Talent Development Centre

How to Talk Money with Recruiters

Sam Rahbar By Sam Rahbar,
National Training Manager at Eagle

No one likes to discuss salary or rate, it can be an awkward conversation. But as an IT consultant this is a topic that comes up all the time when discussing contract opportunities with recruiters. Rate conversations can often turn into a long drawn out back and forth between the recruiters and consultants. Here are five tips on how to work with a recruiter to avoid the unnecessary lengthy conversations and land the best rate possible:

  1. Customize your resume. Before applying to the role, make sure to include all your relevant experience related to the provided job description, including the nice to haves. Don’t leave any room for assumptions. Competition is fierce and a customized resume is the first step towards getting a more competitive rate.
  1. Remember, you are on the same team! A recruiter’s primary role is to present the best available candidate with the most competitive rate. Work with your recruiter to find out the top end of the rate and the sweet spot where the client likes to hire at. With VMS companies dictating level playing grounds for all recruiting agencies, these days all recruiters work within the same rate brackets and cannot go above or below a certain percentage. This means all recruiters will compete for the best candidate with the most competitive rate.
  1. Ask about market rate. When it comes to current market rates, recruiters have VIP access! There is no one better to educate you on who is hiring at what rate. This is crucial information when it comes to landing your next gig. Ask your recruiter for current market rates, so you are able to position yourself accordingly.
  1. Be flexible. I hear so many times about great candidates that lost out on opportunities due to not being flexible on a couple of dollars an hour. Clients want the job done with the best quality and most reasonable price. Sometimes that 2-3 dollars an hour can put you in a competitive advantage. And when you calculate 2 dollars an hour over a course of a 6 month contract, after taxes, it does not amount to much. It’s definitely not enough to lose out on a chance to work on a project with a reputable brand.
  1. A new project means a new budget. Different clients will have different budgets based on their industry, type of project and market rates. It is normal to have your hourly rate fluctuate 10 dollars, up or down, depending on the end client and type of project. So try not to use your most recent rate as a hard bottom-line for your next contract because that will potentially limit your options.
  1. Consider the BIG picture. When discussing a new opportunity with a recruiter, make sure to consider all angles: length of the contract, possibility of extension, getting exposed to new technology, or a new type of project under your belt. Think about what the positive effects could do for your marketability long term. There are other factors to consider like your hours, commute, company culture, and perks to name a few.

 

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