Talent Development Centre

Category Archives: Job Search

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to job searching.

Dating Advice for Your Job Search: How to Have a Great First Date (or Job Interview)

Dating Advice for Your Job Search: How to Have a Great First Date (or Job Interview)

A few years ago, we shared a post with general dating advice and compared it to your job search. As we noted then, “Finding a recruiter, building your relationship and working to get a job through them can be a long, complicated, some-what awkward and sometimes painful experience… not too different from dating.” The advice followed the entire job search/dating process. Let’s look at a more specific stage and dive into how to make your first meeting successful, using this Readers Digest “First Date” article as a guideline. They summarized 9 secrets for a perfect first date that can all be applied to that first interview with either a recruiter or a client.

1. Reassess Your Expectations

Be sure you’re realistic going in and understand what can or cannot come out of this interview. Is the recruiter just meeting you to understand your experience, or is there a specific job already available? Are you one of the only contractors the client interviewing and the job’s a sure-thing, or is this just the start of a long competition?

2. Dress to Impress

While many workplaces and clients’ sites are leaning towards a more casual culture, dressing to impress your job interviewer never goes out of style. That’s not to say you must wear a suit and tie. Jeans and a nice shirt can look professional and appropriate, but they can also make you look like a slob. Choose a new, clean pair of jeans and a collared shirt with a neutral design and no words or logos.

3. Pick a Safe and Comfortable Environment

If there’s a chance your interview environment isn’t going to be safe, you might want to reconsider this job opportunity all together. But, there is still some job interview validity to this piece of dating advice. Often times, the first meeting with a recruiter will be over a casual coffee and they will let you choose a location. Select a venue that is comfortable, close and not loud to ensure a great conversation.

4. Be Courteous

We can take Reader’s Digest’s dating advice on this point almost word-for-word for job interviews: Manners say a lot about a person. Punctuality is essential, so if you are running late, give your [Interviewer] a call to let him [or her} know. During the [interview], keep your cellphone on silent mode and answer only urgent calls. Most importantly, say “please” and “thank you.”

5. Keep the Conversation Light

Your first interview is rarely the time to get into nitty gritty details and bargain for rate. Focus on understanding each other, giving the interviewer the best impression of who you are and what you can do. Don’t forget, a conversation goes two ways. Listen actively and ask follow-up questions to guarantee you fully understand the opportunity, the client and hiring process.

6. Split the Costs on a First Date…But Offer to Pay if You Made the Invitation

There shouldn’t be any costs to your first date except for maybe coffee, in which case sure, split it or offer to pay. You might also incur costs like parking or transportation. Unless there are extraordinary circumstances or a previous agreement, you will eat these costs. Handing your interviewer a receipt to reimburse half of your Uber is unlikely to create the ideal first impression.

7. Make Your Intentions Clear from The Start

IT contractors enjoy flexibility in where they work, when they work and for whom they work, but they also need to respect their client. When you plan to work from your home office, take a specific vacation, or juggle multiple contracts, be up-front about your intentions. If it is a major issue (which it rarely is), you can end the interview and both move-on. Otherwise, it prevents surprises and tricky conversations down the road.

8. Smile and Have a Good Time

In this section, Reader’s Digest says, “A date is supposed to be more fun than a job interview.” Ouch! Job interviews should be human and real. While we don’t recommend cracking jokes and telling stories about your college days, you can smile, laugh a little, and leave your mark as a positive person.

9. Remember, There Are Plenty of Fish In The Sea

You might realize part way through the job interview that it simply isn’t for you. Maybe it’s in the wrong part of town, your skillset doesn’t match the requirements, or you’ve had a bad experience with the client. No problem! End the interview early to avoid wasting anyone’s time and keep on moving.

Preparing for an Interview? Use this Worksheet.

Prepping for an Interview? Use this Worksheet.

Brianne Risley By Brianne Risley,
Director, Delivery Strategy & Development at Eagle

Have you ever walked out of an interview knowing you nailed it? Has the reverse also happened where you agonized over your responses hours, or even days later, wishing you had answered a question differently?

How you prepare for your interview can make or break your important meeting.

I created the worksheet below to accomplish two things: To cement your personal brand, and to help you pull out as much detail as possible on recent roles to answer any interview question with textured, specific, and fulsome answers. The detail you provide in your responses can move your interview from ‘good’ to ‘great’ in the eyes of a hiring manager, and can really help with your poise and confidence during the meeting.

You owe it to yourself to make your next interview as painless as possible. Try this framework out; I’m confident it will make a difference. You are about to really impress a hiring manager!

Step One: Fill out the worksheet 2-3 days prior to your interview. You will prepare detail for your most recent 3 contracts, or last 5 years of work experience – whichever you deem to be the best overview of your experience.

Step Two: Use all the detail you organized to answer sample interview questions using the STAR interview technique (more details below). Remember, most candidates struggle to provide specific examples of their experience during an interview. After taking the time to layout your recent experience in the worksheet, your answers will flow.

Interview Prep Worksheet

PART I: Your Personal Brand/”Tell Me About Yourself”

Here you will perfect your 30-second ‘elevator pitch’ and your brand/value proposition for a client. Every interview, (and every dinner party!) starts with some form of this question. Determine what yours is and you can add it to your header on Linkedin.

  • What I am:
  • What I’m great at:
  • Who I help:
  • What I want:

“I am a career Business Analyst with a passion for helping business teams re-imagine their legacy applications into the cloud. I’m looking forward to hearing more about your project and sharing how I can help.”

PART II: Detailed Experience Worksheet

Complete this for your most recent 3 contracts, or last 5 years of work experience – whichever you deem to be the best overview of your experience.

  • What is the nature of the project that you were working on? (Why was it needed by the business?)
  • Describe your responsibilities/breakdown your day. How much time do you spend on what activities each week(%)?
  • What size team are you working with? (your internal team, vendors, roles, size of user-base)
  • Who were you liaising with (business units? other developers? vendors?)
  • What major challenges did you encounter on the project? What was your role in handling the challenge?
  • What successes (small/large) did you achieve?
  • What tools/technology did you use in your role or were present in the technology environment? (versions?)
  • What was the Result? (specifics around how you made money, saved money, or changed a business process that did both)
  • Lessons learned?

PART III: STAR Interview Technique

Reference your worksheet to provide detailed answers to interview questions using the STAR interview format:

  • Situation:The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself.
  • Task:The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation.
  • Action:What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what were the alternatives.
  • Results:What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives. What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?

PART IV: Sample Interview Questions

These are the top 5 most common interview questions for you to practice against.

  1. What is your greatest accomplishment to date and can you relate that to the job you are applying to?
  2. What drives you, personally and professionally? What are you passionate about?
  3. How would you deal with an underperforming team member that you are responsible for?
  4. Tell me of a time when things did not go as planned that you had to deal with a very upset person. What happened? Why? What did you do?
  5. What are you looking for? Describe the ideal job description for you.

Soft Skills Are More Important Than Ever When It Comes To Landing A Gig

Soft Skills Are More Important Than Ever When It Comes To Landing A Gig

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

With labour supply shortages becoming ubiquitous (in the local business market, provincially, nationally and around the world), forward-thinking companies with means are changing up the hiring strategies used even for technical roles… and especially for new, emerging, hard-to-find skills. When the world was in a “buyer’s market”, employers could ask for a shopping-list of attributes and, with a little patience, they could expect to hire close to an exact version of their “perfect candidate”. This is no longer true and hasn’t been true for some time now… and companies are coming around to the idea.

Progressive companies are more and more often hiring people using criteria that includes some basic level of education/experience along with a number of specific, highly valued, non-technical characteristics. We’re basically talking attitude, aptitude and business/people skills. These companies expect to train new hires to be able to do the jobs for which they are hiring. In this way, they are acquiring smart, motivated employees and investing in them to get them to where they need to be technically. The following chart from recent CompTIA research shows that only 3 of the 9 most desired skills are directly technology related.

CompTIA - Skills IT Managers are Looking for When Hiring

One such example of a company looking to invest in training, is AT&T. It has dog-eared $1 billion to re-train their staff to bring their skills sets up to what is needed by the company. Although this appears to be an enormous sum of money, they’ve calculated that it is cheaper to train than to release and (hopefully) re-hire people with the desired technical skill sets. The cost of releasing and then re-hiring is over 20% of the employees’ yearly salaries; and AT&T found that retraining staff has a smaller impact on the actual day-to-day business, they get to keep valuable knowledge-capital in the business, and there is significant improvements in employee engagement, satisfaction and retention.

For independent contractors this message should solidify a couple of things for you:

1) If you are a SME in a particular area and you are able to keep yourself on the leading edge of technological developments, the world is likely to be your oyster. You will be somewhat of a scarce resource and highly coveted.

2) If you find yourself with older, somewhat out-of-date skill sets you might try to emphasize the business/communication skills that you have built or the transferable skills that you are bringing with you. Through an understanding of the role for which you are applying, bring out these soft skills showing how they will help you to become the resource they need. With CRA rules being what they are, you may need to consider taking a permanent role so that the company can invest in your training.

Or… You can invest in yourself, upgrading your skills to better align with the business. But any way you approach it, know that hiring managers are more and more interested in the soft skills applicants bring with them. The following is a list (not exhaustive) of the soft skills employers find valuable. I encourage you to work some of this into your resume and interview conversations!

Soft Skills Employers Look for in People
Source: TIQ Group – Soft Skills Employers Look For In People

These Weekend Python Projects Look Impressive on a Resume

Are you a new developer looking for Python jobs but need to bulk up your resume? Often, especially if you still haven’t built much work experience, creating projects and including them with your application helps showcase your programming experience, as well as your general computer science knowledge. This Tech With Tim video provides examples of two impressive Python projects that he says you can finish in a weekend: a Sudoku Solver and a path finder.

Outside-the-Box Job Interview Tips

Getting called in for a job interview is a good sign. It means your qualifications on paper are strong enough that a recruiter or client believes you’re worth meeting in-person. You’ve already beaten out dozens, possibly hundreds, of other applicants and now your job is to prove to your interviewer that you’re also better than the other applicants they’re meeting.

Strong answers and good technical knowledge about the project are going to help you succeed in the job interview, but let’s face it, any good IT job candidate will do the same. You need some unique strategies to set yourself apart, and this infographic we found from Forbes might be your ticket. They recommend ideas that few job seekers follow-through on:

  1. Go Beyond the Homepage
  2. Use Google Alerts
  3. Aim for 10:30am Tuesday
  4. Craft your Story Statement
  5. Wear a Fashion Statement

All of the details are below and, while doing all of them still won’t guarantee your job interview success, they will definitely help you stand out in the crowd.

Good luck!

Outside-the-Box Job Interview Tips

Your Client’s Workplace is Toxic — Time to Get Out!

Your Client’s Workplace is Toxic -- Time to Get Out!

Professionals often go into the gig economy to work for themselves because they don’t want to answer to a boss or manage employees. IT contractors know that, although their company and decisions are their own, they still need to answer to a client and, more dreadfully, work with their employees and put-up with their office shenanigans.

Most client workplaces are great. The weird employees, freeloading team members and awkward individuals will always exist, but for the most part, the environments are bearable and you’re capable of delivering on your requirements. Then, there are those other client sites. The toxic workplaces where nobody is happy, you can’t get anything done and, and it starts to take a toll on your mental health.

How can you tell if you’ve joined an IT project team that’s part of a toxic work environment? There are a number of common signs, many of which are summed up well in this Inc. article. Generally, you’ll notice that a toxic office has low energy and motivation among all the employees. They might seem happy and agreeable, but when you pull back the curtains, you notice that people are gossiping about each other, working in silos and cliques rather than teams, and having unofficial sidebar meetings.

Once you’ve been at the client site for a little longer, additional signs start to pop-up. The lazy people are still getting away with murder, others are getting promoted based on no merit whatsoever, and the few people who were an asset to your project slowly start to leave.

Now the bells are going off and you realize that there is no way you can be successful in an environment like this. Regardless of your experience as an IT contractor, there’s only so much you can do to make technology projects succeed. If the organizational support is not there, you’re sure to crash and burn, and your reputation will take a hit. So, what do you do?

Don’t Give-Up Too Easily

If the contract doesn’t have much time left on it, keep your head down and focus on your deliverables without getting sucked into the drama. Working from home when possible and avoiding the toxic individuals will help.

Cover Your Bases

You also need to think of self-preservation. An environment like this means employees are going to throw you under the bus whenever possible, so you need to be prepared. Document all your work and conversations. When somebody tries to point the blame your way because they didn’t complete a task or messed-up a deliverable, your notes and emails might be your only saviour.

Keep Your Recruiter in the Loop

Staffing agencies bring value to IT contractors in several ways, one of which being that they help you navigate these situations. Let your recruiter know that something’s sour in the environment as soon as you notice it so they can help you find solutions. Most importantly, be upfront if you think leaving might be the only option, providing plenty of notice. This popular post by Morley Surcon includes tips on how to leave a contract early, if it’s absolutely necessary.

A toxic work environment is a brutal place to have to spend 40 hours a week, but unfortunately, they exist across all regions, in all industries. If you find that yourself in one when you start your placement, act fast by either developing your plan to adjust and succeed, or preparing an exit plan that keeps your integrity intact.

The Growing Skills Gap, The Pace of Change… and the Critical Importance of Chosen Assignments

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

The Growing Skills Gap, The Pace of Change… and the Critical Importance of Chosen Assignments

There are several factors that work together to create a “skills gap” within the labour market in Canada (and worldwide for that matter). Local gaps can occur in any market based on competing projects using similar technology that eat up available resources; or, perhaps, a company wants to try something new-to-the-region and existing tech-professionals just don’t exist in that location. These gaps happen all the time and are, typically, short-lived as labour is quite mobile. However, our industry is noting a growing technological skills gap in general. This is across multiple regions and, in fact, around the globe. The aging workforce (baby boomers retiring or about to retire) – coupled with – too few young people to replace them – coupled with – not enough students taking the STEM education needed to fill new roles -coupled with – an explosion in tech-related jobs… all work together as a “perfect storm” to create a growing and pervasive technology skills gap.

But there is still another reason, one that I wish to highlight, and it is one that effects many contractors and consultants: The pace of change in technology. Technological change has never been faster. There are a multitude of new technologies that didn’t exist even a few years ago. And there are more areas of specialization/differentiation within the tech industry than ever before as both the breadth and the complexity of technology increases. It has gotten to the point that people either can’t keep up or don’t wish to keep up anymore. After all, there is just so much change that people are willing to tolerate. And when someone learns and masters a new skill, they want to reap the return on their investment of time and money vs. immediately throwing more time and money into learning something else. Most people who choose to make technology the foundation for their profession understand that life-long learning is a must. But as mentioned above there is always a limit… whether it be physical, mental or financial, exhaustion will always catch up.

For the consulting industry, this is both a blessing and a curse. “Where there is confusion there is profit… for the wise [person]”… new and unfamiliar tech keeps both demand and rates high. But it is also very easy to become out-of-touch or even obsolete. In Calgary, when the O&G industry turned around a few years back, many IT contractors found themselves out of work or they took lesser level roles to keep working through the economic downturn. When the market began to come back a year-and-a-half to two-years later, there was a surprise that we did not expect. While many people’s professional development went on hold for this time, technological advancement didn’t wane. We discovered that a skills gap had developed… and the skills/experience that employers were wanting, few local people had. It was a scramble for the local market to re-tool, re-educate and come up to speed on these newer technologies.

The lesson (or one of the lessons) in all this, for IT consultants/contractors, is in understanding the importance of the work that you choose. By carefully choosing your next project, one that leverages leading edge application of technology – in an area where you wish to grow and develop – you are able to keep your skills current. Through great projects, you continue to build your resume remaining relevant and highly employable. Given the reality of a growing global skills gap, contractor rates will be strong… as such, I believe that the kind of project, the nature of the work and the technology stack to be leveraged will become even more strategically important to contactors when evaluating and choosing new assignments.

Choosing a Service to Help You Write Your Best Resume

Choosing a Service to Help You Write Your Best Resume

For many people, writing sucks. And, no matter how much you love talking about yourself, writing about yourself in a resume can be a dreadful task. Many entrepreneurial career coaches and writers have capitalized on this over the years by selling their services to write your resume for you. Through these angels, IT contractors have the ability get past that barrier preventing them from applying to an exciting contract position.

Sounds like a dream come true, right? Maybe. While there is no doubt that there are some talented, quality resume-writers out there who will land you a job interview, there are also some brutal, harmful services. Here’s what to look for in a great resume-writer:

  • They charge a decent amount of money. An extremely high price could be a sign you’re being scammed, but if somebody is claiming to write you something for $50, then it’s going to suck. This is your top job searching tool and you need to invest in it.
  • They have a solid process. Look for a professional who has a specific process to write your resume that includes an interview to truly understand your experience. That process should also promote that they will never make-up experience and will talk to you before adding new content.
  • They Know YOUR Industry. IT, especially, is a unique field with specific skills and the person writing your resume has to understand them. They should also understand your specific industry. Contractors working for the Federal Government have a completely different style resume than those working in the banking industry.
  • They personalize your resume. Not necessarily branded with “your colours” but you want a writer with samples demonstrating they do not work from only one template. At Eagle, our recruiters often come across resumes that look the exact same, except for some information within projects. These resumes are often flagged as potential fraud.
  • They focus on careers and resumes. There are extremely talented writers, but are they specifically resume writers? Try to stick with people who are resume-oriented and dedicated to finding you a job, rather than writing anything under the sun.
  • They have credentials. Of course there are certifications for resume-writing, there’s a certification for everything. Learn more about the Certified Professional Resume Writer credential here and decide if this is an important criteria in your search for a writer.

Many job seekers and contractors have different points-of-view regarding professional resume writers. Even if you find the best in the business, you’re still paying a lot of money for something you really could have done on your own. You can find plenty of free templates online and nobody can write about you better than you can… you just need to make the time. In addition, you need to frequently update your resume so you can target specific jobs, so regardless, you’ll have to do some writing anyway.

Some of our contractors recently told us that they’ve had success with services like JobScan. JobScan offers two different products. First, they will scan your resume alongside the description of the job to which you’re applying and provide feedback. The results tell you how well your resume will do in an ATS, which keywords are lacking, what clichés and fluff you need to eliminate, as well as provide tips on which skills you might want to add. JobScan can also look at your LinkedIn profile to give you suggestions on how you can make that more attractive to recruiters. The complete service does have a subscription fee and given its popularity you may want to do a full review to decide if it’s for you.

Do you have any tools or tricks to find the balance between a quality resume and time? If so, we’d love to hear them! Please share your advice in the comments below.

The Growing Problem of Fraudulent Credentials (and the impact on honest consultants!)

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

The Growing Problem of Fraudulent Credentials (and the impact on honest consultants!)

Let me start by saying that the vast majority of contractors and applicants are 100% honest and represent themselves, their work and educational achievements fairly and correctly. That said, there is a growing issue in the labour market of people misrepresenting themselves in order to qualify for open postings. This may have been the case for years and it flew under the radar; however, with new vetting techniques and technology it is getting caught more and more often. Also, as more companies are being burned by fraudulent activity, they are both demanding and completing deeper vetting of candidates.

Misrepresentation takes multiple forms, from small embellishments and mis-matched dates covering small gaps in work experience, to much more nefarious activities. Some of the more brazen attempts to mislead potential employers include:

  • Presenting completely falsified resumes: This can be done as an individual doctoring their own resume, or there are “resume banks” available to people who pay to use them. This can include education or work experience falsification, but sometimes the entire resume is completely fabricated.
  • References are often faked: Friends, family or even themselves as the person who answers the phone number of the given reference.
  • Stand-ins for phone interviews (or even Skype interviews!!): Whereby someone with the actual knowledge completes the technical job interview on the fraudster’s behalf. The unwitting company hires and doesn’t realize that there was a change until they show up on the first day of work. If the company is complex enough, the people conducting the interview may not even be the same people who meet the new hire on the first day. Pretty brazen of them to try this!

It is unclear what people are trying to accomplish by faking their way into a job in these ways. It will catch up with them. They aren’t truly qualified to complete the work and they will be terminated, if not for the fraud then for incompetence. However, there are desperate people and if they can fake their way to earning even a few weeks’ pay before being found out then they move on to their next “victim”. It is too time-consuming and costly to press charges… and they get away with it.

What is the industry doing about this? Well, many companies are completing their own vetting even if they use a recruitment agency to source and qualify candidates. IT is a small industry and if someone says that they worked for XYZ Corp., then there is likely someone at the company that knows someone at the other company who can verify whether the candidate actually did what they said they did. Staffing agencies have been doing this for some time now and it is standard practice in the fight against fraudsters. Another check is simply a comparison against old resumes. Most agencies collect resumes from people over the course of many years – older experience in new resumes must match that found in their older resumes, and also in their LinkedIn profiles. References may not be called at the number given by the applicant, but rather they may be contacted via social media or called at their place of work using the company’s main number, making it much more difficult to arrange to have a “fake-someone” complete the interview. Additionally, there is now new technology (AI) being employed to rate the likelihood that an applicant is falsifying their resumes and there are new 3rd Party vetting services that specialize in deeper dives/forensic reviews and vetting. Most recruitment agencies employ one or more of these companies to ensure experience and education listed are accurate. There are also registries being set up that use blockchain technology to verify the accuracy of the data people share. Applicants will have full control over who receives and sees their private information, and the companies this is shared with will be guaranteed of its accuracy.

What is important for consultants to take away from all this is that the industry is now “awake” to resume/applicant fraud and is taking significant steps to uncover issues prior to hiring. 99%+ of people are honest and don’t need to be concerned; however, even honest people can make mistakes. I encourage anyone reading this to go through their resume with a fine-toothed comb to ensure all is completely accurate. It is so easy to mess something up with changes from one version of the resume to another. You absolutely should adapt your resume to best match the role to which you are applying, but adapting isn’t embellishing.  Even though the content might look different, it should still be in sync with what was presented in older resumes. The chance that even small inconsistencies are caught are very much more likely than it ever was before and these little, seemingly insignificant issues, could cost you a job for which you are applying. In this way, attention to detail is more critical than ever.

Is That Job Too Good to Be True?

Is That Job Too Good to Be True?

 

Scammers’ intelligence is growing exponentially and nobody is safe from their activities. While it’s common to hear about less tech-savvy people losing out, there are also plenty of examples of even the most cautious organizations being caught off-guard. In 2019 alone, multiple Canadian municipalities got stung. The City of Ottawa lost $128K, the City of Burlington was out $503K and Saskatoon lost $1 million!

Scams can have devasting effects, from losing lifesavings to having your entire identity stolen, and they come in multiple forms. As a job seeker, it’s especially important to remain vigilant when applying for jobs, as thieves can steal your personal information and destroy your world before you can blink. There are a number of these types of scams floating around the internet and, while fewer target IT contract job opportunities specifically, it’s still wise to recognize these warning signs:

  • A job posting or email looks extremely unprofessional, with too many errors or using a free email address (ex. Gmail or Yahoo).
  • You get contacted about a job to which you don’t remember ever applying, or even uploading your resume to where the recruiter claims they found it.
  • The recruiter asks for your personal information way too early in the job application process
  • You’re required to pay money up-front just to be considered.
  • The hiring manager offers you the job almost immediately, after just a few emails and a glance at your resume.
  • The job opportunity is too good to be true.

Many of these postings may still be legitimate. Recruiters have creative ways to find resumes of talented people, so it is not uncommon for them to contact you about a job, right out of the blue. It just means they’re impressed by your experience and want to learn more. In other cases, a job opportunity might appear to be unprofessional because the poster is inexperienced or in a rush (a sign that you can bring them value!)

When a job posting has too many red flags or your gut just isn’t feeling right about it, do not apply. But, if you are interested and believe it could be something great, here are some extra steps you can take:

  • Review the LinkedIn profile of the person or company who posted the job to see their experience and connections.
  • Check the URL of the job posting and confirm it is actually with the company the say they are. Look for weird spellings like “Gogle” instead of “Google” or somebody creating false subdomain like “eagleonline.supergreatjobs.co. Just because their logo is visible, it doesn’t make the website real.
  • Go directly to the organization’s website that you know is legitimate by typing in the URL directly or through a Google Search. Review that website to see if the job in question is actually posted and look for a physical address to cross-reference on a map.
  • Pick up the phone or show up at their office to speak to the recruiter directly. It’s too easy to be duped through email or instant messaging.

Canada’s Anti-Fraud Centre provides more information about common job scams, as well as all other types of fraudulent activities. For more information or to report a scam, that is a great place to start. Happy job hunting… be careful out there!