Talent Development Centre

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All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to Eagle’s hot jobs.

The Top Jobs, Tech Skills and Programming Languages

A Summary of the Most Popular Lists Featuring 2017’s Hottest Jobs

The Top Jobs, Tech Skills and Programming Languages of 2017Along with ambitious resolutions destined to fail, every New Year promises Top 10 lists published by every blog and media outlet, summarizing the top trends of the previous year and predicting new ones to come (we’re guilty of this ourselves… and have no shame about it either).

One such topic you may have seen is the hottest jobs, tech skills and programming languages. In case you haven’t been able to keep up, we compiled the lists from the industry leaders. Many are based in the United States; however, in our experience, in many industries (especially IT), employment and tech trends carry over to Canada as well.

As you scroll through the lists, you’ll notice one recurring factor — information technology is as hot in 2017 as its been for the past many years. Even in the generic employment lists, IT is in significant demand across all industries.

Fastest-Growing Skills, Q4 2016 (Upwork)

Upwork, arguably the world’s largest freelancing website, releases a quarterly list of the fastest growing tech skills. These were the fastest growing skills at the end of Q4 2016:

  1. Natural language processing
  2. Swift
  3. Tableau
  4. Amazon Marketplace Web Services (MWS)
  5. Stripe
  6. Instagram marketing
  7. MySQL programming
  8. Unbounce
  9. Social media management
  10. AngularJS

Toughest Jobs to Fill (CareerCast)

CareerCast published this list of the most in-demand positions that recruiters and hiring managers have the hardest time filling:

  1. Data scientist
  2. Financial advisor
  3. General and operations manager
  4. Home health aide
  5. Information security analyst
  6. Medical services manager
  7. Physical therapist
  8. Registered nurse
  9. Software engineer
  10. Truck driver

Technical Skills with The Biggest Increases In Demand (Forbes)

Early in 2017, Forbes revealed this list, ranking the top technical skills based on how often they appeared in job descriptions.

  1. Big Data
  2. js
  3. Tableau
  4. NoSQL
  5. Apache Hadoop
  6. HTML5
  7. Python
  8. Oracle
  9. JSON
  10. Salesforce CRM

10 Programming Languages Every Developer Should Learn (Social Hire)

Here’s SocialHire’s list of what they believe are the “crème de la crème of programming languages”:

  1. Java
  2. JavaScript
  3. C#
  4. Python
  5. Swift
  6. Rust
  7. Dart
  8. PHP
  9. Scala
  10. HTML5

Best Jobs in America (Glassdoor)

Glassdoor regularly ranks jobs based on number of job openings, salary and overall job satisfaction rating. These are their results for the United States in 2017:

  1. Data Scientist
  2. DevOps Engineer
  3. Data Engineer
  4. Tax Manager
  5. Analytics Manager
  6. HR Manager
  7. Database Administrator
  8. Strategy Manager
  9. UX Designer
  10. Solutions Architect

Most Promising Jobs of 2017 (LinkedIn)

As the world’s leading professional social network, LinkedIn may be the resource most connected to job seekers and employers alike. This is what they predict will be the most promising jobs this year:

  1. Hospitalist
  2. Pharmacist
  3. Sales Engineer
  4. Site Reliability Engineer
  5. Product Manager
  6. Financial Analyst
  7. Technical Program Manager
  8. Program Manager
  9. Data Engineer
  10. Scrum Master

Best Jobs in America (CNN/PayScale)

CNN and PayScale also created a list of the top careers, that they say have the biggest growth, best pay and most satisfying work. Here are the first 10 from their list of 100 careers:

  1. Mobile Applications Developer
  2. Risk Management Director
  3. Landman
  4. Product Analyst
  5. Information Assurance Analyst
  6. Quality Assurance Coordinator (RN)
  7. Clinical Applications Specialist
  8. Hospital Administrator
  9. Database Analyst
  10. Finance & Administration Director

How Canadian Developers Can Remain Competitive

Brendhan Malone By Brendhan Malone,
Vice-President, Central Canada at Eagle

How Canadian Developers Can Remain CompetitiveLooking for new development skills to remain competitive in your field?  Perhaps Rapid Application Development and Front-End Design are in your future.

An interesting question in mapping out your career and determining what skills are most important for you involves both an evaluation, through research and data analysis, of the current market as well as what is coming next.  None of us have a crystal ball, but there are certain trends and information out there that can give us a better understanding of what is coming.

As the majority of consumers shift to their mobile devices to browse and purchase, so will employers’ demands in the skills they seek. Mobile development is one of the fastest growing environments in IT.  Skills such as Android app development, HTML5, iOS, CSS, JavaScript, and Angular are in such an incredible demand that there is simply not enough people to do the work that is already funded.

Over the last decade we have seen an incredible amount of development work move overseas.  Heavy development lifts are being completed in countries where labour costs are a fraction of what it would cost to do it here. Employers in Canada are no longer looking for consultants to sit behind a desk and code, that work has predominantly left the country.

As the Agile Methodology grows in popularity and consumers move to the mobile space, having the technical skills combined with an understanding of marketing and brand objectives of the end client will make you in high demand. What employers want now are collaborative, creative developers with an acute understanding of marketing and sales objectives who can work in a team environment.

Do you have the skills required to stay competitive and relevant in Canada’s fast-paced development space? If not, it may be time to take an inventory of your skills — hard and soft — and refresh or upgrade those that are lacking.

Quarterly Job Market Update for Q4 2016

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on January 20th, 2017

Canadian Job MarketGeneral Observations: 

From a jobs perspective 2016 finished much as it started, most markets were okay but not great and the oil and gas space was “hurting”.  The oil patch has been hurt not only by the low price of a barrel, but also by the political uncertainty introduced by both provincial and Federal governments that crushes any investment possibilities from private enterprises.  There has been some positive momentum associated with the upcoming Trump presidency, so we shall see how that plays out in the coming months and years.  The Canadian dollar continues to hover around the 75c US mark which makes it more expensive for imports, and Canada imports more than it exports.

The unemployment rate at the end of the year was 6.9%, a slight improvement over the 7% at the end of September, and even better than the 7.1% of this time last year.  During the previous 12 months Canada added 214,000 jobs although the majority of these were part time jobs.

TSXThe stock market continues to be relatively volatile, but perhaps that is the new norm.  For the purposes of this report I focus on the TSX and it has enjoyed a reasonable period of growth over the last year, ending 2016 at around 15,300 points which was currently at around 15,000 points which was more than 200 points better than it ended last year.

picture of an oil rigAs already mentioned the oil patch continues to take a pounding and we don’t anticipate much positive change before 2018.  With oil settling at around $50 a barrel we are not likely to see the start of any major projects although there is some optimism that most of the “bleeding” is done.  Alberta will not attract much private sector investment in the current political climate, particularly when almost any other jurisdiction outside of Canada is more business friendly.

Canadian dollar the LoonieThe Canadian dollar finished 2016 at around 75c US, as opposed to the 70C US it was a year ago.  A weaker dollar is good for the oil patch because they sell in US dollars and most costs are in Canadian dollars.  It is also helpful to our manufacturing sector, because finished goods exported with a weak dollar mean a better profit margin.  However importing raw materials becomes more expensive and generally Canada imports more than it exports so overall a weak Canadian dollar is not good for Canada.

The banking sector is one of the bigger employers in Canada, and the Canadian banks have fared well this year with their stock prices riding high.  They are also prudent money managers and have been very careful with their hiring.  They take full advantage of technology which can mean a reduction is client facing staff as e-banking continues to grow and  even their technology projects have seen very careful hiring this year,

The telecommunications companies are other big employers in Canada and are also very cost conscious.  While they demand the best talent in order to compete, they too, are also careful about keeping employment costs under control, particularly as they are also acquisitive, which can mean a big focus on integration of acquired companies.  Some of the drivers of demand here include the highly competitive nature of the business, investment in infrastructure, technological innovation and a need to plan for a retiring “Boomer” workforce.

The US economy continues to add jobs, but at a reduced rate of about 150,000 per month.  The demand for skills in the US will lure talent from Canada which is good for the individuals but not so good for Canada in the long term.  What has not happened, and is different from previous economic times, is that Canada’s economy has not improved along with US economy, which is one of the indicators of our “new normal” environment.

ConstructionThe construction industry seems to be forever busy, to which anyone trying to get work done will attest.  Despite the slowdown in the big jobs like the oil sands, there appears to be a constant demand caused by infrastructure upgrades in many of our cities and we have the promise of more such work funded by our growing national debt (was that my out loud voice?).

Parliament building in OttawaThe three levels of government in Canada are big employers.  Municipal, provincial and Federal governments employ a lot of people and with the current Federal government it was expected their ranks would grow.  There has been some growth in the Federal payroll, about 40,000 in 2016 but it was expected to be more.  All of these governments are dealing with the issue of a fast retiring upper echelon.  The pensions are so lucrative that large numbers of civil servants are eligible for, and invariably take, retirement at a very early age.  This will create opportunity for new jobs, but will also result in a significant brain drain from our government.

The Canadian Staffing Index is an indicator of the strength of the largest provider of talent in any economy (the staffing industry) and an excellent barometer of the health of Canada’s economy. The reading at the end of 2016 was 96, as opposed to 98 a year earlier.  While that appears to be a drop, it is in effect negligible because there were less work days in December 2016 than a year earlier.

Eagle LogoHere at Eagle we experienced a 10% drop in demand from our clients in 2016 as opposed to 2015.  We also experienced a 4% increase in people looking for work.  This really tells the tale of the Canadian economy in 2016, there are less jobs and more people looking.   Eagle’s world is primarily in the technology space, and while we expect things to pick up in 2017 we expect to see skills shortages start to add to Canada’s economic problems.

 More Specifically:

cn tower The GTA is Eagle’s busiest region, representing about 60% of our business.  Not surprising given its boast as the 4th largest city in North America, containing more than 50% of Canadian head offices and with a population of approximately six (6) million.  This market has remained one of the busier markets in Canada, yet has not been as buoyant as previous years, with banks, telcos and provincial government all just a little slower with their hiring.   We anticipate things to pick up in 2017 and demand for skilled resources to increase substantially.

Eagle’s Eastern Canada region covers Ottawa, Montreal & the “Maritimes”.  While there is a better mood amongst the Federal civil service under the Trudeau government, I can’t say that I share their optimism given his focus on anything but job creation.  We do expect a decent level of demand in the Federal government in 2017, with necessary projects requiring expertise and the steady flow (certainly more than a drip) of talent retiring.  Quebec is enjoying its lowest unemployment rate in some time, and Montreal remains the hub of that activity.  We anticipate that to continue in 2017.  The Maritime Provinces continue to struggle to create employment and we don’t expect much change there.

The Saddledome in CalgaryWestern Canada is of course comprised of the oil patch in Alberta and the rest.  Some provinces have fared better than others, with certainly Alberta taking the brunt of the hit because of its resource based employment.  BC was actually the fastest growing province in Canada in 2016, and Saskatchewan has fared better than other provinces with a business friendly government.  The outlook for Alberta in 2017 is better, but not exciting.  The other provinces should see a reasonable increase in jobs.

The Hot Client Demand.

At Eagle our focus in on professional staffing and the people in demand from our clients have been fairly consistent for some time.  Program Managers, Project Managers and Business Analysts always seem to be in demand. It might just be our focus, but Change Management and Organizational Excellence resources are in relatively high demand too. Big data, analytics, CRM, web (portal and self-serve) and mobile expertise (especially developers) are specializations that we are seeing more and more. On the Finance and Accounting side, we see a consistent need for Financial Analysts, Accountants with designations and public accounting experience plus Controllers as a fairly consistent talent request. Expertise in the Capital markets, both technical and functional, tends to be a constant ask in the GTA.  Technology experts with functional expertise in Health Care is another skill set that also sees plenty of demand.  This demand fluctuates based on geography and industry sectors, so we advise candidates to watch our website and apply for the roles for which they are best suited.

 Summary:

The last year was a tough one in the Canadian economy and we will continue to face challenges into 2017, with carbon taxes, a struggling oil patch, a resurgent but protectionist US economy under Donald Trump and a Federal government more interested in the environment, foreign aid, being recognised on the world stage and anything other than creating a business friendly atmosphere in Canada.

On the plus side for job seekers, there will be growth opportunities afforded by a growing number of retirees requiring replacement, and some sectors that will grow … some which we believe will be the telecommunications, technology, construction, government and the financial sector.

That was my look at the Canadian job market for the final quarter in 2016 and some of its influences.

How’s That Career Path Looking?

Terry Power By Terry Power,
President of NACCB

For the many of us who are connected to Eagle in some way, career opportunities in the Professional space are near and dear to our hearts. Anecdotally, we all feel that opportunities abound. I’m a personal fan of believing we create our own destiny. Feeling good about what we do, believing it matters, and staying positive about the future all go a long ways towards ensuring success. Beyond the positive attitude, Optimistic Futuresome data points help.  Here are some things to feel good about in your chosen career:

  • This past February, the Federal Government placed significant emphasis in its budget on Science, Technology, and Innovation. The Prime Minister went on record saying that continuing to develop professional talent in Canada was crucial to our future competitiveness.
  • If you’re in the Technology space, a recent ICTC study showed that Unemployment rates in technology are roughly 1/2 of the national average. It also noted that more than half (55%) of all ICT jobs now come from non-ICT companies like the banks, telcos, oil and gas, etc. This trend will only continue.
  • The Professional space is also very clearly creating significant opportunities for women. Women are out-pacing their male counterparts as new entrants into the Finance and Accounting space. In technology, the wage gap between genders has rapidly been closing over the last 5 years, and a recent study suggested women are now approaching 95% of the pay rates of their male IT counterparts.
  • I Chair an organization called ITAC Talent, whose focus is on promoting engineering, science and technology to kids. Our members all share the same concern — there simply isn’t enough high-end talent available in Canada and it threatens their global competitiveness.

Finance, Technology, Executive Management Consulting. Regardless of your choice, the future looks so bright you may just want to wear shades!

Introducing Eagle’s Talent Development Centre

Welcome to Eagle's Talent Development CentreWelcome to our new Talent Development Centre! The Talent Development Centre is the direct result of a recent survey where we solicited input from contractors across Canada. We were looking for other ways to help our contracting community and the survey results were clear! Contractors want more information that is specific to their industry and their business.

So we have created this one-stop portal for independent contractors where you can get topical and helpful information that relates directly to your industry and your business. As we build our Centre, you can expect:

Information. Members of Eagle’s Executive Team will be contributing weekly, plus we’ll be making regular posts with information and insight on market trends, business regulations, tips, tools, training resources and everything else that will help your success in the contracting space. We will also invite guest bloggers that will provide information on a variety of relevant topics.

Hot Jobs. Take a look at the “Hot Jobs” section on the left. How is this different from our job board? These are our newest posting and will connect you to jobs where clients need a superstar and they needed them yesterday. They’re opportunities that are updated frequently and they will get you fastest results. They’re your best bet if you’re qualified and immediately available!

Networks. The Networking section on the left will take you to social media forums that are managed by Eagle. Feel free to join the ones that interest you and connect directly with the Eagle Team. Keep an eye on this section too, because we are always building more relevant groups and hangouts across social media.

Subscribe

We know you’re busy so we’ve made it easy for you to follow the latest postings. You can use the form on the left to subscribe to weekly updates with links to our most recent posts. Don’t worry we won’t SPAM you and you can unsubscribe anytime you want.

Questions/Suggestions

The Talent Development Centre is ultimately a resource for independent contractors to build their business. If you have any suggestions about topics you’d like covered, we want to hear from you. Simply leave a comment and let us know what you think!