Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: interviews

20 Great Job Interview Tips from 3 Great Sources

When it comes to job interviews, you can never get too much help. Once again, we’ve rounded up the latest tips from some of the most experienced sources when it comes to developer jobs and interviews.

Glass Door’s Job Interview Checklist

Job InterviewGlassdoor is a leader in reviewing companies’ cultures and helping people find jobs at organizations with the best fit. That’s why we’re starting with their interview checklist that guides a job seeker through the process, from the second you get the interview to the days following it.

  1. Study for your interview like it’s a final exam
  2. Generate a list of potential interview questions (and their answers!) beforehand
  3. Write out answers to every question you anticipate, and practice delivering them out loud
  4. Compare your skills and experience to the job description
  5. Be rested and healthy for the big day
  6. Dress for success
  7. Empower yourself
  8. Don’t leave any unnecessary unknowns
  9. Keep an interview journal
  10. Follow up

Simple Programmer’s Top Ways to Behave in a Developer Job Interview

Marcell Lipp has five years of work experience as a software developer and blogs about his experience surviving as a programmer. Lipp recently posted on Simple Programmer with these 6 tips for how to behave in a developer interview.

  1. Stay Calm and Confident
  2. Never Lie About Your Knowledge
  3. Evaluate the Company as Well
  4. Don’t Stress Before the Interview
  5. Buy Time During the Interview
  6. Try Your Best and Be Prepared for Your Interview

Lessons Learned from Dice’s Horror Stories

Dice published a semi-humourous/semi-horrifying article with horrible stories from tech interviews. With each story came a lesson and these are four extremely relevant ones for any technology professional.

  1. Prepare for high pressure
  2. Don’t lie about skills and experience
  3. Never argue… even if you’re right
  4. Don’t Bring Your Parents

Noticeably, many of the tips and advice repeat within each source, highlighting their importance. Also, these lists merely tease the details and clicking through to any of these links will give you much more valuable advice and information on how you can apply it. If you come across any helpful resources, we’d love to see them so we can continue to share expert knowledge from around the world on the Talent Development Centre with IT contractors and other job seekers.

Looking for Jobs? Have You Prepared Your Elevator Pitch?

Looking for Jobs? Have You Prepared Your Elevator Pitch?Grabbing somebody’s attention and easily explaining a product to them is the first step in any successful sales pitch. As such, sales professionals develop and polish an Elevator Pitch, a speech they can quickly blurt out to any potential client.  Not only does this makes the buyer know exactly what the product is, but also leaves them eager to learn more. As an IT contractor, you’re also always trying to sell your product (you) to your next client, so do you have an elevator speech prepared?

A few years ago we shared an infographic containing 5 simple steps to create your elevator pitch when searching for jobs. As helpful as it is, the design of infographics constrains the fine details so here is some additional information about elevator pitches, how independent contractors can create them for their technology consulting business, and best practices when delivering it.

What Is an Elevator Pitch?

An elevator pitch is a 15-30 second summary or commercial about yourself, the premise being that 15-30 seconds is the time you have to get your point across in an average elevator ride. The ultimate goal is to explain to a recruiter, client, or colleague who you are, why you’re unique and what you can provide. Your elevator pitch comes in handy in multiple situations — job interviews, career fairs, voicemails, resume summaries and networking events.

How Job Seekers Can Create an Elevator Pitch

To achieve the best elevator pitch, you must plan it and improve it over time. Failure to do so can result in disaster. Especially when you’re nervous, an unprepared person can blurt out words out that they never imagined and will later regret. It’s not enough just to think about your elevator pitch, you also have to write it down… and practice it!

The first thing to remember while creating your elevator pitch is to keep it simple. Tell your story and paint a picture that perfectly describes you, but you don’t confuse or distract your listener with too many details. In it’s simplest form, your elevator speech should include your name, your field and what you provide. Depending on the situation, you can also include what you’re seeking, your goals, why they should care, and a request for action.

That’s right! Different situations mean you’ll need to prepare multiple elevator speeches. For example, when at a networking event and meeting somebody for the first time, it would be tacky to immediately jump into a sales pitch that tells your listener why they should hire you and where you’d like to go in your career. On the other hand, when an interviewer asks point blank “Why should we hire you?” they would welcome such a detailed response.

Giving Your Job Search Elevator Pitch

When the time comes to finally introduce yourself and deliver the work of art you’ve prepared, don’t blow it. The delivery is just as important as the preparation. Remember to smile, be confident and have energy. At the same time, though, relax and avoid talking too fast or rambling. Finally, have a business card prepared to hand out afterwards.

A solid elevator pitch is a crucial sales tool for every professional so if you don’t have one, we highly recommend you get started. If you have already created a successful speech, then we’d love to learn more about your process in creating it and what you do to shine above the others. Please share your tips in the comments below!

2017 in Review: Resumes and Job Interviews

More Resume and Job Interview Advice from Recruiters

There is no better place to seek job search advice than from the recruiters who have made a career out of helping people find work. In the past, we've surveyed Eagle's recruiters to bring their insight into how to successfully write a resume and get through a job interview. Of course, there are countless recruiters around the world who are also ready to offer their advice. A recent Glassdoor article provides a last-minute checklist for submitting your best tech resume. It recognizes that searching for jobs in the IT industry is unlike any other industry. As such, it's not possible to follow a lot of the common resume advice and you need to adapt to your surroundings. In the end, it asks 3 simple questions to answer before applying to your next IT job: 1. Does your resume match up with your LinkedIn profile? 2. Is your resume full of quantifiable, concrete, professional achievements? 3. Is your resume easy to read? Even if you've mastered the resume and get yourself in for an interview, the work is not over yet. You have to get past some of the annoying questions that recruiters like to ask and the only way to do so effectively is to practice. To get you started, Business Insider collaborated with 14 real recruiters to come up of this list of their favourite interview questions: 1. Tell me about a time when you were a champion for change or a change agent? 2. Why are you memorable? 3. Tell me about a project you're proud of. 4. What would keep you engaged in this role? 5. What defines success? 6. What sets you apart of other candidates? 7. Can you paint me a picture of the role you'd leave your current position for? 8. Tell me about the people you've managed and where they are now. 9. What do you like about your job? 10. What do you know about our organization? 11. Why did you select this profession? 12. Can you give an example of a time when you solved a complex problem with little or no information to start? 13. What 3 adjectives best describe you? 14. What factors would cause you to consider leaving this role? Many of the questions above are more suitable for a permanent career than an IT contract position; however, they all provide insight into the priorities of a hiring manager and a recruiter. Rather than understand your technical competencies (as crucial as those are) they like to know what motivates you and how committed you will be to your client. Do you have any other specific resume or interview questions? Leave them in the comments below and one of our recruiters will gladly respond!There is no better place to seek job search advice than from the recruiters who have made a career out of helping people find work. In the past, we’ve surveyed Eagle’s recruiters to bring their insight into how to successfully write a resume and get through a job interview. Of course, there are countless recruiters around the world who are also ready to offer their advice.

A recent Glassdoor article provides a last-minute checklist for submitting your best tech resume. It recognizes that searching for jobs in the IT industry is unlike any other industry. As such, it’s not possible to follow a lot of the common resume advice and you need to adapt to your surroundings. In the end, it asks 3 simple questions to answer before applying to your next IT job:

  1. Does your resume match up with your LinkedIn profile?
  2. Is your resume full of quantifiable, concrete, professional achievements?
  3. Is your resume easy to read?

Even if you’ve mastered the resume and get yourself in for an interview, the work is not over yet. You have to get past some of the annoying questions that recruiters like to ask and the only way to do so effectively is to practice. To get you started, Business Insider collaborated with 14 real recruiters to come up of this list of their favourite interview questions:

  1. Tell me about a time when you were a champion for change or a change agent?
  2. Why are you memorable?
  3. Tell me about a project you’re proud of.
  4. What would keep you engaged in this role?
  5. What defines success?
  6. What sets you apart of other candidates?
  7. Can you paint me a picture of the role you’d leave your current position for?
  8. Tell me about the people you’ve managed and where they are now.
  9. What do you like about your job?
  10. What do you know about our organization?
  11. Why did you select this profession?
  12. Can you give an example of a time when you solved a complex problem with little or no information to start?
  13. What 3 adjectives best describe you?
  14. What factors would cause you to consider leaving this role?

Many of the questions above are more suitable for a permanent career than an IT contract position; however, they all provide insight into the priorities of a hiring manager and a recruiter. Rather than understand your technical competencies (as crucial as those are) they like to know what motivates you and how committed you will be to your client.

Do you have any other specific resume or interview questions? Leave them in the comments below and one of our recruiters will gladly respond!

Contractor Quick Poll Results: The worst part about searching for a job

For many, the entire job search process seems aggravating, time consuming, and overall something you’d like to avoid. If you drill down, you may find that it is only one specific task or step throughout the process that you really hate. If you could get rid of it, your stress and frustrations may be relieved.

Last month’s contractor quick poll‘s objective was to understand if there’s a common part of looking for a job that independent contractors hate the most. While more respondents noted that they especially hate having to find the opportunity, there was a clear mix about people’s biggest pain points. We also had a few additions, including government matrices, cover letters and waiting for a response. You can see the complete breakdown below.

Quick Poll Results: What's the worst part about job searching?