Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: computers

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to computers.

History’s Most Notable Computers Since the First Personal Computer

Since the first ever personal computer was released back in 1971, manufacturers have continued to release different versions with ranging capabilities. They’ve come in unique shapes and sizes and had some incredible price tags.Thomas Schanz [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)]

As an interesting exercise, 24/7 Wallstreet recently took a look at each year’s most notable computer release since 1971. These computers held an important place in computing history, either because they were the best-selling model or had a significant technological development. You can visit the full article for a detailed trip down memory lane, complete with pictures and descriptions. For the summarized version, here’s the entire list:

1971

  • Notable computer: Kenbak I
  • Price tag: $750
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,659

1972

  • Notable computer: HP 3000
  • Price tag: $95,000
  • Inflation adjusted price: $571,791

1973

  • Notable computer: Wang 2200
  • Price tag: $3,500
  • Inflation adjusted price: $19,832

1974

  • Notable computer: Scelbi-8H
  • Price tag: $440
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,245

1975

  • Notable computer: IBM 5100 Portable Computer
  • Price tag: $8,975
  • Inflation adjusted price: $41,970

1976

  • Notable computer: Apple I
  • Price tag: $667
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,949

1977

  • Notable computer: Apple II
  • Price tag: $1,298
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,389

1978

  • Notable computer: IBM 5110
  • Price tag: $9,875
  • Inflation adjusted price: $38,105

1979

  • Notable computer: Heathkit H-89
  • Price tag: $1,595
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,527

1980

  • Notable computer: Commodore VIC-20
  • Price tag: $299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $913

1981

  • Notable computer: IBM Personal Computer 5150
  • Price tag: $1,565
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,332

1982

  • Notable computer: Commodore 64
  • Price tag: $595
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,551

1983

  • Notable computer: Apple Lisa
  • Price tag: $9,995
  • Inflation adjusted price: $25,247

1984

  • Notable computer: Apple Macintosh
  • Price tag: $2,495
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,042

1985

  • Notable computer: Commodore Amiga 1000
  • Price tag: $1,295
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,028

1986

  • Notable computer: Compaq Portable II
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $8,032

1987

  • Notable computer: Commodore Amiga 500
  • Price tag: $700
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,550

1988

  • Notable computer: NeXT Cube
  • Price tag: $6,500
  • Inflation adjusted price: $13,824

1989

  • Notable computer: Macintosh Portable M5120
  • Price tag: $7,300
  • Inflation adjusted price: $14,811

1990

  • Notable computer: Poqet PC
  • Price tag: $1,995
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,840

1991

  • Notable computer: Apple Macintosh PowerBook
  • Price tag: $2,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,247

1992

  • Notable computer: IBM ThinkPad
  • Price tag: $2,375
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,259

1993

  • Notable computer: Apple Newton MessagePad
  • Price tag: $700
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,219

1995

  • Notable computer: Gateway Solo 2000
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,776

1996

  • Notable computer: Gateway Solo 2100
  • Price tag: $4,149
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,653

1997

  • Notable computer: Dell Dimension XPS H266
  • Price tag: $3,979
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,237

1998

  • Notable computer: iMac
  • Price tag: $1,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,005

1999

  • Notable computer: Compaq ProSignia Desktop 330
  • Price tag: $2,699
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,076

2000

  • Notable computer: Gateway Performance 1500
  • Price tag: $3,089
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,513

2001

  • Notable computer: Apple Titanium PowerBook G4
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,049

2002

  • Notable computer: Toshiba Satellite 1955
  • Price tag: $2,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,495

2003

  • Notable computer: Apple Power Mac G5
  • Price tag: $1,999
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,733

2004

  • Notable computer: Sony VAIO PCV-V200G
  • Price tag: $1,699
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,263

2005

  • Notable computer: Lenovo ThinkPad X41
  • Price tag: $2,249
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,897

2006

  • Notable computer: Dell XPS M1710
  • Price tag: $2,845
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,550

2007

  • Notable computer: iPhone 1
  • Price tag: $599
  • Inflation adjusted price: $727

2008

  • Notable computer: MacBook Air
  • Price tag: $1,599
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,868

2009

  • Notable computer: HP 2140 Mini-Note
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $585

2010

  • Notable computer: iPad
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $576

2011

  • Notable computer: Acer Chromebook
  • Price tag: $349
  • Inflation adjusted price: $390

2012

  • Notable computer: Apple iPad (third generation)
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $547

 

2013

  • Notable computer: Toshiba Satellite C55D
  • Price tag: $330
  • Inflation adjusted price: $356

2014

  • Notable computer: Lenovo ThinkPad X240
  • Price tag: $1,555
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,653

2015

  • Notable computer: MacBook
  • Price tag: $1,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,379

2016

  • Notable computer: Lenovo Yoga 900S
  • Price tag: $1,099
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,152

2017

  • Notable computer: Google Pixelbook
  • Price tag: $999
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,041

2018

  • Notable computer: Huawei MateBook X Pro
  • Price tag: $1,200
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,221

How to Manage Your Time More Effectively (according to machines)

We can all get better at managing time in one way or another. The more efficient we are, the more we’re able to get done, including projects for clients, job searching, invoicing and, or course spending personal time with friends and family.

As an IT professional, you’re well aware of the efficiencies of computers and likely already have some knowledge in how they’re programmed to behave so efficiently. Have you ever taken a step back to see if you can apply a machine’s prioritization and time management strategies to your own personal life? That’s exactly what this video from TED-Ed covers and the concepts that result are very interesting.

Top 10 Worst Computers Ever (Video)

Every industry has them — new products that were expected to be the “next big thing” but turned into an epic fail. Sometimes it’s a company trying to diversify their current product (New Coke), other times it’s a company trying to get into an industry where they don’t belong (Did you know Bic tried to make underwear, Harley Davidson tried making perfume and Cheetos took a shot at the lip balm market?), and other times, it’s just another failure of an innovative company who tries everything (Google Glass, Google Plus, etc.).

Among the many product flops of all time, the computer market has not been immune. For proof, just have a look at this video from Top Media. It goes through, what they believe, are the top 10 worst computers ever. You’ll be shocked at the types of technology some companies tried to sell.

Don’t Dump It – Donate It!

Frances McCart By Frances McCart,
Vice-President, Business Development at Eagle

I have been working in the technology industry for over 2 decades and have had the pleasure of working for companies who regularly refresh the technology they use internally.  For people who are surrounded by technology, you tend to take for granted the access you have to technology, both at work and in your home life.  One also makes the assumption that living in Canada, everyone has access to some sort of computer at school, at home or at work.  This assumption was quashed recently for me.

Don't Dump It - Donate It! Eagle recently went through a technology refresh and we had a number of gently used computers and peripherals up for grabs.  We asked around our office if anyone was interested, and some were taken but a number were left unclaimed. The computers were earmarked for the “technology dump/reseller” market when I made a last ditch effort to find homes for them.  I called around to a number of schools in Toronto to see if any of them could use extra computers.  Much to my surprise, I had immediate takers for the 4 computers we had.   I spoke with a very excited school Principal who said she had a great home for the computers: 2 for her school library and 2 for families who did not have access to a computer at home.

I had the great pleasure of dropping off the computers at the school and was greeted by some of the future users.  They were all excited to see they would have 2 more computers in their library and that 2 of their friends would now have computers at home.

Several organizations have computer refresh programs and many corporations do not donate their used computers, but send them off to companies who strip them down. By simply formatting the hard drive, you can ensure safety of your data and these computers can be donated to organizations or schools in need.

I’m pleased that we were able to find such a good home for these computers, and encourage others to explore these options before having their computers end up in a landfill.