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Dating Advice for your Job Search: 8 things you should NEVER do after a first date (or job interview)

Dating Advice for your Job Search: 8 things you should NEVER do after a first date (or job interview)

You gotta love that feeling after a successful job interview for a gig that you really want. Leaving the meeting knowing that there was a genuine connection, they know that what you’re offering is exactly what they need and you know that their project is exactly what you’ve been looking for. Unfortunately, you’re not the only fish in the sea, so as much as you’d like them to pick you right away, the reality is, they need to look at all their options before making their final decision.

The scenario is like that of a first date, so what better place to get your next steps than a dating professional? The dating website eHarmony published a post outlining what you should never do after a first date and it perfectly aligns with what you should never do after a job interview.

1. Go text crazy

Text, email or phone. A follow-up afterwards to thank them for their time is great, but then leave it alone and wait for your recruiter to get in touch with you. If a week or two goes by without hearing anything, it’s definitely alright to follow-up. Just like dating, ghosting is rude and no ethical recruiter will intentionally do it to you.

2. Over analyze

The past is over and you can’t control it. Rehashing every response you gave and wishing you’d said something else won’t change anything. Some interview advice does recommend that you can clarify in your follow-up email, but aside from that, stressing about it is futile. The only way to know If they liked you is by waiting for the recruiter or client’s response.

3. Add them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, pin to their Pinterest board…

Add them to LinkedIn with a brief thank you message, and you should already be following the company’s social media pages, but it stops there. Most hiring managers and recruiters save their Facebook and Instagram accounts for personal relationships. Stocking them through those networks is slightly creepy and over-stepping a boundary.

4. Tell yourself you’ll be single [or unemployed] forever

A terrible interview is disappointing, especially if it’s one that you really wanted to work out. That said, self-doubt and negative talk about your future is not going to help you move forward. It’s important to keep a positive frame of mind so you can continue with a successful job search.

5. Act like you’re in a relationship

A great interview with a recruiter is fantastic and it is safe start building a business relationship. You will get to know each other better and the recruiter will send you job opportunities as they arise. But, the eHarmony article states that you need to know the difference between ‘dating’ and ‘in a relationship’. If we compare this to your recruitment agency relationship, it’s important to understand that just because they like you and you’re on their radar, it doesn’t guarantee they will have a job for you. That stage of the relationship might take some time to get to.

6. Cut off all contact with other matches

We always encourage IT contractors to build relationships with multiple staffing agencies. As per the previous point, no single recruiter will be able to help you 100% of the time. Even if there’s one you really like, continue to keep in contact with others. When you’re on contract, continue to meet with recruiters to ensure you’re set-up for the next gig. Polygamous relationships are not only socially acceptable in IT contracting, but strongly encouraged.

7. Tell your friends & family you’ve met The One

Recruiters need to present their clients with top candidates who they can guarantee will be available if chosen. After you complete a successful interview, refrain from jumping the gun and telling other recruiters that you’ve got a contract confirmed because that will diminish any chance of them submitting you to other roles. If that job you think you had falls through, you’ll suddenly find yourself with no leads at all.

8. Play games

Recruiters and clients have work to get done and don’t have time for your games. Be upfront in telling them about other opportunities you’re considering if they give you a job offer, be fair and open during rate negotiations, and stick to your commitments. Similarly, lying about other opportunities to try and speed up the process or adjust your rate is also an unethical game that, when discovered, will stop any future opportunities from that recruiter.