Talent Development Centre

Tag Archives: coding

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to coding.

How to Teach Yourself Code (Infographic)

Knowing a programming language is a great addition to anyone’s skillset, whether you’re in IT or not. Being fluent in multiple languages would make somebody even more valuable. If you want an advantage in your job search, you may be considering learning a new coding language but are unsure where to start. In which case, review this infographic from Lime and see if there’s anything there that can help you. The pricing and info is UK-based, but in most cases, these resources offer Canadian packages as well.

How to Teach Yourself Code (Infographic)

Fun Ways Kids Can Learn to Code (Infographic)

In David O’Brien’s article last December, Coding is the New Cursive, he explained the importance of coding for the up-and-coming generation and how many young children are already learning the basics of the important skill in school. If you’re an IT contractor, then you probably also buy into this train-of-thought and want to ensure your children are picking up some of this basic knowledge in school.

In case your school isn’t offering it, or you’d like to help move it along, this infographic from WhoIsHostingThis? is an awesome resource. It suggests helpful ideas, games, and apps that making learning to code fun for kids.

Fun Ways Kids Can Learn to Code - Via Who Is Hosting This: The Blog

Source: WhoIsHostingThis.com

Learning to Code: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet

Nobody knows your skillset better than you do. Only you truly understand your proficiency with specific codes, your capabilities, and your interests for future learning. There are so many options for coding out there, though, that when it comes to prioritizing which skills to learn or improve, you may be struggling.

If this sounds familiar, then have a look at this extremely in-depth infographic created by make a websitehub.com. It reveals the capabilities, pros, cons, and job potential for all of the major codes, including Python, Java, C, C++, JavaScript, C#, Ruby, PHP, and Obj [C].

Learning

Infographic Courtesy of Makeawebsitehub.com

The Try Guys Try Coding With Girls Who Code (Video)

Have you heard of The Try Guys? They’re BuzzFeed‘s group of guys who try just about anything new and document it in what often turns out to be embarrassing videos for the world to see. After completing challenges that included trying Irish Step Dance, UFC fighting and even nude modelling, they decided to spend a day with Girls Who Code, an organization that works to inspire, educate, and equip girls with the computing skills to pursue 21st century opportunities. Take a look and enjoy as the Try Guys learn that coding isn’t as easy as they may think!

Google’s Most Popular Software Technologies

Diversification is a common technique used to reduce risk in many situations — investment portfolios, client lists, services offered — but how diverse is your skill set? Great Software Developers already know that having a variety of tools under their belt makes it easier to land the highest paying contracts. If you’re considering learning something new or brushing up on your skills, have a look at this article by Nick Kolakowski that was recently published by Dice. He reviews the top technologies as listed by Google in 2015.

While terming a particular technology “most popular” is always a problematic endeavor, Google’s gargantuan amount of search data offers some excellent insights into which technologies seized the world’s attention in 2015.

Google’s list of the most-searched software technologies last year included, in descending order:

  1. Java
  2. HTML
  3. Python
  4. JavaScript
  5. SQL
  6. CSS
  7. Adobe Flash
  8. R
  9. C
  10. GO

These rankings should be unsurprising to tech pros and Web developers; the top five technologies, for example, undergird the modern Web.

Further down the list, however, is where things get a little more interesting: Windows PowerShell (a task-automation and configuration management network), Scratch (a visual programming language), and Go (a programming language developed at Google) all made first-time appearances on the list in 2015. Adobe Flash was also new to the list, despite its age; perhaps the increased search volume was due to controversies over the platform’s security, or Adobe’s announcement that it would soon commence HTML5 support for Flash Professional CC.

For Web developers (and pretty much anyone whose job intersects in some way with the Web and mobile), knowledge of Java, HTML, and JavaScript is a given. But giving Go, Scratch, and PowerShell another look in 2016 might be a good idea; if those technologies catch on, they could climb further up the list—at which point, knowing them will be absolutely essential.