s that simple!

Business Insider recently put together a list of 7 things great listeners do that set them apart and it’s a perfect summary of simple steps you can take to improve your job search and relationship with a recruiter.

  1. They Self Regulate: Regardless of triggered emotions, great listeners moderate their strong reactions and encourage the other person to keep talking. When a recruiter is giving you feedback — maybe they’ve reviewed your resume or they’re passing on performance feedback from the client — your instincts might be to defend your position. Instead, bite your tongue and hear them out so you can learn and improve.
  2. They Treat All Perspectives as Valid: Certainly, there are undisputable facts in life, but a person’s perception based on their experience and point-of-view is never wrong. Understanding perspective is valuable when resolving any conflict, as well as negotiating rate. While you may not agree with your recruiter’s arguments or justifications, knowing what brought them to their stance will make it much easier to find common ground and a win-win solution.
  3. They Check for Understanding: This is key when learning about an opportunity. You’d hate to go through the application process only to realize close to the end that this job isn’t for you. Or even worse, show up on your first day of the contract only to learn that there was a miscommunication and the gig is not what you thought it was. If there is any doubt, restate what the recruiter just told you, but in your own words. They can then clear-up any misunderstanding.
  4. They Ask Clarifying Questions: Assumptions are dangerous. Instead of shrugging your shoulders and assuming you understand, be curious and follow-up with more questions. Which specific location is the work being done? How long will it be before you get an answer from the client? What exactly does the client environment look like? What requirement are you missing that prevents the rate from going any higher?
  5. They Listen with Their Eyes as Well as Their Ears: Watch your recruiter during an interview to gauge their reactions to your responses. They might not verbally tell you that your response lacked detail, but facial expressions or tone of voice will indicate that something’s missing. Use that opportunity to ask if they need clarification and improve your answer.
  6. They Make Sure Everyone is Heard: When Business Insider raised this point, it was to point out the quiet people in a meeting whose voices aren’t being heard. This advice is also relevant for the two-person relationship between you and your recruiter. Give them time to speak in all situations — when you’re discussing opportunities, client issues, or just getting to know each other. Be aware if you tend to be overbearing in conversation, and consciously stop to listen.
  7. They Note What’s Not Said: Intentionally or accidentally, when a recruiter leaves out pertinent information, it leads to misunderstandings that can drastically affect your career. Note when a job description lacks details that are typically included in other postings. Recognize what’s being glossed over too quickly when the recruiter presents an opportunity. Then ask about it and ensure the answer is what you need it to be.

There is no arguing that listening and communication requires two people but unfortunately, you only have control over yourself. You can help your recruiter improve their listening by being patient and thorough with their follow-up questions, being cognizant of your body language and tone of voice, and slowing down to make it as easy as possible for them to hear what you’re saying.

Can you be a better listener? The answer for everyone is almost definitely “Yes”, we just need to identify where to start.