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IT Industry News for December 2017


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on January 5th, 2018

This is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for December 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Novembers

Five years ago, in December 2012 there was a fair amount of M&A activity with Oracle making two acquisitions, marketing automation company Eloqua ($871 million) and Dataraker which provides analytics for utilities companies.  The big deal of the month saw Sprint pay $2.2 Billion to take full control of cellular competitor Clearwire.   Montreal based Cogeco paid $635 million for Peer 1 Networks and NCR paid $635 million for retail software and services company Retalix.  In the BYOD space Citrix bought mobile device management company Zenprise for $355 million.  Finally, Redknee added 1200 employees and 130 new clients through the purchase of Nokia Siemens’ Business Support Network. December 2013 was a slow month, however Oracle pulled off a $1.5 billion buy of marketing software company Responsys; Akamai paid $370 million for cloud-based security solutions provider Prolexic; JDS Uniphase paid $200 million for enterprise performance management company Network Instruments; IBM bought a “big data” file compression company Aspera and Hitachi expended its solutions capability with the purchase of Calgary based Ideaca.  In other company news Target, although not an IT company, had a major security breach involving details of 40 million debit and credit cards.  Three years ago December 2014 was not such a slow news month, with the political and technical ramifications of “the Sony hack” causing uproar, some very positive economic indicators out of the US and some big names making acquisitions, albeit not huge deals.  Microsoft made two acquisitions, the $200 million purchase of mobile email app startup Acompli and mobile development company HockeyApp (which has nothing to do with hockey).  SAP bought travel and expense management company Concur; Intel bought a Montreal based identity management company PasswordBox; Oracle bought digital marketing company Datalogix; Teradata bought data archiving company Rainstor; and MongoDB bought high-scale storage engine company WiredTiger. December 2015 was not a busy M&A month but there was some interesting activity.  The big deal saw Canadian telco Shaw make a big play into the cellular space with its proposed acquisition of Wind for $1.6 billion.  Meanwhile Rogers was also out shopping and growing its Maritimes presence through the acquisition of Internetworking Atlantic Inc.  Other deals in December were not large but did feature some of the big players.  Oracle bought Stackhouse a cloud company with a specialization in “containers”; IBM boosted its video in the cloud capabilities with the purchase of Clearleap; and Microsoft picked up a mobile communications company, Talko.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro buy the Odin Service Automation business from Parallels and in the storage world Carbonite bought Evault from Seagate.  Last year in December 2016 Adecco sold its majority stake in Beeline VMS to GTRC, a private equity firm, for $100 million in cash plus a $30 million note; CRN solution provider SS&C purchased asset service firm Conifer for $88.5 million; solution provider QRX Technology Group acquired IT equipment provider Kerr Norton; networking solution provider, Juniper Networks acquired cloud operations management provider AppFormix; Uber bought start-up Geometric Intelligence Inc.; and Shopify acquired Tiny Hearts, a Toronto-based mobile product development studio.  Yahoo hit the news revealing that one billion accounts were hacked in 2013 making it the largest data breach recorded in history.

Which brings us back to the present …

 December 2017 saw Atos enhance the footprint of their IT Services firm by paying $5 billion for Gemalto.  Apple were busy, paying $400 million for music recognition app Shazam plus they invested $390 million into optical communications components company Finisar.  Finally, in a relatively quiet M&A month Ingram Micro increased its data protection capability through the purchase of Cloud Harmonics.

The Canadian economy had some positive indicators, adding jobs and reducing the unemployment rate to 5.9%.  The US also continued its growth rate, albeit at a slightly reduced pace although the announced tax changes for business are going to provide a significant stimulus.  Generally reports from around the globe were fairly positive, with job growth and reduced unemployment in most countries.

There was a cautionary report about ransomware in Canada that might suggest up to 44% of SMBs were hit with ransomware in a 12 month period.

That’s what I saw affecting the tech industry for December 2017.

Until next month Walk Fast and Smile!

A Few Tech Trends for 2018


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A Few Tech Trends for 2018

As another year comes to a close, people are providing their insights and predictions to what will happen in 2018. You may have already noticed some of those articles. If not, let this be the first one you see this year!

AI Trends for 2018

Artificial Intelligence was possibly the biggest buzz word of 2017. According this Inc. article, the hype will die down, but we can also expect to see these top 5 AI trends in 2018:

  1. Natural language will replace specific commands
  2. Emotion recognition will deeply enhance the bot/human relationship
  3. AI will bring big data analytics to the masses
  4. The debate on ethics will only get more heated
  5. The hype will start to die down

Cybersecurity in 2018

Another hot topic throughout 2017 was cybersecurity and Inc. also put out an article with an outlook on that topic. Here’s a summary of what they think, based on a conversation with Steve Morgan, Founder and Editor in Chief at Cybersecurity Ventures:

  • Cybercrime will cost the world $6-trillion annually by 2021, up from about half of that figure in 2015.
  • Global spending on cybersecurity products and services will exceed $1 trillion from this year through 2021.
  • There will be 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs globally by 2021, up from 1 million positions in 2014.
  • The cybersecurity unemployment rate dropped to effectively zero percent in 2016, and is expected to remain at effectively zero through at least 2021.
  • There are 111 billion new lines of software code that need to be secured in 2017, and that figure will grow dramatically every year over the next five years.
  • Global spending on cybersecurity products and services by healthcare-related firms (which are currently the firms facing the most cyberattacks) will reach $65 billion cumulatively from 2017 through 2021.
  • Global ransomware damages will exceed $5 billion in 2017 – up 15X in just 2 years – and ransomware attacks on hospitals will quadruple by 2020.
  • The number of cybersecurity engineers and analysts in the Washington D.C. beltway area is 350% more than the rest of the United States combined.
  • Spending to train employees on security awareness will exceed $10 billion annually by 2027, up from $1 billion in 2014.
  • Wi-Fi and mobile devices will account for nearly 80 percent of IP traffic by 2025. Bring-Your-Own-Device and mobile apps will pose a major security threat to the enterprise over the next eight years.
  • People around the globe will need to secure 300 billion passwords by 2020.
  • High throughput DDoS attacks, as well as IoT botnet attacks, will force many organizations to move their IT infrastructures to the cloud by 2020.
  • Newly reported zero-day exploits will rise to one-per-day by 2021, up from one-per-week in 2015.

Gartner’s Predictions for 2018 and Beyond

Finally, in early October, Gartner release their top strategic predications for 2018 and beyond:

  1. By 2021, early adopter brands that redesign their websites to support visual and voice search will increase digital commerce revenue by 30%.
  2. By 2020, 5 of top 7 digital giants will willfully self-disrupt to create their next leadership opportunity.
  3. By the year 2020, the banking industry will derive $1B of business value from the use of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies.
  4. By 2022, the majority of individuals in mature economies will consume more false information than true information.
  5. By 2020, AI-driven creation of “counterfeit reality,” or fake content, will outpace AI’s ability to detect it, fomenting digital distrust.
  6. By 2021, more than 50% of enterprises will spend more per annum on bots and chatbot creation than traditional mobile app development.
  7. By 2021, 40% of IT staff will be “versatilists” holding multiple roles, most of which will be business- rather than technology-related.
  8. In 2020, AI will become a positive net job motivator, creating 2.3M jobs while only eliminating 1.8M jobs.
  9. By 2020, IoT technology will be in 95% of electronics for new product designs.
  10. Through 2022, half of all security budgets for IoT will go to fault remediation, recalls and safety failures rather than protection.

What predictions do you have for the future of technology?

Contractor Quick Poll: How do you feel about 2018?


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Eagle regularly shares our outlook of the job market and technology industry, explaining the trends that we see in the market. Of course, what we see isn’t always the same as what independent contractors across Canada see.

As the year comes to a close, we what to know how you’re feeling about 2018 in your field. Will it be easier or harder to find a job? Feel free to share your insights in the comments below.

IT Industry News for November 2017


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on December 5th, 2017

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for November 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Novembers

Five years ago in November 2012 Cisco made two significant “buys”, cloud infrastructure company Meraki ($1.2B) and cloud datacentre and software company Cloupia ($125M); Dell bought software tools company Gale Technologies; NCR bought retail software company Retalix ($650M); Cray bought software company Appro ($25M); Sprint Nextel bought a chunk of US Cellular ($480M); and Toronto based NexJ (headed by another ex-Andersen Consulting alumni) bought Broadstreet for $8.2 million.   In November 2013 Opentext paid $1.1 Billion for cloud based integration services company GXS Group and another Canadian deal saw Mitel buy Aastra for close to $400 million.  Other deals included ebay’s $800 million purchase of global payments company Braintree; Apple’s $370 million purchase of 3D sensor company PrimeSense; and Akamai’s purchase of Velocius Networks. Three years ago November 2014 was an exceptionally quiet month on the M&A front with the largest deal being the merger of two semiconductor companies, Cypress Semiconductor and Spansion to form a $4 billion company; private equity company Carlyle Group paid $700 million for investment bank technology company Dealogic and Yahoo shelled out $640 million for video advertising company BrightRoll.  November 2015 saw expedia pay $3.9 billion for HomeAway as a vehicle to better compete with Airbnb.  Zayo Holding Group became the first foreign company to own a Canadian telco after paying $465 million for Allstream.  Other, smaller deals saw Apple buy Faceshift, a motion capture company whose technology was used in a Star Wars movie; and Lightspeed POS bought SEOshop, increasing its size as a competitor to Shopify.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro grow its Brazilian presence with the purchase of ACAO; PCM bought Edmonton based services firm Acrodex; Data centre company CentriLogic bought infrastructure company Advanced Knowledge Networks; solution provider Scalar Systems bought another Toronto company, professional services firm Eosensa; and Washington based New Signature bought Toronto based Microsoft Partner, Imason.  Last year November 2016 saw Broadcom acquire Brocade Communication Systems for $5.9 billion; Adobe purchased multi-channel programmatic video platform TubeMogul for $540 million; IT services and outsourcing provider Wipro Limited bought IT cloud consulting firm Appirio for $500 million; Oracle Corp. announced its plans to acquire DNS solution provider, Dyn Inc.; SoftwareOne acquired and integrated House of Lync; and Avnet completed an acquisition of Hackster.

Which brings us back to the present …

November 2017 saw some interesting information from countries round the world.  China’s growth slowed a little, India is struggling in the IT jobs space and there are some negative some effects from the upcoming Brexit that are affecting the UK and EU.  The US is looking strong again following a hurricane affected dip and Canada added 35,000 jobs in October.

The Big M&A activity for the month sees investment firm Thoma Bravo pay $1.6 billion for Barracuda networks.  McAfee also made an acquisition of Skyhigh Networks now that they are no longer a part of the Intel group of companies.  Smaller deals saw Talend buy Restlet and Qualys buy Netwatcher.

Other companies in the news include Lenovo, a struggling hardware company in a declining PC market and laying off 2% of their workforce.  The other company of interest was Uber who revealed a massive security breach which they had neglected to mention when it happened a year ago!

That’s what I saw affecting the tech industry for November 2017.  Until next month Walk Fast and Smile!

How “The Cloud” Has Developed Over 10 Years


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According to Google Trends, “Cloud Computing” began picking up popularity in early 2008. As people became curious, more were searching the term and the curiousity peaked around mid-2011. Since then, as the Cloud became a standard part of technology, search trends also began to even out but have hardly disappeared.

There are a number of reasons that we may have seen these trends over the years, and they all relate to how the technology has progressed. This infographic from Sonian Is a very nice summary of the complete history so far. It takes you through the Big Cloud Moments, Changing Cloud Perceptions, Cloud Growth and Adoption, Terminology and its Pioneers.

How “The Cloud” Has Developed Over 10 Years

Calgary IT Job Market Update at the end of November 2017


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By Morley Surcon (Vice President Western Canada at Eagle) and Brianne Risley (Delivery Manager at Eagle)

The following is a short summary of the IT Labour and Job Market in Calgary – supply, demand, and dynamics.

There are 3 “Trends” That Eagle has Noticed Over the Past Months:

Calgary IT Job Market UpdateCalgary has Developed an IT Skillset Gap: Information Technology changes and evolves very, very quickly. This means that what is “leading edge” today, may be “old news” in a matter of months. Over the past 18 months, Calgary companies have had a focus on sustainment. As a result, contractors have not had the opportunity to work on the technologies that are pushing the industry forward and a noticeable gap has developed between the skills available in the local Calgary IT community and the types of technology that are now starting to be requested by some organizations. Eagle is finding that in areas such as Dashboarding, SaaS, Front-end Development and Cloud development, it is difficult to find local people with the experience/knowledge in newly-in-demand technology. For example, we are now seeing demand for people with CSS/Javascript vs. the C# .NET that used to be so prevalent in the Calgary market. The same is true in the SAP space, where our customers are now looking for people with Fiori or HANA experience. We are seeing that companies are reaching out to out-of-town resources to fill these ‘niche’ skills and, in some cases, are paying elevated rates to do so. Companies may also be bringing in outsourcing companies and/or specialty partners to implement new-technology focused projects, going the way of out-sourcing or out-tasking to supply niche resources rather than running the projects in-house themselves.

Move Toward Greater Simplification:  Companies have been working towards consolidation and standardization over the past months. This encompasses both the technology that they use as well as the business partners with which they choose to work. Organizations in Calgary have shed roles over the past year(s) and must, therefore, focus on their core business/industry. It is increasingly difficult to find “the cycles” to complete projects that they do not have the in-house skills to complete. We are seeing much less custom development work in favor of their chosen ERP’s solution and/or implementing off-the-shelf software packages with little customization. And, instead of building up their own teams, more organizations have been opting to outsource or out-task project work to 3rd parties. Additionally, many of the companies in Calgary have undergone a vendor rationalization, reducing the number of suppliers/outsourcers that they deal with on a daily basis. This represents a clear shift in the quantity and types of roles for which staffing agencies are being hired and a greater degree of simplification for the companies themselves.

M&A Project Work: In Calgary, the majority of any new project work across many sectors is attributable to mergers and acquisitions. The necessity of integrating IT departments, reporting capabilities and business processes standardization work has created a short-term ‘bump’ in contract work. Many of the projects are due to be completed early in the New Year (or before). Once finished, these companies will be shedding staff once again to remove redundancies due to overlap in roles between the two companies and freeing up the staff that were solely employed for the integration project work itself.

The Following Market “Conditions” Have Also Been Noted:

Rates: Rates for non-specialized roles have remained flat for the past 6+ months. The exception is for ERP as demand has increased, albeit often for specialized skillsets as described above. Company “rate roll-backs” have halted as the employee and contractor rationalizations have been completed.

Skills with High and Growing Demand:  Eagle has noticed increased interest for contractors with the following skillsets:

  • Front-End Developers
  • Java Developers/Software Engineers/DevOps
  • Cyber Security Consultants
  • Project Managers (Agile, ERP, some Infrastructure)
  • ERP (Fiori/UI5) enhancement/upgrade work
  • IT Reporting – Cloud tools for data visualization – Tableau, Spotfire, Hana and related data warehousing/BI work. Predictive analytics and driving business value from data stores.

Skills with Neutral Demand:

  • Network/Storage Administrators
  • SaaS implementations (Sales Force, Service Now, Workday) + Traditional ERP (SAP/PS/Oracle)

Skills for Which We Have Seen a Decline in Demand:

  • .NET Developers (this is the first time in 10+ years that demand for Java/Front-end skills have outstripped .NET in Calgary)
  • Server Analysts/Administrators (Outsourcing companies are handling much of this demand by leveraging overseas options)

Existing open roles for Calgary can be viewed on here Eagle’s Job Board.

**Disclaimer: The market summary above reflects Eagle’s own experience. Please understand that this does not include interaction with 100% of the market. Eagle’s clientele tend toward the larger enterprise companies, therefore experience in Calgary’s SMB market may be substantially different.

If your experience or observations have been different, I encourage you to leave a comment so all may learn from your perspective as well!

Quick Poll Results: How often do you restart your cell phone?


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We’re quite confident that almost everybody reading this blog uses a cell phone (you may even be reading this from your smartphone right now). What we have no idea about is how each individual IT professional uses and maintains their phone… at least not until today, when we can finally get a very small piece of insight into the topic.

Last month’s contractor quick poll asked our readers how often they take the time the restart their phone, as recommended by many cell phone experts. The results are below and there is no single time period that stands out.

How Often Do You Restart Your Cell Phone?

Quick Poll Results: How often do you restart your cell phone?

Is DNA the Future of Data Storage?


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Move over floppy disk, there’s a new storage device in town! Ok, there have already been a few innovations since our old “save icon” became obsolete, but one has to sit back and be impressed by the progress we’ve made in storage. From massive machines that used an entire room to tiny chips, it’s almost unthinkable how much data we can put into one place. According to this video from TED-Ed, we still haven’t seen the best of it — apparently DNA is the future of storage!

The video explains how scientists have developed a way to send secret messages via DNA. The technology has since been advanced to store massive amounts of data on a microscopic piece that can last hundreds of thousands of years. Sound too good be true? Check out the video…

IT Industry News for October 2017


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Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee,
Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on The Eagle Blog on November 14th, 2017

A Little History of previous year’s Octobers

Tech NewsFive years ago in October 2012, news was dominated by Hurricane Sandy and the US presidential election.  The big deal of the month was a $1.5 billion merger of two US cell carriers, T-Mobile and MetroPCS. There were also a number of smaller deals, with EMC beefing up in the security area (Silver Tail), Telus expanding its medical solutions portfolio (Kinlogix Medical) and Avnet improving its IBM capabilities (BrightStar and BSP). In the social networking world, Yelp bought its European competitor Qype in a $50 million deal. In October 2013, Oracle announced two acquisitions, both cloud based companies: Big Machines and Compendium. Other “names” out shopping included Avaya buying the software division of ITNavigator for its call centre and social media monitoring software; Rackspace bought ZeroVM, a tech company with a software solution for the cloud; Intuit bought consulting company Level Up Analytics, primarily to acquire its talent; VMWare bought “desktop as a service” company Desktone; Netsuite bought human capital software company TribeHR; and Telus enhanced its mobile offering with the purchase of Public Mobile. Three years ago, in October 2014 we saw a new trend with two public companies both choosing to split into smaller entities. HP announced it was creating a business service focused Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and personal computing & printer company HP Inc. Symantec also chose to split into two independent public companies, one focused on business and consumer security products, the other on its information management portfolio. Other interesting news saw IBM pay $1.5 billion to GlobalFoundries so it would take away its money-losing semiconductor manufacturing business. NEST bought competitor Revolv; EMC bought three cloud companies — The Cloudscaling Group, Maginatics and Spanning Cloud Apps — and in Korea, Kakao and Daum merged to form a $2.9 billion internet entity. October 2015 brought some big deals with the biggest seeing Dell offer $26 billion to buy storage company EMC. Interestingly an EMC subsidiary, VMWare was also out shopping, picking up a small email startup, Boxer. In another deal involving “big bucks”, Western Digital paid $19 billion for storage competitor Sandisk. IBM were also writing a big cheque, paying $2 billion in a big data/internet of things play for The Weather Network (minus the TV operations), and IBM also picked up a storage company, Cleversafe. Cisco paid $522.5 million for cybersecurity firm Lancope; LogMeIn paid $110 million for LastPass; Trend Micro paid $350 million for next generation intrusion prevention systems company HP Tippingpoint; Red Hat picked up deployment task execution and automation company Ansible; Vasco Data Security paid $85 million for solution provider Silanis; and Apple bought a speech processing startup, VocalIQ. As industries converged, it was interesting to see Securitas pay $350 million for Diebold’s US Electronic Security business. October 2016 saw Qualcomm pay $47 billion for NXP Semiconductor. The only other sizable deal saw Wipro pay $500 million for IT cloud consulting company Appirio. Google picked up Toronto-based video marketing startup FameBit and Pivot Technology Solutions picked up Ottawa-based Teramach.

Which brings us back to the present

October 2017 continues a recent trend of reduced big ticket M&A activity, although there was certainly some action. Not yet a done deal, but Broadcom is chasing Qualcomm pretty hard and if it goes through it will be the biggest tech deal yet.  The latest rejected offer was north of $100 billion (some reports said $130 billion), but watch that space. In the meantime, Cisco is shelling out $1.9 billion for Broadsoft which improves Cisco’s software capabilities. The final significant deal saw Telus beef up its service provider capability with a $250 million purchase of Xavient.

The other company in the news was Amazon (a) because of its much publicized search for a site for its second headquarters which has 239 cities around the world excited at their prospects; (b) because they also announced a second presence in Vancouver, bringing another 1,000 jobs and (c) for its growing influence in the AI world, announcing a research center in Germany.

The economy continues to have many positive signs, although Hurricane’s Harvey, Irma and to a lesser extent Maria caused some temporary negative impact to employment numbers in the US. The general consensus seems to be that things will pick up again now, with some sectors even benefiting from the clean-up work. Canada’s numbers were again good with Canada adding more than 300,000 jobs in the last year.

The Workplace of the Future? The Answer is Probably Somewhere in the Middle


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Cameron McCallum By Cameron McCallum,
Regional Vice President at Eagle

There are a number of generally accepted theories as to what the workplace will look like in the near future. With the advent of new and more powerful technology, change is inevitable. And while it is fun to imagine a world of AI, advanced robotics and other marvels of the future which will make our lives so much better, the truth probably lies closer to the middle in that for every potential win for humanity, there is likely an offsetting loss and which side you are on might be as simple as the circumstance and geography to which you were born. Here are some of the most common predictions with a cold, hard look at what it might really mean.

  1. The Rise of the Freelancer

Much has been made of the fact that today more than at any other time, the use of freelancers is expanding. In the information technology field, independent contractors are seen as an essential part of the labour mix. They bring specific experience not available among client’s employees or they help to shore up a project that requires a temporary increase in manpower. But ideas like the “Taskification” of work whereby companies tap into a global pool of freelancers who perform work or “tasks” for a fee is also seen as a growing trend. Taskification allows for employers to tap into a global pool of workers but with no obligations to those individuals. Simply hiring the lowest-priced labor with no concern for their well-being or the conditions under which they deliver their labor is potentially no different than the existing issue of the sweatshops of developing countries.

  1. The Disappearance of the Bricks and Mortar Office

The downfall of the corporate office workspace and traditional employee has been predicted for years. I can remember during the dot.com boom everyone talking about the new economy and how a much more flexible workplace would mean that more and more tech workers could work from home or from random geographic locations. “Co-working” and “Digital Nomads” offer two solutions and address both the problem of isolation that freelancers experience working from home as well as the wander-lust that more and more workers exhibit. The benefits of co-working seem obvious, a “social” space whereby individuals work on their specific assignments while networking and sharing ideas sounds great. But individuals using these spaces report frequent interruptions, difficulty in locking in on their tasks and constant chatter about new and exciting opportunities…which just might be better than the one they are currently working on. And having a workforce, spread across the globe working off their laptop, probably on a beach in the tropics sounds idyllic. But even with the most disciplined worker, is it unfair to suggest that they might just be more inclined to disengage from work when presented with a constant temptation of leisure and recreational activities?  We are already in the middle of a trend that sees workers move jobs more frequently than at any time in history. The effort that goes into acquiring, training and retaining talent is already daunting. While co-working and digital nomads might not exacerbate the trend, I’m not convinced that it is the answer to productivity and retention.

  1. Driverless Cars

This is not so directly related to work but I was struck by this while I attended a presentation recently at the faculty of Engineering at the University of Alberta. The topic was driverless cars and looked at a future of networked, people movers which would move citizens and therefore workers to their destinations seamlessly and without accidents or other human-induced glitches. While the idea of relegating gridlock to the pages of history and reducing the human carnage of vehicle accidents is vastly appealing, the presenter mentioned that networked vehicles would also give the worker of the future a “work pod” connected at all times to their place of work while they travelled throughout the day. As we already know, it is getting harder and harder to disengage from work and the thought of a vehicle designed around my desk at work tends to make me cringe. Sure, we’ll also use the vehicle for fun…

 

  1. Retirement will be a Thing of the Past

For some, the ability to continue to work well past their retirement years is an attractive proposition. If you are in a job you love, retirement may not be something you aspire to. And with advances in health care and medical treatment, people are living longer. Demographic changes and an aging workforce may mean more opportunity for our seniors to stay gainfully employed. But for those who are looking forward to retirement their choices may be considerably more limited. Personal debt is at an all-time high and for many workers, the cost of living in large cities where the jobs are presents a massive strain on their budgets. People are living longer, putting more stress on their savings and the same advances in health care and medical treatment mentioned above, means that individuals will have to plan for longer lives. Seniors may very well represent a viable labour force, and for many of them, that may be a good thing. But for those who dream of a life of travel or fishing after their work years, those dreams may be out of their reach.

The future as always, holds the promise of fascinating advances in technology and with these advances, opportunities for humans to experience the world in new ways. Work is and will continue to be impacted by these changes and many of them should be positive. But we also need to be aware that none, in and of themselves, will work for everyone, nor solve all challenges and that the answer, probably does lie somewhere in the middle.