Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: google

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to Google.

Is Google an Unfair Monopoly?

Google is one of the world’s leading technology companies, viewed as an inspirational innovator to many but as an unethical threat to others. This past Summer, the European Union fined Google 4.3 billion euros for breaking antitrust laws, stating that it abused its Android market dominance. The situation continues to raise additional questions about whether or not Google is a Monopoly and if the government should do more, similar to the Microsoft situation at the end of the 20th century.

This video from CNBC International does a great job of summing up the situation, including whether or not Google is a monopoly and comparing their circumstances to similar ones in history. Do you think there should be more government intervention over Google?

How to Get a Laugh From Your Google Assistant

Smart technology has become increasingly popular today. Many people rely on these devices for news, music and even setting alarms. But you can also have a bit of fun with these smart devices, like Google Home. Google Home is powered by AI and is typically referred to as Google Assistant. A video by TechGumbo highlights the top 100 commands you can give for funny or entertaining responses. So take a break, watch the video and make your Friday even better!

These Brainteasers are Fun (except when they’re asked in a job interview)

Not long ago, Silicon Valley companies were notorious for asking ridiculous and strange job interview questions that they said tested an applicant’s critical thinking abilities. While some technology companies and IT recruiters continue to keep this in their mix, Google and many other leaders have toned it down a bit. Certainly, job interviews at Google remain challenging and nerve-racking; however, there are some questions that proved to be so complicated and unhelpful, that Google stopped asking them.

Check out this video from Tech Insider which reveals a few Google job interview questions (and their answers) that have since moved into the archives.  The challenge is fun but could you survive the pressure of a job interview that included these?

Google Docs CAN Be Helpful… If You Know What You’re Doing

Unless you live under a rock, have an extreme aversion to everything Google or despise cloud technology, you’re already aware of Google Docs. It’s the word processor component of the Google office suite that allows you to create, edit and store documents in the cloud. It doesn’t have the advanced and intelligent technology of MS Word to take its place but it can be a lifesaver in a variety of situations.

If you’re shaking your head right now and in complete denial that Google Docs has a place in your world, then it’s possible you just don’t understand it enough. From basic documents to styles to research, Docs has extensive capabilities and this infographic from WhoIsHostingThis will tell you all about them…

Google Docs Masterclass: The Infographic - Via Who Is Hosting This: The Blog

Source: WhoIsHostingThis.com

Google Calendar Tricks You May Not Know About

Stop using Google Calendar just to keep track of appointments or meetings and take advantage of some great features that can make your life easier and more productive.

Sharing or publishing a calendar can make planning a meeting around another team member’s schedule easier or simply lets your client’s employees know what you’ll be completing for the day. As an independent contractor searching for IT jobs, you can keep track of what staffing agencies you’re in contact with and for what position by scheduling reminders with the email included in the description.

Steve Dotto further explains the five “hidden gems” of Google Calendar in this video from Dottotech.

Google Search Tricks You Didn’t Know About

Google is one of the most powerful tools available to us. A simple Google Search helps you find job opportunities, compare technologies before purchasing them, and research virtually any topic. What’s surprising is that although most of us use Google all of the time, few of us use it to its fullest potential!

TechGumbo will surprise you in this video while teaching you at the same time. They go through 12 Google Search Tricks and at least one of them is sure to change the way you run your next search.

How Google Discovered This Secret to Team Success

David O'Brien By David O’Brien,
Vice President, East Region & Government Services at Eagle

Successful Team CelebratingMost of us, and especially IT contractors, have had a range of experience in dealing with teams, most likely in a work context but not entirely exclusive to work. I would bet we could all cite stories of teams gone sideways and opine as to why. The challenge, though, and hence the real question, is what does make teams successful or work? Why aren’t the best teams just a collection of the top people at the skills needed? Examples abound of this seemingly intuitive notion of “I will simply gather the best developers/salespeople/athletes/actors as needed to make my team win.” As we all know, though, in many of these cases, quite often the whole does not equal the sum of all its parts. Scores of evidence will show the assembly of the highest paid or skilled athletes (see Toronto Maple Leafs, New York Yankees,1980 Russian Olympic Hockey Team vs US) or the multi-chain store that has the same culture, policies and location demographics across its entire chain see huge variances in success in spite of all these commonalities.

Google, arguably the world’s most successful technology company, has a widespread reputation for only hiring the best of the best (just take a look at 41 of Google’s Toughest Interview Questions). In 2012, Google sought to understand what makes teams succeed and created Project Aristotle. The majority of modern work from early education through MBA school, and then on in to the workforce, is done in a group environment, to the extent that time spent in collaboration by employees and managers has ballooned over 50% in the last 20 years.  It is a given today that people are more productive and happier in a collaborative group dynamic. At first, the study, though overwhelmed with data, found that there were no obvious difference makers in terms of types of personality, skills or background that affected successful team outcomes. What they did find, though, as critical were the group “norms”, those unwritten set of criteria, standards and behaviors. There were two very definitive norms that distinguished successful, high functioning teams and they were:

  1. Good teams presented what researchers term a “psychological safety”. That, in effect, means team members on good teams felt free to speak /contribute equally without fear or retribution, and that everyone has an opportunity to speak. As long as everyone had a chance to speak, the team did well; whereas, in teams that were dominated by one person or a small group, “the collective intelligence” declined. This shared safety built by respect and trust was critical to success.
  2. Not surprisingly, good teams all had high “average social sensitivity” or were more empathetic. These teams were made up of people who were adept at reading people’s feelings through things like tone, non-verbal communication and expressions. In other words, the teams had high Emotional Intelligence. Successful team members know when people are upset, whereas people on ineffective teams scored worse, having less sensitivity to others on the team.

What was interesting for the Google researchers was that it was very evident that many of those who may have chosen Software Development as their career did so to avoid “discussing feelings” and were often naturally introverted.

This is a fascinating study that emanated from Silicon Valley, a world dominated by data. These technology professionals now have the data to rethink and reset the course, perhaps in getting away from conventional wisdom.  I encourage you to look into it and draw your own conclusions to perhaps redraw the way you as an independent contractor may operate within teams. As the saying goes: “teamwork makes the dream work.”

Google’s Most Popular Software Technologies

Diversification is a common technique used to reduce risk in many situations — investment portfolios, client lists, services offered — but how diverse is your skill set? Great Software Developers already know that having a variety of tools under their belt makes it easier to land the highest paying contracts. If you’re considering learning something new or brushing up on your skills, have a look at this article by Nick Kolakowski that was recently published by Dice. He reviews the top technologies as listed by Google in 2015.

While terming a particular technology “most popular” is always a problematic endeavor, Google’s gargantuan amount of search data offers some excellent insights into which technologies seized the world’s attention in 2015.

Google’s list of the most-searched software technologies last year included, in descending order:

  1. Java
  2. HTML
  3. Python
  4. JavaScript
  5. SQL
  6. CSS
  7. Adobe Flash
  8. R
  9. C
  10. GO

These rankings should be unsurprising to tech pros and Web developers; the top five technologies, for example, undergird the modern Web.

Further down the list, however, is where things get a little more interesting: Windows PowerShell (a task-automation and configuration management network), Scratch (a visual programming language), and Go (a programming language developed at Google) all made first-time appearances on the list in 2015. Adobe Flash was also new to the list, despite its age; perhaps the increased search volume was due to controversies over the platform’s security, or Adobe’s announcement that it would soon commence HTML5 support for Flash Professional CC.

For Web developers (and pretty much anyone whose job intersects in some way with the Web and mobile), knowledge of Java, HTML, and JavaScript is a given. But giving Go, Scratch, and PowerShell another look in 2016 might be a good idea; if those technologies catch on, they could climb further up the list—at which point, knowing them will be absolutely essential.

Freelancing 101: Professional Networking (Part 2)

This is Part 2 of a post originally published by Justine Smith on the FreshBooks Blog August 19, 2015

Freelancing 101: Professional Networking Made Easy (Part 2)Imagine waking up one morning, checking your email and finding several new leads from interested prospects. Now, imagine experiencing that every morning.

How can this happen? Through the power of professional networking.

When you take the time to build a strong network, that investment will bring results. People start seeing you as an expert and will come to you for services, whether you’re a writer, designer or massage therapist.

But this only happens through successful networking. A strong strategy is a must for keeping you and your business top-of-mind when new opportunities arise.

In the article below, you’ll find a few no-hassle, professional networking tips for freelancers. Use them to build your network, acquire new business and establish yourself as the go-to authority. Let’s dive in…

Craft a Comprehensive Marketing Toolkit

This toolkit will serve as your go-to resource when you land new leads during networking events. It’s essentially a pre-packaged form of sales collateral. Keep some copies in the car or carry some on-hand to make sure you never find yourself without your toolkit when the moment to exchange information strikes.

Ok, so what goes in this pre-packaged marketing toolkit?

Good question. You’ll find an array of choices for printed marketing materials. Some of these include:

  • Business cards
  • Post cards
  • Flyers
  • Booklets
  • Brochures
  • Calendars
  • Greeting Cards
  • Stickers
  • Newsletters

As a freelancer, you can use one or all of these items to creatively promote your business. But for the purpose of this package, try to keep things simple.

Business Cards

This is a no-brainer. Every professional at a networking event will carry a handful of business cards. In fact, you should too, above and beyond the ones you include in your networking toolkit. Then, when someone needs your number, just hand over your business card and set up a time to chat.

But what if a prospect wants to learn more about what you offer? When this happens, it’s time to hand over a bit more information. Your business card is your foundation, but let’s add to it a bit…

Brochures

In addition to the business card, include a brochure that highlights your services, capabilities and accomplishments. If you want, you can even take things a step further by offering a simple discount within the brochure.

When creating your brochure, keep these tips in mind:

  • Write to your target audience.
  • Share benefits, not just features.
  • Get a professional design.

Remember, you want to pass out this toolkit and let it do the selling for you. Do everything possible to create good, high-quality marketing materials.

One Miscellaneous Item

Round out your marketing toolkit with one of the materials left on the list above. This is a miscellaneous item by default, because different materials will work better or worse, depending on your industry.

For example, here are a few different ways you could use this third part of the package:

  • Music Teacher: Include a flyer that features an introductory discount for new students.
  • Writer: Use a newsletter to show off your writing skills.
  • Designer: Print a cool sticker that showcases your best design capabilities.

Once you have the package completed, it’s time to get out there and start building your professional network. Don’t be afraid – everybody gets nervous about networking, but preparation is the key. When you use this system, you’ll make the entire process as “no-hassle” as possible.