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Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Apply for the Same Job with Multiple Recruiters

Here's Why You Shouldn't Apply for the Same Job with Multiple Recruiters

Cherifta Daniel By Cherifta Daniel,
Recruitment Specialist at Eagle

In a world filled with worry and uncertainty during one of the biggest global challenges ever seen, unemployment rates have skyrocketed. Quarantine has inflamed and incited many emotions, one of which is candidate frustration with the job market. As a result, there has been an increase in the number of candidates applying for the same job with different recruiters. Is this okay? Absolutely not. The reasons why may surprise you.

In the wonderfully dynamic world of recruiting, this situation is called a “Double Submission.” It should be made clear that it is okay to work with multiple recruiters. In fact, this is encouraged as this can only increase your chances of finding a job because no one agency can cover all jobs in a local market. However, applying for the same job with different recruiters is no bueno.

It Doesn’t Increase Your Chances

There is a misconception that engaging with two recruiters to submit to the same job can improve your chances of getting an interview. This is not the case. Doubly submitting yourself for the same position is not like entering a raffle where the more tickets you buy (in this case resumes you submit), the greater your chances of winning the grand prize will be. This in fact has an adverse effect. Instead of getting you steps closer to your dream job, this is what can happen:

Blacklisted from the Hiring Company

Hiring companies use recruiters to gain access to top talent that they are unable to find on their own and to also streamline their recruitment processes. This is a way for them to also control the number of applications they receive — essentially serving as a direct prevention method for double submissions. By applying through different agencies, you are contradicting the purpose of this process and this can get you blacklisted from the hiring company. If you are blacklisted this means that you will automatically be disqualified from ever being considered for any future opportunities with this particular company. Additionally, you also run the risk of this company recommending other organizations in the same industry to not hire you. Your odds don’t seem too great anymore!

You Burn Your Bridges (Scorch Them)

When you work with a recruiter and you agree to have that person and company represent you for an opportunity, you seal this agreement typically in writing by email. This agreement is your word (your bond) that this recruiter (or recruitment company) is the only one allowed to represent you for this particular position — meaning you also cannot apply with any other agencies or directly to the hiring company. Going through multiple recruiters for the same position is a breach of ethics. You jeopardize the relationship that you have with your recruiter and create a lack of trust. Additionally, all of the hard work and efforts that went into your submission have now become futile.

Recruiter Wars

When you apply to the same position with multiple recruiters, no one wins — not even you. Additionally, this behavior can make the recruiting agencies that you are working with look as though they did not do their due diligence in securing your candidacy. In the end, this could create a situation where, if the client wants to interview you, you have a battle of agencies fighting over you because you gave them all the right to represent you for the same position. Companies do not like fighting over candidates, much less over who gets a finder’s fee. It is just too messy!

Time to take a beat. What’s the lesson here?

It is not okay to do and ask for forgiveness later. If you are unaware or unsure if you are applying to the same position with another recruiter, ask questions before you agree to be represented. Honestly communicate what your job search activity looks like. If you are also unsure about whether or not a recruiting company would 100% submit you for the opportunity, have an open conversation and work with a company that you can trust. Be subtle, yet impactful. Have a carefully crafted resume that mimics your personality, background, and skillset and submit this to only one recruiter. Be confident in your application and what you put out. Finally, be patient — it is a virtue!