Talent Development Centre

Category Archives: Staffing Agencies

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to staffing agencies.

Land More Jobs by Building a Relationship with Your Recruiter

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

“Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success.” - Paul J. MeyerWhen you’re an IT contractor, working with recruiters is inevitable in your career, so maintaining a strong candidate/recruiter relationship should be top priority. Having an honest, open and trusting relationship with your recruiter is beneficial as you make major decisions throughout your career.  Just as every strong relationship has give-and-take, so is the one between the job seekers and the recruiters. Recruiters provide expertise, industry knowledge, industry contacts and job leads. They can also provide tips and guidance to improve your chances and direct you to the best job opportunities for you. So what’s the role of the IT contractor as the job seeker?

First, you need to help recruiters find you so you can do your part to build relationships with them. It is a known fact that more senior recruiters have an easily accessible pool of highly qualified candidates. These are people in their network that they often refer to first when they are recruiting for a job opportunity. If you’re not in that pool then you’re making your job search a lot more difficult. The internet and social media are swimming with candidates who are constantly applying to positions and you need make sure you are standing in front of the competition. So, start by building your social media presence including LinkedIn, Twitter and any local boards. Recruiters often use job boards and social media to find their candidates so make it easy for them to find you. If you get unsolicited calls or emails from recruiters, take them and respond. If the job opportunity is not what you’re looking for, then the best advice is help them with their search by recommending people you know who are a fit. Recruiters remember candidates who are helpful, so it’s the perfect way to start building a relationship.

Another way to ensure you are building a strong relationship with your recruiters is to have conversations with recruiters in real-time. Meet your recruiters face-to-face whenever possible. Provide them with regular updates on your status and any exciting projects you are working on. Also, put in an effort to understand their business, how recruiting works, their recruiting cycle timelines and how you fit into that scenario. It is also important to gain expectations in the beginning. Having this general understanding can help you figure out which relationships to prioritize. You would want to prioritize recruiters who specialize in what you do.

Developing a relationship with recruiters benefits your future job search. Even if you aren’t immediately looking for a new job or if a particular job opportunity isn’t quite right for you, it’s worth it to find out more and use that time to develop that relationship. Recruiters are often the link to many potential employers. They know what’s happening internally at these companies and before most, know where the next vacancy will be. So always welcome opportunities to speak to recruiters.  Keep an open mind and you might be pleasantly surprised.

“Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success.” – Paul J. Meyer

Recruiters Love (and Need) Your Feedback

Recruiters Love (and Need) Your FeedbackAs with any top-performing professional, great recruiters strive to improve so they can better help IT professionals find the right job with the right client. Also like all professionals, recruiters can only get better if they know how to improve. They take the same approach you would to deliver better service to your clients (reviewing past successes and failures, professional development, etc.) but they too can only fix the shortcomings that have been identified to them.

Perhaps you consider giving feedback to a recruiter uncomfortable or even unnecessary, but there are several benefits to you that will make you thankful you did. First and foremost, as we already alluded to, feedback is the only way your recruiter can truly improve. Both positive and negative, when recruiters know what they’re doing right and in which areas they lack, the best ones will build off their strengths and work on their weaknesses. The result will be more positive experience next time you work with them.

If you don’t believe it’s your responsibility to help a recruiter with their professional development, then consider that it is your shared responsibility to ensure proper communication. Especially when you’re dissatisfied with what’s happening, talking about anybody behind their back will not solve the issue. Instead, by expressing concerns and sharing your feedback, you create an opportunity for dialogue. Often in these cases, miscommunications and misunderstandings of expectations are identified and processes can start to be fixed. Finally, sharing feedback with a recruiter helps relationships. A humble recruiter always appreciates feedback and when you demonstrate a genuine effort to help them improve, they will remember it next time a job comes across their desk that fits your skillset.

How Can You Give Feedback to a Recruiter?

Excelling at giving feedback is a challenging task for anybody and recruitment agencies understand that. Most will provide multiple options for you to give feedback, but here are just a couple common ones:

  • Contact the Recruiter Directly. The obvious one is to call, email or arrange a face-to-face meeting. Tell your recruiter exactly how they’re doing or how they did, what they should keep doing and where they need to improve. This is the best solution if you want dialogue but also the most awkward and may not suit everyone’s personality.
  • Surveys. When you receive a survey from a recruitment agency, complete it. Not only do you get to respond at your convenience, but it is the easiest way to give them what they want to know AND rant about anything else you feel is relevant. More importantly, survey responses are almost always guaranteed to be seen by your recruiter’s manager. If you feel your direct feedback wasn’t received properly, this will deliver the message.

Giving feedback — both positive and negative — is a natural part of a successful career. It’s a good habit to provide feedback to your teammates, partners, clients, and of course recruiters. In addition to giving it, it’s even more important to be able to accept feedback. For many, that’s an entirely different challenge.

How You Can Contribute to an Awesome Onboarding Experience

Alison Turnbull By Alison Turnbull,
Delivery Manager at Eagle

How You Can Contribute to an Awesome Onboarding ExperienceWe’ve all been there – starting a new job always means lots of uncertainty, heightened levels of stress and a general sense of discomfort.  Clients and employers have come a long way to ensuring the onboarding of both permanent employees and contractors is pleasant. In doing so, they strive to mitigate the stress that starting a new job tends to have on the vast majority of people.

Back in the day, it was common to have someone point to an empty desk, hand you a bottle of Windex and say “Off you go, figure it out!”  Luckily, companies have since recognized the importance of a robust onboarding program including socialization, training, wide spread introductions and announcements – all of which go a long way to fostering a feeling of inclusion.

As an IT contractor, independent professionals are accustomed to starting new positions on a fairly regular basis so tend to roll with the punches more so than most.  A good agency understands the importance of you having all of the tools and information you need to start an assignment successfully, and will do everything that they can to assist with that process.  But the contractor has a role to play in that as well.  In speaking with our back-office onboarding team, we asked what some of the common misconceptions or missteps were.  They confirmed that if you focus on just these four areas in the days leading up to your contract start date, it will ensure a much smoother onboarding process for all.

  • Have all requested paperwork completed. More importantly, complete all required fields, on time, and submitted as requested.
  • Ensure that all business paperwork is accurate. Everything you provide needs to be clear and correct. For example, confirm that your HST # is valid and that your chequing account is under business name rather than personal.
  • Know where to go for information. Your agency cannot (and should not) act as an accountant, a lawyer, or a business assistant. Be sure you have your own business considerations covered
  • Realize that staffing agencies can have different processes. Just because the recruitment agency you worked with last did things one way, it doesn’t mean it was the “right” way. You may have to adapt to a new (and potentially better!) way of doing things.

When you start a new contract it’s your job to get acquainted as quickly as possible and to hit the ground running.  Ensuring that all of your i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed from an administrative perspective will go a long way in allowing you to focus on what is important — doing a stellar job for your new client.

Customer Service – A Challenge for the Service Industry

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

A common challenge for any company in the service industry is building and maintaining strong, positive customer service. One airline in Canada recently sent out an email campaign thanking us for voting them the “best airline in North America, again.” I won’t mention names, but think about ANY airline that you know – there is so, so, so much room for improvement with all of them. You’d think that if they wanted to be honest, they wouldn’t say they were the best airline industry in North America, instead they’d use the slogan “we suck less!”

Staffing agencies struggle with this as well – yet we absolutely offer legitimate value in the service we provide. Without staffing companies, hiring would be extremely inefficient. Our industry’s intense focus on this one aspect results in our use of people, processes, and technologies that wouldn’t be cost-effective for individual companies to purchase/hire. The staffing industry saves our economy millions of dollars vs. what would need to be spent if there were no agencies. And from the consultant’s perspective, it is very hard to work on assignment and still find time to market themselves. Agencies have insight into opportunities that would be near impossible to find on their own.

Yet, our industry has an image problem. We are often seen as a “necessary evil”, rather than being embraced as a partner. As hard as we try, we are not able to please everyone all the time. Some relationships become strained and the result is dissatisfaction. At Eagle we try to be as reasonable as possible. But we still have a business to run, staff to pay, and technology in which to invest. We make it a point not to take advantage of people, but we cannot allow people to take advantage of us either. We try to set realistic expectations with both clients and consultants and do what we can to remain true. Sometimes business realities change and make it impossible to hold the line set. But when this happens we try our best to work through things with as much fairness and transparency as possible.

Eagle is ISO 9001:2015 certified, meaning that we have a quality framework that we use to manage our business and that the management team and staff are knowledgeable about our processes and committed to delivering quality always. Part of being certified is measuring how we are doing against our quality goals. For this we conduct monthly surveys with both our consultants and our clients to solicit feedback – what we’ve done well, what we’ve done poorly, and we look for opportunities to make our processes even better. All in all, this has worked well for us over the years.

However, the staffing industry, despite having strong industry associations such as ACSESS and the NACCB, requires no/limited licensing or certification requirements to participate. Anyone can hang a shingle on their door and they are a recruiter. Published codes of ethics for agencies exist and most follow the code set out by ACSESS, but they are not compulsory. Here at Eagle we have also implemented our own code of ethics. But a few bad apples can spoil things for all.  A case in point is the new “protective legislation” that the Ontario Government has put into place. The legislation is meant to protect at-risk temp workers, but as is often the case, the unintended consequences result in burdens on our industry and in some cases, the legislation actually hurts the very people that they were intending to help.

And what about incorporated consultants and contractors? They provide a service too. Their company is part of the service industry and has many of the same customer service challenges. If a consultant contracts directly to the end-client (a practice that has seen dramatic reductions thanks to some of the government legislation and CRA deemed-employee rules) then their client is the company that they work for. If, however, a consultant works through an agency then they have two clients – the agency who hired them and the company at which they are providing their services. Do contractors think of the agency as their client? Do they treat their agency as they would with other clients? The most successful consultants work in partnership with their agencies, coordinating and collaborating to find lucrative and successful engagements. These contractors are re-engaged by the agency for other opportunities as often as possible. Consultants offering poor customer service are not.

The service industry can be exciting, fast-paced, and rewarding. But it is hard as well. Any services-based company relies on their reputation to win new and (especially) repeat business and a big part of this is the level of customer service that is provided. This is important to Eagle as evidenced by our extensive investment in and commitment to our ISO quality standards. Managing a services business, regardless of its size, requires one to treat both customers and suppliers well. This is true for all companies within the Service Industry – airlines, staffing agencies, and for independent incorporated contractors alike.

A Beginner’s Guide to Recruitment Agencies

The Talent Development Centre is loaded with advice for working with recruitment agencies: How to choose an agency, how to grab a recruiter’s attention, questions recruiters will ask you, questions you should ask a recruiter, how to follow-up with recruiters, etc. But for newer job seekers and IT contractors, there are more basic questions that need to be answered: What does a recruitment agency do and why should I even work with them?

How Does a Recruitment Agency Work?

Recruitment agencies (also known as Staffing Agencies, Employment Agencies, Head-Hunters, etc.) help companies and organizations find workers, whether it be as full-time employees or for temporary, contract positions. Some agencies take a focused approach and recruit a specific skillset for their clients (for example, the majority of Eagle’s services centered are around IT contract professionals) while other companies take a broader approach and source a wide spectrum of talent for clients.

Recruiters at an employment agency usually conduct the complete recruiting and screening process for their clients, which includes not just searching, but also resume screening, interviewing, reference checking and negotiating with applicants. They continuously build relationships with professionals to understand their skills, interests and availability which ensures they can present candidates to a client as quickly as possible after receiving a request. Therefore, the end result of recruiters properly serving clients is that they also help job seekers find work.

How Do Recruitment Agencies Make Money?

Staffing agencies are always paid by the hiring company, and never by the job seeker.

In the case of permanent placements, the client usually pays the agency an agreed upon fee, which varies based on agencies, industries and roles. When a recruitment agency places a candidate in a temporary or contract position, the agency will hire that individual as a temporary employee or as an independent contractor in a business-to-business relationship. The agency then signs a contract with the client, stating they will provide somebody to perform the work. The staffing agency pays the individual for doing the work, and bills the client for both the cost of the individual and the cost of recruitment efforts. Hiring companies can be billed as a flat fee or an hourly rate that gets added to the worker’s hourly pay rate.

Should You Work with Recruitment Agencies?

You should cover every possible base when looking for a job and that includes talking to staffing agencies. Of course, applying to jobs directly and networking with people in your industry needs to happen, but so should building a relationship with a recruiter. They add value and help with your job search by providing access to unpublished job opportunities, providing advice to improve your resume, giving feedback on your interview skills, and connecting you to business resources such as contractor insurance (just to name a few).

Next time you’re scrolling through a job board and come across a bunch of postings from the same employment agency, don’t assume the situation is too good to be true. Apply to the job and meet the recruiter. While the job you originally applied to may no longer be available, you will be surprised at what else they can provide!

Do you have any other questions about staffing agencies and how they work? We’d love to clarify them for you! Just leave your questions in the comments below.

Bill 148: What Independent Contractors Need to Know

David O'Brien By David O’Brien,
Vice President, East Region & Government Services at Eagle

The Ontario Government introduced a sweeping legislation last fall regarding work and the ESA (Employment Standards Act). Many of the changes came into effect on January 1, 2018 with additional pieces that took effect April 1, 2018 and more to come on January 1, 2019.

Bill 148 covers an array of components. In addition to the headline-grabbing dramatic increase of minimum wage, there are changes to vacation entitlement, personal emergency leave, equal pay and termination of assignment pay for temporary employees, union certification rules and many others. All of these components have very significant impacts to employers and employees alike.

However, another very significant impact of Bill 148 that directly impacts independent contractors is employee misclassification. The new bill introduced a reverse onus provision whereby employers must demonstrate that any independent contractors they have engaged are not in fact employees.  Bill 148 shifts a substantial new burden of risk to employers and employment staffing agencies and will potentially have several unintended consequences as a result. As is often the case with activist governments, it is the unintended consequences of legislation that can be the most impactful.

In Ontario, it is estimated that about 12.5% of the total workforce of 5.25 million identify as self-employed, which is about 630,000 contingent workers. It is further estimated that of this group about 55,000 are knowledge workers in the IT, Engineering, Finance and Healthcare sectors, who bring significant economic impact to many of Ontario’s private and public sector organizations. The majority of these knowledge workers are independent, incorporated contractors. As the nature and notion of work transforms to a more project or engagement-based ideation, these knowledge workers are critical. With the modernization of our economy and overall productivity and competitiveness, our governments should be looking for ways to adapt to this new reality.

With the new legislation, when there is a question about whether an individual is an employee or independent contractor, the reverse onus provision is triggered. This means the burden lands on the employer or agency to prove the individual engaged with them is an independent contractor, not an employee and as such would be excluded from ESA coverage. As experience indicates, work moves offshore when employers are faced with impediments like this. Employers losing access to these valuable resources on a contingent basis should be very concerned.

Employers and staffing agencies are now looking at ways of assessing individuals to understand the true nature of relationships early on in engagements to ensure this risk is mitigated. These early assessments will help determine whether such individuals are properly classified as independent contractors.

As an independent contractor, there are a number questions you can ask to help establish the nature of your relationship with your clients. Here are a few of them to keep in mind:

  1. Are you providing services through a corporation?
  2. Have you registered with CRA for GST/HST?
  3. Do you carry business insurance, such as commercial liability or errors and omissions insurance?
  4. Do you market your services as a business, for example with a website, business cards, etc.?
  5. Do you have a corporate bank account, use business invoices in the corporate name and maintain corporate books and records?
  6. Do you have a written contract engaging your business? Is it for a fixed term period or completion of a project?
  7. Do you have the ability to determine how the services are provided?
  8. Have you invested his or her own financial resources into their business?
  9. Is there risk of loss or financial loss if the services are not successfully completed?

The answers to these questions will also help employers and agencies assess an individual’s status. There are numerous others that will have to be asked to help ascertain answers for all parties and ensure against employee misclassification. And just as important, independent contractors will need to be prepared to self-assess. Those who wish to be independent incorporated contractors should seek advice. Govern yourself as a business would and avoid acting or being treated as an employee.

12 Signs You’re Working with an Ethical IT Recruiter

12 Signs You're Working with an Ethical IT RecruiterIT contractors and job seekers have literally hundreds of technology recruiters to choose from when searching for new work. ACSESS, Canada’s staffing industry association, has more than 1000 member offices across the country, and that doesn’t include the many more employment agencies who don’t contribute. With that many staffing agency players, odds are that although most recruiters you deal with will be helpful, you’re bound to come across some who are terrible, lazy, rude or, worst of all, unethical.

Selecting an IT recruiter has many considerations — their connection to the market and opportunities, their ability to communicate, the additional value they bring, etc. — and whether or not they meet your ethical threshold. Unethical recruiters will not only fail to find you the right job, they also bring you down with them and tarnish your professional reputation.

The good news is that ethical recruiters can be easy to spot as long as you know what you’re looking for. Here are 12 traits all ethical recruiters share:

  1. They’re part of their staffing industry association and follow a code of ethics.
  2. They never ask you for money
  3. They want to meet you and get to know you, your skills, and your preferences
  4. They’ve taken the time to know a client and opportunity before presenting it to you
  5. They never exaggerate the opportunity or hide facts
  6. They’re clear about the hiring process (theirs and the client’s)
  7. They never try to push you into a role you’re clearly not a fit for
  8. They ask for your consent before sending anything to a client
  9. They never encourage you to lie
  10. They only let you update your own resume (or make a specific request to make updates and provide you with complete details)
  11. They work with the other recruiters within their agency, so you learn about all new opportunities
  12. They encourage you to work with other recruiters and agencies

If you can confidently check every one of these off of your list, then proceed and build that relationship!

If you’re working with a recruiter who doesn’t clearly meet one or more of these traits, we recommend treading carefully with your relationship and asking more questions. You may even consider moving on to another staffing agency. What other traits do you look for in an IT recruiter to judge their ethics?

Contractors/Small Business Owners: Your Agency is an Extension of your Marketing Department

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President, Western Canada at Eagle

Contractors/Small Business Owners: Your Agency is an Extension of your Marketing DepartmentAs an independent contractor, you are a small business owner. And just as every business needs to sell its products and services so, too, must you from time to time. Long term, multi-year contracts aside, contractors’ businesses are very often defined by frequent client engagements. When you are busy delivering your service it can be a challenge to find the time to market your company, after all there are only so many hours in a day. Likewise, sales isn’t typically your primary business and many contractors and consultants struggle with this part of their business (or, at least, it isn’t their favorite part of running the business).

What’s an independent contractor to do? There are some basic things that every small business can do to ensure they are getting their brand out to the market. These include:

  • Maintain a nice clean, easy-to-navigate website that lets prospective clients know what you do best and have accomplished
  • Ensure your LinkedIn profile is accurate and up-to-date… and “connect” with as many people as possible… and participate in work-related, online forums and chat groups
  • Invest in business cards and stationery, an important part of your branding strategy
  • Network, network, network… Just as a restaurant’s success has a lot to do with its location, your business success is a result of people in your industry knowing about you and the work that your company does better than anyone else. Getting out where industry peers and potential clients meet and engaging with these people is vitally important
  • Work your “champions”. If you’ve been in business for any length of time, you will have made some deep and lasting professional relationships. These people will want to see you succeed and knowing that you are interested in pursuing new opportunities, they will do their best to help you identify new prospects by making introductions.

…And, as the title of this blog suggests, leverage your staffing agency partners to the fullest! Your agency doesn’t technically work for you as it is their customer base that hires them to conduct searches on their behalf; but that doesn’t mean you can’t benefit from your affiliation with them. Especially when it comes to marketing your business. Eagle, for example, holds multiple networking events each year, we send out industry and market updates regularly, and our Recruiters are great sources of information and ideas. Staffing companies make their business by finding the best possible talent for their clients and, if you happen to be a good fit for one of their open roles, they will do the selling for you!

Staffing companies do not charge you (the contractor) to work for them. Instead their clients negotiate hourly fees that they will pay over and above the rates that you charge. Most end-clients are content to pay a premium to off-load the search, vetting, qualification, onboarding, hiring, and payment functions to staffing specialists as it is much more efficient and cost effective than doing so themselves. And they find the best talent available in the market this way. Therefore, you are able to charge your regular rates and get the benefit of agencies selling your services for you. Be sure to visit their job boards regularly and by responding to their Recruiters when they call, you will be better aware and engaged in new opportunities.

Other things you can do to help your agency partners to make a better impact on your sales efforts is to be consistent in your messaging. Branding is very important for any business… what is it about your business that sets it apart? If your website,and resume and “elevator pitch”/sales messages are all on-point and consistent it makes it much easier for Recruiters to understand your value proposition and to sell your company to their clients. Recruiters will often prefer a consultant who does one thing very well (and can demonstrate this through past work experience) to people who are good at a lot of different things. It is easier to sell and easier for the end-client to see where the “fit” is in their own teams; so tailor your branding and messaging to the job you want and communicate this to your agency.

Another little thing that makes a big difference is to invest some time into building relationships with key Recruiters that you trust. With very little effort you can build your Recruiter contact into a business champion of yours. Ensuring that you are reachable and making yourself available to meet or talk goes a long way towards building a Recruiter’s preference for working with you.

A lot has been written in Eagle’s Talent Development Centre blog site over the years about building strong and successful relationships with agency Recruiters. Any and all of these hold great tips that will turn an agency into a salesforce that works for you! Here are some links to these past articles:

Breaking the “Working and Not Selling” and the “Selling and Not Working” cycle takes some focused attention… but by spending some time getting your business’s Marketing program in place, you can avoid some of the time-gaps between engagements and develop your career in the direction for which you’ve planned!

9 Questions Independent Contractors Should Ask All Recruiters

Sam Rahbar By Sam Rahbar,
National Training Manager at Eagle

9 Questions Independent Contractors Should Ask All RecruitersAs an IT contractor/consultant, your relationships with IT recruiters can have a major impact on your job search journey. Especially since contractors are being distanced from the hiring managers and clients due to the introduction of MSPs (Managed Services Provider) & VMSs (Vendor Management Systems).

The days of working directly for an enterprise client and billing them directly are almost vanished. Your best and safest option is to go through an approved vendor.  As you might have already experienced, agencies (approved vendor or not) come in all shapes and sizes and unfortunately, not all operate under the same ethical guidelines. It is your responsibility to make sure that your best interest is a priority with your recruiter and agency of choice.

Just like recruiters ask questions to vet you, you need to do the same the first time you deal with each agency to make sure that they are ethical and trustworthy. Below is a list a list of questions that will help you find out more about an agency before working with them.

Where did you find my profile?

If you haven’t heard of that recruiter/agency before and/or if you don’t have your resume posted online, you’ll want find out how your contact info is surfaced.

This question could help with positioning your experience better; by knowing what they have seen/read so far. It also helps you find out which platform (Monster/LinkedIn/GitHub/..) gives you the most visibility.

What’s your specialty? (industry/vertical within IT or contract vs fulltime)

Tech space for be confusing and frustrating, especially for a non-technical person. When it comes to your career, you want to make sure that you are trusting recruiters who understand the domain (at least from a high level). A non-technical recruiter won’t be able to explain the client environment and what technologies are must-have vs nice-to-have and why.

Is this call regarding a job opportunity or just a status update?

This will help you market yourself more efficiently, whether it is for a specific role or for a general status update. Based on the nature of the call, do you want to take it now or later?

What is your history with this client/hiring manager? How long have you been working with them?

You want to be working with recruiters/agencies who know the clients and have a successful history, because they know the in’s and out’s of the client environment and hiring process. This can maximize your chances of getting the job by minimizing the surprises at the interview stage.

Are you the only one working on this role?

You want to know the competition. If the recruiter/agency you are working with has an “exclusive” order, this means:

  1. a) They have a really good relationship with the client
  2. b) They can tell you exactly what the competition landscape looks like.

What is the hiring process? Are there interview times booked?

Does the recruiter/agency know what to expect? Or are they just phishing for a resume to open doors with? If the timelines are set and clear, do they work for you?

How long has the job been open?

Sometimes the client is not sure what they are looking for and they use the interview process as a way to make up their mind. Or they have an internal candidate and they just want to make sure they are making the right choice. A job that has been open for more than 2 months is a red flag!

What is the full package? How flexible is the client?

Clients often look to save money by advertising the role with a lower rate than they’re willing to pay. If you genuinely feel your market rate is above the rate mentioned, it would not hurt to ask how flexible the client is willing to be.

What is next?

Always make sure that you are clear about the agency’s processes and next steps as it pertains to you. Are they sending your resume? When should you expect an answer? Can you talk to other recruiters in the same firm? What if you wanted to apply to a different job at the same client that they are sending your resume to?

Your conversations with recruiters should not be one way, it should be a dialogue in which you qualify their client list and their job opportunities and they qualify your skills and “fit” factor.

So, next time to talk to a recruiter for the first time, make sure to take an extra 2 minutes and ask questions so you can get to know them right at the get-go and avoid any time wasting down the line.

Should You Hold a Grudge Over Your Recruiter?

Should You Hold a Grudge Over Your Recruiter?Do you have to forgive a recruiter who’s done you wrong or made you angry during your job search? The simple answer is no, you don’t have to forgive anyone. There are plenty of staffing agencies in the market and you can easily find a new partner.

As with every other aspect of life, you never have to forgive somebody, but should you? That’s a more complex question, so naturally, has a more complex answer. Almost every personal development expert will tell you that holding grudges does little to improve your life, wastes a lot of energy, and can cause you to miss out on positive things in your future. While we don’t expect forgiving a recruiter will bring you eternal happiness, it may prevent you from missing out on future IT contracts. Before writing your recruiter and recruitment agency off the books forever, step back and ask yourself a few questions:

Why am I angry?

This is the first and most important question. After the dust settles, reflect on what made you so angry and decide if it is as grave a situation as it was when you were furious. Were your recruiter’s wrong-doings based on a mistake or lack of knowledge, or was it an ethical situation that speaks to who they are as a person?

Is it all the recruiter’s fault?

A tough question to ask yourself, but was there anything you could have done better to improve the outcome of this mishap? Often communication on both parts, or lack thereof, is the root a preventable misunderstanding.

Am I being empathetic enough?

Try to understand the recruiter’s point of view. They get pressure from many different directions and have to make difficult decisions.  Have you properly communicated the situation to your recruiter to give them a chance to make it right?

Does this issue reflect on an individual or the staffing company?

Staffing agencies are more than just the one or two recruiters you speak to. The best ones have solid processes that ensure you’re paid on time and protected tax-wise, as well as long-standing relationships with clients who have the best technology contract opportunities. It would be a shame to walk away from all of this because of a poor recruiter. If you truly can’t work it out with the recruiter, escalate to a manager so you can continue your relationship with the recruitment agency.

Forgive and forget?

We often hear the expression “Forgive and forget.” This may be true in playground rules, but does not apply in business. When somebody does you wrong, forgiving them is your choice, but there is no obligation to forget. While we do recommend moving on and continuing with business, it’s always safe to keep past situations in mind. Use what you learned to understand how you can work better together and proceed with caution where necessary.