Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: freelancing

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to IT freelancing.

2016 in Review: Business of Independent Contracting

2016 in Review: The Business of Independent ContractingIt’s well-known that successful independent contractors are hard workers, experts in their field and know the best ways to keep a steady flow of work. Something often over-looked by an outsider is all of the extra work an independent contractor has to do just to manage their business. Since we know that IT contracting goes beyond searching for jobs and working on projects, the Talent Development Centre is filled with helpful business tips and contracting advice.

Taking the Leap into Independent Contracting

Just getting into contracting can be a scary endeavor, which is why we posted these articles to help IT professionals in that situation:

Managing Your Independent Contracting Business

We also shared these posts to help manage the business once it’s moving:

Inside Scoop from Eagle’s Executive Team

One of the greatest benefits of the Talent Development Centre is the inside scoop we provide from our executives, who work closely with industry associations. As a result, 2016 also saw these policy-related articles:

What did we miss in 2016? Use the comments below to tell us what you want to learn more about next year.

Want to Start a Business While Working Full-Time?

You Can — Just Keep These Tips in Mind

This post by Nellie Akalp first appeared on the Freshbooks Blog on October 20th, 2016

Want to Start a Business While Working Full-Time? You Can—Just Keep These Tips in MindWhether you’re about to venture out on your own as a solo professional or launch a new business, it’s often easier to lay the groundwork while still employed. The stability and steady paycheck associated with full-time employment comes in handy when you’ve got real-world responsibilities like a mortgage and student loans—or you just want to eat something other than ramen every day.

Working on a business or freelancing while still at a full-time job builds your experience, confidence and project pipeline. You get to explore the different aspects of solo work and see if you enjoy wearing all the hats that come along with business ownership. As they say, you need to learn to walk before you can run. And staying employed while you learn the ropes can help you do this.

Balancing a job and a budding business is possible, but it does take some careful consideration—including legal, personal and professional matters. If you’re thinking about starting a business while keeping your day job, here are 5 things to keep in mind.

  1. Check Your Employee Contract

Before you begin taking on side projects, you should become very familiar with your employee contract and/or handbook. Some companies include non-compete clauses, which can mean you aren’t allowed to accept work on the side. The strictest clauses are usually found in ad and creative agencies who don’t want their employees to poach company clients.

Poring over legal fine print is no one’s idea of a good time, but it is essential. If you’re caught breaking the terms of your contract, you can be fired—even sued. Fighting a lawsuit while unemployed isn’t the best way to help get your small business off the ground. So, read your employment agreements carefully. If the wording seems vague, you can decide for yourself whether you’d like to approach your boss or HR for clarification, or keep your plans to yourself.

  1. Give 110% to Your Day Job

No matter how excited you are about your new venture, you’re still committed to your current job and company. It will be obvious relatively quickly if you aren’t holding your own in the workplace. This means staying on top of deadlines, getting to meetings on time, being enthusiastic—basically just doing your job as well as you always have. Underperforming at the office can hurt your professional reputation and long-term prospects.

There’s one important difference now. Since your new business is going to take up most of your spare time, you can’t stay late or work weekends for your “day job.” This means you need to make every minute in the office count. Master the arts of prioritization and delegation in order to get as much done as possible during your normal work hours. These are essential skills for being a freelancer and entrepreneur, anyways.

  1. Create a Disciplined and Regular Routine

There are only 24 hours in a day, so you’ll definitely be feeling a scheduling crunch when you first start out. Try to develop a steady rhythm for working on your new business, setting time aside in the evening, early in the morning and on your days off. Creating a regular schedule will help you stay disciplined. You need to make time to work on the business whether you have projects or not—there’s always important work to do such as creating your business’ website, networking or hustling for new business.

If you are struggling to find time to work on your business, take a careful look at the root cause. It could be circumstantial; for example, you’re just really busy right now for a major project at work, but things will quiet down soon. Self-employment requires a lot of discipline, self-direction and self-motivation. It’s very different than previous experiences with a boss or professor. This means it is important to identify early on if the solo work style is right for you.

  1. Treat Your New Venture as a Legitimate Business

You may still be a full-time employee, but the minute you accept money for your work, you’re also a business owner and entrepreneur. This means you need to treat your side work as a legit business—and learn all the responsibilities that come along with owning a business, including how to organize your finances, report your income and pay your taxes.

This would be a good time to meet with a CPA or tax advisor who is familiar with the needs of small business owners and freelancers. Setting up good practices early will help you scale later. One interesting point is that if you form a business and it takes a loss during the first year, you can actually deduct that loss to offset your income from your regular job (talk to a CPA/tax advisor for the details).

In addition, consider creating a formal business entity (such as a Limited Liability Company) to help lower your personal liability should your side business be sued or can’t pay its liabilities.

  1. Determine When You’ll Dive into Solo Work Full-Time

As your business grows, you’ll surely experience periods of intense work overload. At this point, you will need to decide if it is better to quit your job or turn down new client projects. How do you know if it’s time to start working on your own full time? It’s not an easy question to answer, but here are a few thoughts…

Unless you’re willing to blow through your savings or take out a line of credit, you shouldn’t consider leaving your job until your business can bring in as much income as your current job (or close to it or at least enough to meet your needs). That’s the practical consideration.

In addition, it may be time to rethink your situation if you find yourself so excited about your new business that it’s hard to muster any enthusiasm for your day job. This can drain you personally and professionally and you don’t want to just stick around until your employer kicks you out. If you’re having a hard time going to work each morning, then it’s time to accelerate your new business. Figure out how to build a runway of clients and have some cash flowing in—then take the jump.

About the Author: Nellie Akalp is a passionate entrepreneur, small business expert, professional speaker, author and mother of four. She is the Founder and CEO of CorpNet.com, an online legal document filing service and recognized Inc.5000 company. At CorpNet, Nellie assists entrepreneurs across all 50 states to start a businessincorporateform an LLC, and apply for trademarks. She also offers free business compliance tools for any entrepreneur to utilize. Connect with Nellie on LinkedIn.

Does Calling Yourself a ‘Freelancer’ Hold You Back?

This post by Susan Johnston Taylor first appeared on the Freshbooks Blog on September 28th, 2016

Does Calling Yourself a ‘Freelancer’ Hold You Back? One of the perks of freelancing is choosing your own title. So, what exactly should you call yourself? A freelancer, an entrepreneur, a small business-owner, something else?

In my experience, solopreneurs who choose not to self-identify as freelancers tend to fall into one of two main camps. The first camp chooses some other title to post on social media, print on their business cards and use in their elevator pitch (for instance, “independent web developer,” “creative director for hire” or “entrepreneurial journalist”).

Or they set up a business (for instance, “Sam Smith Media, LLC” or “The Red Pen Unlimited”) officially or unofficially that de-emphasizes their solo status and allows them to call themselves the owner, CEO or similar. In that case, maybe they plan on eventually scaling up to include others or they want to give the impression of being a larger company so they can attract bigger clients.

Here’s a look at the advantages and disadvantages of calling yourself a freelancer.

Advantages of the ‘Freelancer’ Title

Clarity

In certain circles, people will know immediately what you’re all about if you call yourself a freelance web designer or a freelance copywriter. They may not understand what you mean by a “web design ninja” or an “independent content marketing strategist.” That’s especially true of LinkedIn profiles. No client or employer searches LinkedIn for people with cutesy or creative titles like “copywriting maven” or “SEO guru,” so in that context, you’d want more a straightforward professional title that makes it clear what you do.

Camaraderie

Freelancers are a pretty rad tribe of free-thinking, creative people. Self-identifying as a freelancer means you’re part of that community and gives you the ability to tap into the collective wisdom of the tribe through online forums, in-person events and the like. Of course there are also forums and networking events for people who self-identify as solopreneurs or small business-owners, but freelancers tend to share some similarities that they may not share with the broader community of small business-owners who have brick and mortar locations or employees to manage.

Disadvantages of the ‘Freelancer’ Title

Lack of Respect

Alas, some clients just don’t respect freelancers. They may pay their freelancers late (or not at all) or email them at all hours of the day or night assuming the freelancer must have nothing better to do than wait at the client’s beck and call. Calling yourself something other than a freelancer could help establish yourself as a legitimate business entity deserving of greater respect.

Negative Associations

The term can have negative stereotypes for those who assume that a freelancer is someone who couldn’t hack it in the corporate world or who loafs around in pajamas watching daytime soap operas. For most freelancers that isn’t the case, but using a term other than freelancer could help bypass some of these misperceptions and position yourself as a bona fide professional.

Self-Perception

Aside from how others treat you, calling yourself a small business-owner or a solopreneur could also shape the way you think about your own work. If you view freelancing as a casual thing you do in between full-time jobs, you may not behave like a business or charge what you’re worth. But if you think of yourself as a business, then you’re more apt to get agreements in writing, send professional-looking invoices and take other steps that establish you as a business.

Possible Limitations

Some creative professionals grow from freelancing on their own to subcontracting work to others or even creating a virtual digital agency with multiple contractors or employees. If you see yourself as a digital agency of one, then that could create a smoother transition into a larger business in the future. Branding yourself as something other than a freelancer means you won’t have to rebrand when you decide to expand or change how you think about and describe your work. Of course, scaling up isn’t for everyone. Some freelancers are happy to remain a company of one.

Distancing Yourself from Your Work

Some solopreneurs choose to incorporate as a business to provide an extra layer of protection in case there’s a legal dispute around their work. Also, some freelancers define themselves by the success or failure of their work (an unhealthy, but all too common mindset). Using a business name other than your own name could also have the psychological benefit of reminding you that you are not interchangeable with your work.

In my case, I vary my word choice depending on the context. If I meet fellow freelancer, I’m apt to self-identify as a freelancer as well so that we can find common ground. If I’m hobnobbing with other solopreneurs, I might self-identify with that group. Ultimately, I think behaving like a business-owner is more important than what you call yourself.

About the Author: Freelance journalist Susan Johnston Taylor covers entrepreneurship, small business and lifestyle for publications including The Boston Globe, Wall Street Journal, Entrepreneur and FastCompany.com. Follow her on Twitter @UrbanMuseWriter.

 

The Pros and Cons of Being an IT Freelancer

We’ve preached many times on the Talent Development Centre that independent contracting, or freelancing, can have great benefits for technology professionals. We’ve also discussed the complex decision to remain an employee or become an independent contractor. We recently came across this related and informative infographic from Graphic Design Degree Hub. It does a great job of summarizing the pros and cons of freelancing in any industry, including IT systems support, software development and project management. If you’re currently considering becoming an independent contractor, then this graphic is for you!

The Pros and Cons of Being a Freelancer

The New Gig Economy for Baby Boomers

Frances McCart By Frances McCart,
Vice-President, Business Development at Eagle

The New Gig Economy for Baby BoomersThe Globe and Mail recently published an article about all the buzz around the new “gig” economy, and how it is not just for millennials.

A ‘gig economy’ is defined as “an environment in which temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent work for short-term engagements.”

This article highlights the fact that senior level resources and recently retired executives are now realizing the opportunities that are now present due to the “gig” economy and how they may benefit from them.

Eagle began to see the need to provide clients with access to senior resources (on either an interim or consulting basis) who have left their traditional roles in industry.  Over the past 5 years, since launching the Executive and Management Consulting (EMC) division, we have seen the talent pool of industry experts and former management consultants virtually explode.

Clients are realizing that they can now access these subject matter experts and strategic resources without going the traditional route of engaging a consulting firm.  The resources that we work with bring a depth of expertise and professionalism to a client that often exceeds what they can access through other consulting and sourcing channels – and at a fraction of the cost.  These resources typically bring at least 15-20 years of hands on experience managing large business transformation related projects, or have deep subject matter advisory expertise.

Clients have started to understand the large untapped talent pool of resources who are keen to work and have discovered what an asset they are to their organization.  These resources not only bring in-depth expertise to the client, but an incredible work ethic.  The baby boomer “gig” economy is a fast growing demographic with thousands of people entering the economy every year.  Most candidates that we have spoken to are excited about the opportunities in the market, often not limiting their work to their home city or country.  The key to anyone entering the next stage of their career is to take the time to plan what is most important to you and how to market your new brand into the marketplace.

The Benefits of Being an Independent Contractor (Video)

It’s no secret to our readers that independent contracting has a number of benefits, as well as some risks that go with it. If you’re new to this, and still exploring the idea of freelancing, whether in IT or any other field, then take a couple minutes to watch this video from Xero Accounting Software. Ryan Baker of Upsourced Accounting discusses the benefits and challenges associated with being your own boss.

If you still have questions, feel free to leave them in the comments below or get in touch with your favourite recruitment agency.

How to Start a Successful Career as a Freelancer

Starting out as a freelancer or independent contractor can be stressful. On top of many tasks that need to get done, there’s part of you that can’t stop worrying about whether or not you’ll be successful, or if you’ll have to go back to your old boss to retrieve your permanent job.

Thankfully, we found this simple infographic on Lifehack. It provides basic tips on how to get started, how to price yourself and how to work with new clients. Review it and, if you have any more specific questions, please leave them in the comments below and we’ll be happy to answer them for you.

How to Start a Successful Career as a Freelancer

by Fiverr.

From Visually.

3 Things Freelancers Never Worry About

This post by J. Melissa Cooper first appeared on the Freshbooks Blog on October 1, 2015

3 Things Freelancers Never Worry AboutFreelancers enjoy many luxuries that traditional full-timers don’t get to experience. But if you’re stuck in the office right now, you may be talking yourself out of freelancing because you’re just not sure whether the benefits are all they’re cracked up to be.

To help you decide whether freelancing is right for you, here’s a quick list of things freelancers never have to worry about that might help you make your decision:

  1. Showing Up at 8 a.m.

Freelancers are masters of their own schedules.

If you’re a freelancer and you have a big project that requires extra time, you can wake up early or stay up late to get it done. What’s even better is that you can finish that project in your home office, on your couch, or at the kitchen table. You’re not restricted to an office building.

  1. Retirement Structures

The traditional “work 40 years, retire, live off your 401(k), and then travel” model doesn’t sit well with everyone, and I’ve found that bucking the norm is a great reason to become a freelancer.

If you don’t want to wait to collect your retirement money and would rather take vacations now, then why not freelance? You won’t be tied to a set retirement structure that may not work with your goals.

You’ll have the final say about where your money goes — and when.

  1. Workflow Management

Corporate workers are bound to the constantly growing stacks of paper on their desks, but freelancers aren’t. They determine which projects they want to take on and which they turn down.

Freelancers in the service industry get to pick and choose what works for them because there are only so many hours in a day. Unlike their corporate counterparts, they truly don’t have to take on every project.

Overcoming Common Objections

You may now be thinking, “Freelancing sounds great, but it’s too expensive.” Not true.

Starting a website, hanging a digital shingle and acquiring customers isn’t costly at all. And technology has made launching freelance operations easier and cheaper than ever before.

For example, setting up your business is as simple as going to the secretary of state’s website, filling out the required form online, and paying a small fee. You’re done: No expensive attorneys or antiquated forms are necessary.

When it comes to setting up a website: you don’t have to rely on expensive firms to build and code your website. Lots of companies will do it all for a low monthly cost — or even for free. Look around and find the option that works best for you.

You might also be thinking that marketing is difficult or expensive. Again, these things have never been easier. The explosion of social media over the past five years has streamlined the process of getting your name out there.

Create a strong online presence through Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and your own website, and look into your advertising options on social networks and search engines.

Wait to join the freelancing sector until you’ve proven that you can pay the bills with your freelancing career. See how much you can make on the side, and project it across a 40-hour-per-week period.

If you can pay your bills and taxes and still put some money in savings, then it’s freelance time.

This may not be the exciting “jump in” advice that entrepreneurs want to hear, but you have to play it smart at the beginning to set yourself up for success down the road.

Additionally, consider how much time you spend thinking about your side project. If you’re more focused on your freelance work than your real job, then it’s time for freelancing.

Once you find something you’re passionate about, work turns into joy, so chase that passion.

About the Author: J. Melissa Cooper is a freelancer, net entrepreneur, and micro-enterpriser. She has dedicated  her career to all facets of the job market and organizational effectiveness. She started her first company with $700 and a VoIP phone and within five years grew it to more than 400 virtual workers and sold it for several million dollars. A dual-certified HR professional holding both the SPHR and PHR designations, Melissa is a recognized human resources expert and has over nine years of experience in the field.

How to Freelance with a Full-Time Job

This post by Elana Gross was originally posted on The Skillcrush Blog on June 2nd, 2015

How to Freelance with a Full-Time JobThe other day I was at dinner with extended family when someone asked me how many jobs I have.

I get it. While I only have one full-time job, I am also a freelance writer and a blogger. And while my “day job” is working as a content strategist, I view my work life as comprised of personal undertakings as well.

Managing my blog and writing freelance articles are projects that I take seriously and, while I love writing, the work itself can take up a lot of time. I have to regularly concept and pitch articles, write articles and posts, and manage brand partnerships and relationships.

It can be tricky to find the balance between working your full-time job and pumping life and energy into your freelance or side work.

First of all, there’s the fact that you only have so many hours to work with, and so much brain power to contribute. Everyone has to rest! And not to mention, you have to watch out for issues like conflicts of interest, non-compete contracts, and colliding deadlines. For example, if you created a special way of setting up a JavaScript menu at your full-time job, you might not be allowed to use that same menu with your private clients. Or if you have a major deadline at your full-time job AND in your freelance work, you’ll have to choose to prioritize one or the other.

I’ve found that the keys to freelancing with a full-time job are transparency, passion, time management, drive, and, perhaps most importantly, coffee.

  1. Be transparent:

I was hired at my current job because of my experience blogging, my writing skills, and my ability to create and cultivate an online presence. The fact that I could do it on my own was a good indication that I could do the same thing for clients.

Throughout the hiring process, and on my first week on the job, I was really transparent about the fact that I was actively growing my blog and freelance writing portfolio. I asked if that would be a problem and learned that it wouldn’t be at this job.

You should also always read the fine print before signing anything. It’s crucial to check if anything you take on could be in violation of a non-compete or similar contract.

I work at an agency where we represent a wide range of clients in multiple industries. I am always careful to evaluate and ask if there is a conflict of interest with one of my articles, blog posts, or brand partnerships. If I think there could be a problem, I ask right away. As a result, I’ve had to stop blog series, say no to a partnership, or go back to the drawing board on a post, but it’s always worth it because I respect the agency and our clients.

The takeaway? If you’re not sure, always bring the question to your employer.

  1. Love what you do:

I am incredibly passionate about growing my blog and my freelance writing career. I am also passionate and energized by my job as a content strategist. This passion has been pivotal to my success thus far. When you are freelancing with a full-time job you’re likely to work late nights, early mornings, and weekends. If you’re passionate about what you’re doing you’ll have a much greater likelihood of success, in part because you enjoy what you do, and in part because you are willing to put in the hours. That’s where the coffee comes in handy.

Also, if you truly love your work, you’re likely to find that both your full-time work and your freelance work feed into each other, so growing and putting time into one doesn’t take away from the other. If you are a digital marketer in the day and build websites as a freelancer, chances are you’ll learn skills and get insights from each experience you can apply to the other. So it really pays to love BOTH your full-time job and your freelance work.

I feel fortunate to work at a job that allows me to also pursue my writing and blogging career. I’ve found that my writing and marketing outside of work makes me better at my job. I am constantly learning about new industries, fostering relationships, being creative, and making my writing stronger. My theory has always been that my full-time job comes first but I know that I’m lucky to be somewhere where I can also focus on other things – on my own time.

  1. Stay on schedule:

I write almost all of my blog posts on Sundays and schedule them to go up throughout the week. I like scheduling my content ahead of time so that I can get together with friends, go to networking events, try a fun gym class, go to a museum, and work on pitches, freelance writing, and career profile questions and outreach throughout the week. I also wake up between 6:15 and 6:30 am almost every day so that I can “Wake up an hour early to live an hour more.” It can be really difficult to get into the habit of getting out of bed between 6:15 and 6:30 a.m. every day but it gets easier and, in time, becomes a good habit. Due to my early morning routine, I find I am more focused, happy, and alert when I get into the office. It’s crucial to make time for the people and activities you love – otherwise the hard work isn’t worth it.

If the work you’re doing on the side involves sticking to a strict schedule, like freelance web design, the key will be to plan far in advance, and always let your clients know if you’re going to miss a deadline. It helps if you don’t plan to do more than seems possible, and of course, never plan to work on your own private projects during the hours of your full-time job.

  1. Get after it:

If you’re going to focus on side projects along with your full-time job, you have to make it clear that you will give 110% at work. I think that if you do great work and consistently exceed expectations, your company will be more accepting of your side project. Do great work and show that you’re willing to put in the hours and the effort.

This same drive and ambition will help you be better at your side projects. When you’re freelancing, building a blog, or building a business, you have to be your own boss. As with anything, there are going to be some parts that energize and excite you and some that don’t. Stay motivated by remembering why you started in the first place…then get a big cup of coffee and get back to work.

And if you aren’t sure if you should even TELL your boss about your freelance work? Just download the FREE, 1-page checklist below! It will tell you EXACTLY how to decide when and IF to tell your boss about your freelance work.

But don’t be shy if you want to totally ditch that office gig and go rogue! Download the FREE Ultimate Guide to Transitioning Into Freelance, complete with the 4 phases of becoming a full-time freelancer with step-by-step tips for what to do at each phase.

Elana Lyn Gross is a content strategist, freelance writer, and the author of the career advice and lifestyle blog Elana Lyn. Her work has appeared in Time, Business Insider, and The Huffington Post. When she is not writing, she can be found taking long walks in Central Park.

9 Struggles Only Freelancers Understand

This post was originally published July 28, 2015 on Levo’s article page by Meredith Lepore.

struggling at workWith more than 53 million Americans doing freelance work as of 2015, they now make up 34 percent of the U.S. workforce, according to a 2014 survey by Edelman Berland. So, there’s a chance you too may find yourself considering this career path. After all, the freelance life sounds pretty great: no more cubicles, no boss looking over your shoulder, pants aren’t a requirement if you are working from your bed. But before you go and quit your day job, make yourself aware of these common freelancer struggles (take it from someone who’s lived this life for more than two years already!):

  1. Your parents think you’re out of your mind.

Our parents are from a different generation, and when you say “freelance,” you may as well say “I’m selling friendship bracelets in Union Square.” Try to be patient with them—and assure them that you have a plan (offer to lay it out for ’em) and know what you’re doing.

  1. Your friends assume you wear your pajamas all day.

You will inevitably get a G-chat message from a friend asking you if you are out of your bed and have even gotten dressed today. Now yes, there are some days when no one will see you from the waist down, but inevitably most freelancers do get dressed (and yes, yoga pants do count as getting dressed).

  1. …and that you live paycheck to paycheck.

For people who have always worked for one company, it is very hard to imagine that you could work as an independent contractor, much less make a living at it. However, in many industries you can actually make more money as a freelancer than if you were working for one company. Still, some of your friends will assume you are one week away from selling fruit at a gas station.

  1. You have to deal with clients who don’t pay on time.

You do need to know that—unlike working for a salary, where you get a paycheck once or twice a month like clockwork—you have to hustle for your money in the freelance world. Sometimes you will have to harass people to pay you on time, and there may be weeks where no one pays you and then weeks where everyone pays you at the same time. You just have to be as financially organized as possible.

  1. Your friends also assume you do yoga for three hours day, in the middle of the day.

If you are going freelance, do get ready for people to ask you if you workout in the middle of the day or go to movies or sit on a bench and feed birds. Yes, making your own schedule is a perk of freelancing, and you may be able to do some things during the day that people in an office can’t, but it is probably because you started working earlier, or plan to work later, or on weekends.

  1. Your taxes are scary.

Be prepared to get professional help with your taxes—because they are going to be a tad complex, and you should not do them yourself. (I repeat, you should not do them yourself.) What you can do? Keep track of your expenses (especially if you work from home). It’ll help you big-time come April.

  1. A coffee shop will become your second home. 

Expect people to ask which trendy coffee shop you work in, and that they will often imagine you sitting there in a striped tee, sipping on a cappuccino, staring out a window (for some reason you are French in this fantasy). Yes, freelancers do work in coffee shops often, but they are usually the ones with their heads down, working tirelessly, and not staring out the window. (PS: According to The Economist, freelancers work longer hours than full-time employees—it comes out to around 6 percent more hours per week.)

  1. It can be a little lonely.

Though there are days when you don’t think you can stand being in an office full of coworkers, believe it or not, you do start to miss having people around. This will result in you chatting up baristas, store clerks, and dogs on the street more than you ever thought you would.

  1. You are your own boss.

This can sound great because, well, you’re your own boss. On the other hand, YOU ARE YOUR OWN BOSS. You are responsible for adhering to deadlines, the final product, any tools and resources you need, finding health insurance, and, you know, your income! That is a lot of pressure!

As with any job, there are pros and cons of going freelance—but anything rewarding usually involves some kind of risk. Just stay focusedconnected, and buckle up for an exciting ride!