Talent Development Centre

Category Archives: Working with Recruiters

Advice for IT job seekers and independent contractors in Canada when working with recruiters and staffing agencies to successfully get a job.

5 Requests Recruiters Might Have that Seem Odd or Intrusive, But Actually Make Sense

5 Requests Recruiters Might Have that Seem Odd or Intrusive, But Actually Make Sense

If you’ve been an IT contractor for long enough, then you’ve almost certainly connected with one or two recruiters who are… special. They don’t have a clue about your role, their role, or anything that’s going on. Other times, you work with a recruiter who is on the right track and then suddenly, they ask for something completely off-the-wall.  Where do these people come from?

Yes, some recruiters are a lost cause and hopefully they’re far and few between in your job search. But usually, when a recruiter requests something from you that is obscure or a little too intrusive, there’s a valid reason. Here are explanations for some requests that make IT contractors scratch their heads, but are actually an important part of the recruiting process:

They Ask for Your ID

You’re obviously of legal age and this gig does not require you to drive anywhere, so why is this recruiter asking for a copy of your drivers’ license? Sure, if you get the job and a security check is required, you’ll pass along that information, but you’re only just meeting for the first time!

Candidate fraud is a real and serious issue in the IT contracting space. Candidates will purchase a prefabricated resume filled with impressive projects, but when they start working, it’s clear they have absolutely no experience. Recruiters will often start by verifying your ID to ensure you are who you say you are and live where you say you live. When you arrive for an interview, they will also make sure they’re talking to the same person who appears on that ID.

They Ask Extremely Basic Technical Questions

You’ve almost definitely arrived in an interview only to be asked the most junior-level questions possible, making you scratch your head and wonder if the recruiter even knows how to turn on a computer. How can they possibly evaluate your abilities if they can’t pronounce the terminology?

Depending on the agency, some recruiters work on a variety of roles across different disciplines and industries. It would be impossible to understand all of them and, at this stage of the process, they really don’t need to. The recruiter is ensuring that you can discuss your resume and expand on projects (again, checking for candidate fraud), plus they are gaining an understanding of other softer skills. If you proceed to the next stage, then the client will have a technical person from their team dig deeper into those skills.

Recruiters asking basic technical questions can also be a very positive sign about their professionalism and who they are as a person. They genuinely want to learn more from you and understand the intricacies about your role. If you answer this recruiter’s basic questions today, you’ll have an entirely different conversation with them when you’re looking for your next contract.

They Ask for a Word Version of Your Resume

It’s common that IT contractors submit their resume in PDF format for security purposes. You thought carefully about how you want to represent yourself on paper and you don’ want anybody editing it to misrepresent you. Still, a recruiter comes back and asks you for a Word document. They must have ulterior motives!

Yes, very often the recruiter is asking for a Word document because they need to edit your resume, but not in that concerning way. Some clients will have strict requirements about the format in which they want your resume and what can be included on it. For example, to ensure a fair evaluation, they ask that some identifying information is omitted including names and contact information. If you really want to keep your resume in a PDF format, ask the recruiter if you can make those specific edits yourself and resubmit the PDF version of your resume.

In other cases, clients want to receive resumes in Word format so they can be evaluated and stored properly within their own internal tools. The client likely has experienced too many issues with their systems not reading PDF documents properly, so to minimize issues, they request a consistent format.

They Ask What Other Jobs You’ve Applied To

How is that any of the recruiter’s business?

The recruiter might just be starting friendly conversation to learn more about you and what kind of interests you have. More importantly, though, the recruiter is eliminating any risk of a double-submission.

Clients who work with multiple staffing agencies often include a strict policy about duplicate submissions. If two agencies submit the same candidate for a role, rather than fight out who gets rights to the original submission, the evaluator will eliminate both. So, it may seem that a recruiter is prying into your personal business by asking in-depth questions about applications with other agencies, but they’re actually ensuring your application with them isn’t immediately thrown out by the client (in addition to your application with another agency).

They Ask You Not to Talk to Clients

We occasionally get feedback from IT contractors who feel staffing agencies are a needless ‘middleman’ and that business could get done faster if the contractor could just connect with the client directly. Yes, that might be true if your position was the only IT contract the client has open, but Eagle’s clients tend to have more going on. It’s more efficient for them to only have conversations with a few select staffing agencies, rather than have direct communications and negotiate with hundreds of IT contract applicants at any one time. In fact, by contacting the client directly, you might be frustrating them and jeopardizing your chances of getting hired.

If you’re a seasoned veteran of the technology contracting space, these questions are probably just the tip of the iceberg for weird things recruiters have asked of you. We’d love to hear what else has made you scratch your head. Leave it in the comments and we’ll let you know if there’s a logical reason or a red flag.

When a Recruiter Calls and the Job Isn’t for You, Always Give a Referral

When a Recruiter Calls and the Job Isn't for You, Always Give a Referral

Graeme Bakker By Graeme Bakker,
Director, Delivery Strategy & Development at Eagle

Very often, if you receive a call from a recruiter about a job opportunity and you let them know it’s not for you, their immediate follow-up question will be to ask if you know anybody who might be a good fit. Do you put much thought into your response, or is your immediate reaction to turn them down and hang-up?

Referring talented people in your network is only be a good thing. Afterall, networking and word-of-mouth reputation is one of the primary ways the industry builds itself and perhaps the best tool you have to build a solid pipeline of job opportunities. There have been many times in my career where a referral from myself turned into a business opportunity for others just based on good networking and positive references. Here are three of the benefits you can get just by passing on a talented person’s contact information:

It Demonstrates and Builds Your Knowledge

Being able to guide a recruiter towards talented individuals displays to them that you not only know your own job, but you truly understand differing positions and roles in the IT space. As an added bonus, you gain more knowledge about what is being sought out in your industry. These discussions with recruiters let you ask questions and dig deeper into types of clients and projects. Maybe after a couple calls along these lines, you’ll pick up on a skill that is becoming ever hotter on the market. Calls like this lead to more positives in your knowledge of which clients are hiring and what skills and positions they are hiring for.

It Builds Your Network with Recruiters

It’s how our industry thrives! When you provide a reference, you’ll be helping somebody in your professional network AND making a strong connection with a recruiter. When that recruiter calls your talented referral and sees that they’re the real deal, they will pick up that you know what you are talking about and trust will continue to build. Now they will quickly come back to you when a role that better fits your skill set comes across their desk. They will also mention to their colleagues that you’re a smart person on the market, so your name gets out there even more. As an IT contractor, networking is invaluable.

It Expands Your Professional Reputation

When you’re regularly helping your talented colleagues land new gigs, you build up your professional network with confident, intelligent and hard workers in your industry. In the future, if you want to lead projects on a management or architectural/developer side, it will be good to know of people that can do a wide range of skills in all roles of your industry. Having them in your network as an acquaintance or colleague is great, but if you’ve also helped them land a job in the past because you referred them to a recruiter, it bolsters your reputation as an individual who respects competent work.

When a recruiter calls, if you’re able to give something to them while they are trying to give something to you, your relationship will skyrocket and you’ll reap the rewards. More importantly, when you make it a habit, your own knowledge, network and reputation improve exponentially, and as a result, more doors will open.

Landing an IT Contract with a New Recruiter

Landing an IT Contract with a New Recruiter

You’re scrolling through your favourite job board looking for your next contract, when you come across the perfect opportunity. The requirements mirror your skillset, you have plenty of experience in that industry and it’s scheduled to start right when your current contract is ending. But, as you double-check who posted it, this job is through a staffing agency you’ve never heard of before. After confirming with the recruiters who you know at other agencies, it’s certain, this job is only available through an unknown recruitment agency. How can you still guarantee a good shot at it?

Don’t Hesitate — Apply to the Job

If there’s any chance you might want to work on this contract (and you know you’re qualified), then apply to it. The recruiting world moves quickly and jobs close within days, sometimes hours, so you want your name in front of the recruiter as soon as possible. That being said, check the date the job was posted. If it’s been up for a couple weeks, it can either mean that the job has been filled OR the recruiter is struggling to fill it and you’re going to be their saviour. Either way, it’s good intelligence for the upcoming steps.

Also look carefully through the posting to see if there’s any reference to an individual recruiter who’s working on the role or direct contract information to learn more about the job. Finally, take note of the Job ID and the exact job title. These will be important for referencing the job in your upcoming conversation with the recruiter.

Do Some Research

Make no mistake, your upcoming conversation with the recruiter is going to be a sales call for your business, so prepare as any good sales person would before making a cold call. One of the first steps a sales professional will go through is researching the prospect.

Start by looking up the staffing agency. Check out their website, online reviews (ex. Google, Indeed, Glassdoor) and LinkedIn. Does this appear to be an organization who you want to do business with? Check if they appear to be ethical, if other contractors are satisfied with them, and whether they have many similar opportunities or if this job is a one-off.

Next, look-up a few of their recruiters on LinkedIn. If you have a name related to this specific job, even better, but if not, just find two or three who might be working on this job. Look for contact information, see if you have similar contacts in your network, and learn a couple tidbits of information about them.

Finally, conduct a few informal references. Although there are hundreds of recruitment agencies, the industry is still fairly close-knit. Between other recruiters and IT contractors in your network, somebody is sure to have worked with this recruitment agency before. Find out who and ask about their experience. Even better, see if somebody can give you an introduction to a recruiter.

Make that Cold Call

Now that you’ve applied to the job and armed yourself with the right information, it’s time to make that phone call, even if you still don’t know who you’re calling. Here are a few tips for a successful cold call with a recruiter:

  • Be prepared to speak with a receptionist first. If you don’t have a contact name, have the Job ID and job title ready so they can connect you with the right person.
  • Get the recruiter’s contact info. Before the receptionist transfers you, confirm the name, extension and email address of the recruiter they’re about to send you to. If they don’t answer their phone, you can now follow-up with them directly.
  • Provide a quick introduction. Grab the recruiter’s attention by telling them a bit about yourself, and more importantly, how you will help them. Tell them quickly which job you’re interested in, that you’ve applied, and why you qualify. There’s a chance the recruiter hasn’t even looked at applications yet because they started talking with professionals in their own network. You need to make sure they know that you’re the best option.
  • Be prepared for an interview. The recruiter might want to learn more about you right away, so make sure you’re ready for a phone interview if it turns into that.
  • Or be prepared to schedule a follow-up call. In other cases, the recruiter will want to schedule a follow-up call for when they have more time to chat.
  • Remember the Job might already be filled. If the recruiter brushes you off, telling you the job is already closed, don’t end the call quite yet. Dig for information about similar jobs in the future and how you can be considered right away. Make sure the recruiter knows who you are and the skills you possess.
  • Send a follow-up email. Finally, regardless of the outcome of the call, send a follow-up email, including your resume and contact information. Especially if you have a good feeling about this recruiter and staffing agency, you’ll want to keep this relationship growing.

Everybody needs to cold call a new recruiter sometimes, whether you’re starting your career and trying to build a name for yourself in the IT contracting world or you’re an experienced professional who needs to start working with a new staffing agency. Hopefully these tips will help you get there quickly and effectively, easily landing you that job and a new relationship for future IT contract opportunities.

How to Make Sure You’re Paid on Time

How to Make Sure You're Paid on Time

Of all of the benefits of IT contracting, a steady and reliable pay cheque is not at the top of the list. Work is not guaranteed and you always have to set cash aside for the slow periods. Even when you do have a gig, all independent contractors have a story about payments arriving late which can have a ripple effect on your life.

Especially if you’re set-up as an incorporated business, you have a responsibility as the supplier of services to provide the proper requirements and paperwork to the client before they’re obligated to make payment. There is no employer/employee relationship that mandates you receive your pay cheque on time. Here are a few tips to help make sure your money gets to you when you need it:

Get Set-Up and Understand the Process as Soon as Possible

As soon as your new contract is signed, scour the documentation and ask your recruiter questions about how their payment process works. Every staffing agency has unique processes so don’t assume it will be the same as your last gig. As soon as possible, be sure to send over all of the documentation they ask for, such as EFT information and business details. Submitting this at the last-may hold-up your first payment.

Respect Deadlines

Don’t just get your EFT information submitted on time, but ensure your approved timesheets are always submitted on time throughout the entire contract. Know the deadlines for each period and set reminders in your calendar so you can complete the documentation as necessary. Since each client will have different requirements, some timesheets will need more detail and, therefore, a time commitment from you. Build that into your planning.

Follow-Up with Your Approver

This is the part of the process where you have less control but you can still take some ownership. When you notice your timesheet has not been approved and the deadlines are looming, give the approver a nudge. It may have gone to spam or there might be a discrepancy they’ve been meaning to discuss with you. Either way, when deadlines are missed and your pay doesn’t arrive, pointing blame back to the approver won’t bring your money to you any faster.

Pay Attention to the Detail on Your Invoices

Going back to point number one, understand what your staffing agency has to see on your invoice before making a payment. Perhaps its detailed timeframes or explanations of projects. If you’re charging HST, the proper HST number must be included. It would suck not to receive timely payment simply because your invoice was missing a line that would have taken you a minute to include.

Ask Around About Your Agency

Let’s back-up to before you even accept a placement. Did you reference check your new recruitment agency? Surely your network will have a few other contractors who have worked with this company in the past, so ask them those important questions, including information about their time entry process and reliability for payments.

There are plenty of ways the time-entry, invoicing and payment process can go off the rails when you’re on contract, but the five tips above are the most common preventative measures you can take. Throughout your placement, continue following-up and asking questions to ensure things are running smoothly, and hold the staffing agency accountable if they do miss payment at no fault of yours. Finally, take advantage of all the tools at your disposal. Accounting software, calendar apps, reminders, the client’s timesheet system — all of these tools combined will help you get your time submitted quickly and properly, and ultimately, paid on time.

6 Tips for Staying Patient in Your IT Job Search, at Work or Pretty Much Anywhere in Life

6 Tips for Staying Patient in Your IT Job Search, at Work or Pretty Much Anywhere in Life

There’s a common saying “Patience is when you’re supposed to get mad, but you choose to understand.” As our lives get busier and stress rises, this couldn’t be more important. We interact with people every day in both our work and personal lives, and some of them are… well… unique. As much as some individuals make your head want to explode, how you deal with them, specifically the patience you show them, defines your character and can have an extreme impact on your career.

As an IT contractor, your patience is tested every day of your professional life. Just looking for new gigs and waiting to hear back from clients or recruiters requires patience, and trying to explain your background and experience to some of them can be a complete other challenge. While on contract, you need to wait on team members to deliver parts of a project, help others understand concepts that seem basic to you, and stand by for client direction or feedback.

Yes, there is no shortage of opportunities to pull your hair out. But a lack of patience builds up more stress than necessary, rushes things that shouldn’t be rushed and, most harmfully, ruins relationships. Strong relationships are not just a necessary component to mental health. Professional connections with people who admire your character and approach to working under pressure are a key component to finding new job opportunities and succeeding in your current role.

So how can we foster patience and develop a reputation as that cool and collective colleague? We checked-in with some experts and scoured the research, and here are our six favourite tips:

  1. Know what you can control. There’s no use losing sleep, getting angry, or trying to rush along a process that simply isn’t going to go faster. Understanding when to move onto something else and accepting reality is the first step in being patience and reducing stress.
  2. Understand how important it is. And when it is a situation you could potentially control or hurry along, is it really worth it in the big picture? There’s only so much capacity we have for worrying so letting go of the less important items gives you patience for the more relevant matters.
  3. Take a break. Whether it’s a walk around the block, a phone call to friend, a healthy snack or meditation, take a few minutes to pause and breath. Clearing your mind allows you to gain a new perspective and consider the first two points above (is it in your control or even important?).
  4. Accept the situation. “It is what it is.” A saying that drives some people nuts but is also incredibly true. Things are taking longer than expected and you might have to jump through more hoops to get them done, but nothing will change that. Roll-up your sleeves, jump in, and do it.
  5. Befriend the situation. Better yet, don’t just accept it, embrace your circumstances. Take on the challenge and remember that you will be a better person. Whether you’re waiting for that slow colleague to finish a deliverable or coming up with unique ways to find your next gig, you will learn something if you allow yourself to.
  6. Be aware of your feelings. It’s alright to be angry and frustrated. We’re human and those emotions are natural, especially when stress is building up. Recognizing those feelings, though, is your first step to controlling them and moving them away. Or consider removing yourself completely until you’ve regained your patience (see tip #3)

Patience certainly is a virtue and we can all use more of it. It lowers stress levels, improves team dynamics, increases productivity and, above all, builds relationships. How do you manage your patience when you’re on the brink of exploding?

You’re Coming Off a Long-Term IT Contract… What Now?

You're Coming Off a Long-Term IT Contract… What Now?

Graeme Bakker By Graeme Bakker,
Director, Delivery Strategy & Development at Eagle

There’s nothing better than getting into a groove with the right client on the right project. The work is exciting, the team is fantastic and the pay isn’t so bad either. As you build relationships and get deeper into the project, your client is thrilled to extend your contract a few times, and before you know it, this has been your main gig for a few years. But alas, all good things must come to an end. The project is complete and as much as the client would love to reassign you, there just isn’t much going on right now. Suddenly, you find yourself back on the market.

Here are a few tips if you’re finding yourself job searching, or plan to be soon, and haven’t been in these shoes for a while:

  • Be proactive. If you are coming off of a lengthy contract, make sure to get ahead of your search and give yourself plenty of time before the current contract runs out.
  • If you take break, do it with caution. Many senior consultants will tell me that they are not worried about taking a couple months off if they can’t find something right away. This is not a good move as the majority of the time those couple months can add up to more time than you are comfortable with. In today’s market, it is never a bad idea to always have ‘irons in the fire.’
  • It’s going to be work, and you should be prepared for that. The market is always changing and what was in-demand and trendy might not be the way of the world since you were last looking for a role. You might have to interview more than once and the first role you interview for might not go through. Be prepared to do some work on your resume, put the ego aside and get all the information you can from your recruiter.
  • Stay connected. Speak with a recruiter (and continue to do so on all your contracts) so that you can keep your ear to the ground and are aware of what to expect since you were last interviewing. Staying up to date on the market trends throughout all your contracts is a good way to stay educated on what is expected for the next job.
  • Network! If you are not still doing this, it would be a good time to get back into networking events to put yourself out there and start to get used to selling yourself and your skills again. This will allow you to work out the interview muscles and get used to being forward about your accomplishments.
  • Be open to permanent roles. You might have been on the contract for quite a while and enjoyed the stability. In the current landscape and market we are in now, permanent roles are surfacing more and more. Be open to all opportunities, you never know.

Being back on the market after a long IT contract can be daunting and nerve-wracking. Fortunately, you don’t have to go it alone. Reach out to your favourite tech recruiter and I guarantee they’ll be happy to get you on your way and into your next placement before you know it.

Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Apply for the Same Job with Multiple Recruiters

Here's Why You Shouldn't Apply for the Same Job with Multiple Recruiters

Cherifta Daniel By Cherifta Daniel,
Recruitment Specialist at Eagle

In a world filled with worry and uncertainty during one of the biggest global challenges ever seen, unemployment rates have skyrocketed. Quarantine has inflamed and incited many emotions, one of which is candidate frustration with the job market. As a result, there has been an increase in the number of candidates applying for the same job with different recruiters. Is this okay? Absolutely not. The reasons why may surprise you.

In the wonderfully dynamic world of recruiting, this situation is called a “Double Submission.” It should be made clear that it is okay to work with multiple recruiters. In fact, this is encouraged as this can only increase your chances of finding a job because no one agency can cover all jobs in a local market. However, applying for the same job with different recruiters is no bueno.

It Doesn’t Increase Your Chances

There is a misconception that engaging with two recruiters to submit to the same job can improve your chances of getting an interview. This is not the case. Doubly submitting yourself for the same position is not like entering a raffle where the more tickets you buy (in this case resumes you submit), the greater your chances of winning the grand prize will be. This in fact has an adverse effect. Instead of getting you steps closer to your dream job, this is what can happen:

Blacklisted from the Hiring Company

Hiring companies use recruiters to gain access to top talent that they are unable to find on their own and to also streamline their recruitment processes. This is a way for them to also control the number of applications they receive — essentially serving as a direct prevention method for double submissions. By applying through different agencies, you are contradicting the purpose of this process and this can get you blacklisted from the hiring company. If you are blacklisted this means that you will automatically be disqualified from ever being considered for any future opportunities with this particular company. Additionally, you also run the risk of this company recommending other organizations in the same industry to not hire you. Your odds don’t seem too great anymore!

You Burn Your Bridges (Scorch Them)

When you work with a recruiter and you agree to have that person and company represent you for an opportunity, you seal this agreement typically in writing by email. This agreement is your word (your bond) that this recruiter (or recruitment company) is the only one allowed to represent you for this particular position — meaning you also cannot apply with any other agencies or directly to the hiring company. Going through multiple recruiters for the same position is a breach of ethics. You jeopardize the relationship that you have with your recruiter and create a lack of trust. Additionally, all of the hard work and efforts that went into your submission have now become futile.

Recruiter Wars

When you apply to the same position with multiple recruiters, no one wins — not even you. Additionally, this behavior can make the recruiting agencies that you are working with look as though they did not do their due diligence in securing your candidacy. In the end, this could create a situation where, if the client wants to interview you, you have a battle of agencies fighting over you because you gave them all the right to represent you for the same position. Companies do not like fighting over candidates, much less over who gets a finder’s fee. It is just too messy!

Time to take a beat. What’s the lesson here?

It is not okay to do and ask for forgiveness later. If you are unaware or unsure if you are applying to the same position with another recruiter, ask questions before you agree to be represented. Honestly communicate what your job search activity looks like. If you are also unsure about whether or not a recruiting company would 100% submit you for the opportunity, have an open conversation and work with a company that you can trust. Be subtle, yet impactful. Have a carefully crafted resume that mimics your personality, background, and skillset and submit this to only one recruiter. Be confident in your application and what you put out. Finally, be patient — it is a virtue!

Sick of People Pronouncing Your Name Wrong? LinkedIn Built a Solution!

Sick of People Pronouncing Your Name Wrong? LinkedIn Built a Solution!

Do you have one of those names? When you were a kid, while the teacher took attendance, there was a slight pause before reading your name, followed by a complete mess of what you thought should be an obvious pronunciation. And then it continued through the years. MCs, announcers, even your own friends completely mutilate your name, and they always find new, unique ways to do it.

Your professional life isn’t immune to these awkward situations either. When a recruiter calls for the first time, they slowly try pronouncing it three different ways until you finally interrupt and correct them. In an interview, your client-to-be confidently calls you something completely wrong… how and when are you going to correct this? Do you accept that this is your name for the duration of the contract?

A hard-to-pronounce name will never rule you out of jobs or hurt your chances of getting an interview. It does come with some frustrating moments in your career, though, so what can you do about it? The first-place recruiters, clients or employers learn about you is typically your resume, so why not start there? Resume experts have recommended a number of tactics:

  • Including an easier to pronounce “nickname” (this only works for a first name)
  • Writing out your name fuh-nEt-i-klee underneath the actual spelling
  • Including relatable tips on how to say your name (ex. sounds like _____________ )

You can also just include the address of your LinkedIn profile because the professional social network has stepped in to save the day!

LinkedIn’s Name Pronunciation Tool

Back in July, LinkedIn released a new tool that they say helps employers create a good first impression and build an inclusive workplace. As a bonus, it helps you minimize the many variations you hear of your name! The tool is extremely easy to use and quick to set-up, but you will need the LinkedIn mobile app to get started.

From the app, simply go to your profile and select to edit it. You’ll see an option by your name that says “Name Pronunciation”. From there, you can record yourself saying your name, slowly and clearly, as long as it fits within a 10 second timeframe. Now when anybody views your profile, whether in an app or a browser, a speaker icon will appear beside your name. When clicked, the user will hear exactly how your name should be said.

If you haven’t already, set-up your LinkedIn name pronunciation today. If you have one of those names, leave a comment in your resume or highlight in your LinkedIn profile, letting visitors know how easy it is to say your name properly.

LinkedIn's Name Pronunciation Tool

Quick Poll Results: Most IT Contractors Prioritize Service Over Rate

Top IT contractors are inundated with phone calls from recruiters and sometimes they’re all trying to sell you the exact same role. As that in-demand contractor, you choose who you will work with and, specifically, which recruiter represents you on that client’s opportunity. In last month’s contractor quick poll, we set-out to understand how you make that decision.

There are a number of factors you consider before being bound to a staffing agency for the length of your contract, and all are important. But we asked independent contractors which was their highest priority. The results are below and we learned that an overwhelming majority want to work with the agency who will give them the best service, while only a smaller percentage say that rate is the most vital factor.

Quick Poll Results: What is your top consideration when deciding which recruitment agency to partner with on a gig?

Do you agree? Let us know in the comments below!

Why Are Staffing Agencies Important for the Hiring Process

Eagle’s founder, Kevin Dee, recently had the opportunity to participate on a panel in a webinar hosted by CPA4IT. The event, titled The Future of Work for Independent Contracting Webinar, set out to discuss how Canadian IT contractors can survive and thrive in this time and what practical tips that they can utilize to achieve success at work as an Independent Contractor.

One topic discussed was the value of staffing agencies, both for clients in the hiring and contracting process, as well as for IT contractors looking for work. Below is a clip of Kevin Dee’s insight on the topic, including how companies are seeking to improve efficiencies, as well as protect contractors from being deemed an employee by the CRA.

Eagle’s CEO, Janis Grantham, is joining the panel for the next webinar hosted by CPA4IT on Thursday, October 22nd. They’ll be building on the previous discussion and answering questions about the future of work for independent contracting in Canada. Click here to register today.