Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: detail-oriented

If You Don’t Upload a Resume, Nobody’s Going to Call You

The title of this post seems like an obvious statement, but we’re shocked at the amount of candidates who apply for jobs without uploading a resume for recruiters to evaluate. Or, they do upload a resume but it lacks the detail required to determine if a candidate is qualified for a job.

Why You Must Submit a Quality Resume to Recruiters If You Want a Job

If You Don't Upload a Resume, Nobody's Going to Call YouThe days of having one copy of a brief, generic resume and submitting it to every company are long gone (assuming they were ever here). In the last 20 years, online job boards have changed the entire game of job searching and resume writing. Yet some people, aside from embracing online tools, are still playing the game like it’s the ’90s.

As job boards continue to focus on candidate experience and make the application process easy for you, keep in mind, they’re making it easier for every job seeker. When it’s easier, more people apply. When more people apply, recruiters are receiving more applications. When recruiters have more options, they ignore bad resumes, and they especially ignore the candidates who don’t submit one at all. Just because you wrote a compelling cover letter, a recruiter is not going to call you for more information. It all must be available to them right away. Anything less gives a perception of laziness, apathy, and just not caring.

This, of course, is assuming a recruiter even finds you. Automated applicant tracking solutions, complete with artificial intelligence, are increasingly more affordable and accessible to companies of all sizes. Even the smallest staffing agencies and employers are taking advantage of these screening tools, ensuring that busy recruiters and hiring managers only review resumes that a computer deemed valuable. When your resume does not include enough details and explanations about your experience, it will fail to pass a preliminary screening and sit in a database never to be seen again.

Furthermore, low-detailed resumes are often the reason you keep getting phone calls from recruiters for jobs that do not match your skillset. If you barely put in details explaining what you do, when your name does appear in a recruiter’s search, it will be for job opportunities irrelevant to your actual experience and job role.

A link to a public profile is also a great compliment to an uploaded resume, particularly when a resume is dated as it allows a recruiter to find more recent experience. However, as a stand-alone, the information detailed in the link will not be uploaded to a database and the chances of getting found for a particular position are significantly decreased.

We Understand, Badly Uploaded Resumes Are Not Always Your Fault

Yes, there are a few lazy IT professionals out there who are submitting useless resumes, and most independent contractors do put hours of work into their resume. So why do recruiters still complain about too many bad resumes being submitted?

In some circumstances, an applicant wants to apply to a job when it is posted, but because they’re on a phone, tablet or the wrong computer, the right resume was not available. In other cases, an error occurred that you were not aware of. Some resume formats are not readable by automated resume screeners and other times, though much less frequently, technology does what it does best and a glitch prevents your resume from being submitted properly.

How Can You Guarantee Your Detailed Resume is Submitted and Reviewed by a Recruiter?

First, double-check to ensure it is actually as detailed as you need it to be. The old rule of keeping a resume under two-pages is less significant today. Computers can read hundreds of pages in seconds, so if you need to add a few to ensure your experience is clearly explained, go ahead and do it.

Next, keep your resume in a simple format. That means Microsoft Word (even PDFs can cause headaches) and skip out on the fancy fixings. Tables, text boxes, images and locking can all prevent an automated resume screener from interpreting your content.

Finally, be patient at the fact technology has its downfalls. Return to your online profile to double-check that your resume was uploaded how you want it to be. If a recruiter does contact you for a copy of your resume, accept that there may have been an error, and politely email them the version you uploaded, including any updates they request.

Your resume is your number one selling tool as an independent contractor, and that cannot be understated. Automated resume screeners, artificial intelligence and other technologies (including their errors) are reality and that cannot be ignored either. Embracing these facts are a crucial first step in successful job applications.

How to Prove that You Actually are “Detail-Oriented”

If you’re going to use a buzzword to describe yourself, at least make sure you can back it up with examples. One of the most common terms we see in resumes and social media, or hear in interviews, is “detail-oriented”.  What does that even mean? If everybody’s claiming to be “detail-oriented” is it really a differentiator?

Perhaps you actually are somebody who pays attention to every little detail and is dedicated to perfection. If that’s the case, you need to be aware that others have hi-jacked your word. It’s no longer enough to tell a hiring manager or recruiter that you’re detail-oriented because they’re numb to it. You must back it up in everything you do.

Not sure what we mean? Check out this video. It goes through an IT contractor’s entire job search process and provides insight on where you can pay a more attention to detail, and back-up your use of an overused buzzword.

Job Hunting – The Devil is in the Details

Kelly Benson By Kelly Benson,
Branch Manager at Eagle

Job Hunting - The Devil is in the DetailsThey say that you never get a second chance to make a first impression and there is so much truth to that in the hiring process.  While there are a lot of different ways that a job seeker can differentiate themselves from the pack when applying for roles, one surprising differentiator is an attention to detail.

In the past 20 years, I have seen some great resumes, some terrible resumes and a lot that fall somewhere in between.  I once had a client compare receiving a resume to going on a first date and it was a comparison that I have never forgotten… one would never go on a first date without a little extra effort, so it stands to reason that we should do the same to impress a potential client or employer.

Here are a few quick tips to craft a great first impression through the application process:

  1. Avoid Senseless Mistakes– review your resume for typos, grammatical errors and inconsistent tense. When hiring managers receive a high number of applicants, often the first round of candidates to be eliminated are those that don’t make a great first impression because of grammar or spelling errors.
  2. Follow the Application Instructions– instructions in a posting are the first step in the evaluation process and small “traps” are often included to catch people who might “skim”.  If you are asked for a cover letter, produce one.  It will be used to evaluate both your written communication skills AND your ability to follow instructions.
  3. Customize Your Resume– focus on the role that you are interested in and match the relevant details in your resume to the job posting, but don’t duplicate the job posting.  The author of the job posting wants to see your experience and professionalism – they do not want to see their work plagiarized.
  4. Fact Check– make sure everything on your resume is accurate.  If you share any links (portfolio, websites, LinkedIn, etc), make sure they work as expected. Also, keep in mind that background, employment and education verifications are very common – in addition to traditional references.
  5. Google Yourself– you should expect that you will be searched at some point in the hiring process and often it is earlier than you think.  Do you need to clean up your social profile or adjust privacy settings?

Once your resume lands you the interview, here are some tips on how to knock the interview out of the park.

Conduct an In-Depth Job Search

Conduct an In-Depth Job SearchSometimes you have no problems finding your next IT project — the market is strong, past clients are following-up, recruiters are calling and contracts are getting extended. Other times, it can be a stressful struggle and seems like nobody out there, not even in other regions, is seeking a technology contractor with your valuable skillset.  If recruiters are calling you, they’re offering jobs that don’t really match what you do or for a rate that you’re hesitant to accept. The only option is to roll up your sleeves and search for jobs on your own.

There are many strategies and techniques to search for jobs. You can build your online presence to get access to more jobs, improve your networking skills to get an inside scoop, and of course, the traditional online job search. That online job search should not be underestimated. If you perform a search with enough depth, it’s amazing what kind of opportunities you may uncover that other IT contractors don’t know exist. Here’s a route you could take when conducting an in-depth, online job search.

  1. Start at Google
    Like most great searches, it’s perfectly alright to start your job search at the world’s most popular search engine. Many job seekers already do this, but what they frequently miss out on are all of the results. Instead, they click the first link they see that looks like it has potential, and never return. When you see a link that interests you, right-click on it to select the “Open in a New Tab” option. Do this as you go through many pages of your job search until results are no longer relevant to you.
  2. Follow-Through on Everything
    Now that you have a bunch of tabs open, view the job that you opened up, but don’t stop there. For each one, whether it’s a company’s unique career site or a larger job board, search all possible job opportunities. If there’s nothing for you but it could have potential, create a profile and sign up for job alerts if they’re available. (you may want to check out this post about managing your job search footprint)
  3. Repeat
    This is the step skipped most often. Once you’ve been through steps 1 and 2 in detail, start over at Google, but with different search criteria. Every query will bring you some duplicate results, but you’ll also see some unique pages. Try changing around keywords, think of other job titles employers may use, or add in more details such as specific skills, cities or industries.

Ensuring your job search process is in-depth may be time consuming, but doing it is the only way to make sure you’re finding the most possible opportunities when you need them. Starting at Google is a solid start and this will not change. Google recently launched “Google for Jobs” in the US, which uses Google’s search intelligence to find jobs with titles you didn’t even know existed, but fit your needs. It will allow you to conduct a detailed job search, but with less effort. Keep posted to the Talent Development Centre when Google for Jobs is available in Canada for a full review.