Talent Development Centre

Category Archives: Job Search

All Talent Development Centre posts for Canadian technology contractors relating to job searching.

Please Don’t Ghost Recruiters After Being Submitted to a Client

Please Don't Ghost Recruiters After Being Submitted to a Client

Graeme Bakker By Graeme Bakker,
Director, Delivery Strategy & Development at Eagle

A major part of a successful recruiter/consultant relationship, is building a connection that lasts. Afterall, when a recruiter and consultant are working together, it often takes a couple of opportunities and submissions before a placement occurs.

During this process, many forms of conversation need to happen, via both email and phone. Having been leading recruiters for a number of years now, I commonly hear “I can’t get in touch with Joe,” or “Sarah won’t confirm her interview availability.”  On the flip side, consultants provide feedback like “I never heard back about my submission,” or “Nobody ever called me about a possible interview.”

Contract opportunities often come in fast and close even faster. A major challenge contractors and recruiters have throughout the process is being sure to communicate back-and-forth quickly, as new information becomes available. And after all of that rush, the hiring manager is sometimes slow to review and feedback on submissions seems non-existent.  This causes anxiety for both recruiters and consultants.

Trust me when I say that recruiters LOVE getting feedback from clients about submissions. And there is nothing more that we would love than to let you know that feedback, in detail.  No feedback is as frustrating for everyone.

But a client’s hiring process is not simple and they are also dealing with many unknowns. There might be a delay for any number of reasons beyond their control, meaning it could be another week before the resumes even get to the right hiring manager.  We’ve also seen hold-ups happen because the client wants to hire two people instead of one person for the role and interviews get pushed for another week.  So many things can happen behind the scenes.

Still, it’s understandable that delays, lack of feedback and too many “no update updates” would cause a consultant to disengage with their recruiter. Sometimes this results in contractors “ghosting” their recruiter – completely ignoring emails or phone calls and not responding at all. This, however, can send the wrong message and may have negative effects.

As noted, clients’ hiring processes timelines can vary and be delayed for many reasons. Sometimes, the recruiter only hears something a couple weeks later, when they receive a notice that the client wants to interview the consultant. If you’ve already ghosted them due to a lack of feedback, then the recruiter is going to be forced to tell the client that you are no longer interested, and a new search begins to find somebody else for the job.  Furthermore, it decreases their confidence in considering you for future submissions.

Communication, or lack there-of, is a common reason we see job opportunities fall apart. I recommend working with your recruiter to make a communication plan upfront. Let them know how often and when you prefer updates to be sent (even if there is no update), plus if the recruiter doesn’t offer the information, ask them about how the client works so you can set your own expectations during the process.

Patience is something that both the recruiter and the consultant working together must understand.  Certainly, great recruiters must check-in with job applicants, even if there is no feedback, so the consultant is aware of what may or may not be coming down the pipe. And at the same time, as a consultant, you should trust your recruiter and have confidence that if there is information or feedback, you will receive it.

Dating Advice for your Job Search: 8 things you should NEVER do after a first date (or job interview)

Dating Advice for your Job Search: 8 things you should NEVER do after a first date (or job interview)

You gotta love that feeling after a successful job interview for a gig that you really want. Leaving the meeting knowing that there was a genuine connection, they know that what you’re offering is exactly what they need and you know that their project is exactly what you’ve been looking for. Unfortunately, you’re not the only fish in the sea, so as much as you’d like them to pick you right away, the reality is, they need to look at all their options before making their final decision.

The scenario is like that of a first date, so what better place to get your next steps than a dating professional? The dating website eHarmony published a post outlining what you should never do after a first date and it perfectly aligns with what you should never do after a job interview.

1. Go text crazy

Text, email or phone. A follow-up afterwards to thank them for their time is great, but then leave it alone and wait for your recruiter to get in touch with you. If a week or two goes by without hearing anything, it’s definitely alright to follow-up. Just like dating, ghosting is rude and no ethical recruiter will intentionally do it to you.

2. Over analyze

The past is over and you can’t control it. Rehashing every response you gave and wishing you’d said something else won’t change anything. Some interview advice does recommend that you can clarify in your follow-up email, but aside from that, stressing about it is futile. The only way to know If they liked you is by waiting for the recruiter or client’s response.

3. Add them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, pin to their Pinterest board…

Add them to LinkedIn with a brief thank you message, and you should already be following the company’s social media pages, but it stops there. Most hiring managers and recruiters save their Facebook and Instagram accounts for personal relationships. Stocking them through those networks is slightly creepy and over-stepping a boundary.

4. Tell yourself you’ll be single [or unemployed] forever

A terrible interview is disappointing, especially if it’s one that you really wanted to work out. That said, self-doubt and negative talk about your future is not going to help you move forward. It’s important to keep a positive frame of mind so you can continue with a successful job search.

5. Act like you’re in a relationship

A great interview with a recruiter is fantastic and it is safe start building a business relationship. You will get to know each other better and the recruiter will send you job opportunities as they arise. But, the eHarmony article states that you need to know the difference between ‘dating’ and ‘in a relationship’. If we compare this to your recruitment agency relationship, it’s important to understand that just because they like you and you’re on their radar, it doesn’t guarantee they will have a job for you. That stage of the relationship might take some time to get to.

6. Cut off all contact with other matches

We always encourage IT contractors to build relationships with multiple staffing agencies. As per the previous point, no single recruiter will be able to help you 100% of the time. Even if there’s one you really like, continue to keep in contact with others. When you’re on contract, continue to meet with recruiters to ensure you’re set-up for the next gig. Polygamous relationships are not only socially acceptable in IT contracting, but strongly encouraged.

7. Tell your friends & family you’ve met The One

Recruiters need to present their clients with top candidates who they can guarantee will be available if chosen. After you complete a successful interview, refrain from jumping the gun and telling other recruiters that you’ve got a contract confirmed because that will diminish any chance of them submitting you to other roles. If that job you think you had falls through, you’ll suddenly find yourself with no leads at all.

8. Play games

Recruiters and clients have work to get done and don’t have time for your games. Be upfront in telling them about other opportunities you’re considering if they give you a job offer, be fair and open during rate negotiations, and stick to your commitments. Similarly, lying about other opportunities to try and speed up the process or adjust your rate is also an unethical game that, when discovered, will stop any future opportunities from that recruiter.

The Difference Between a Recruiter and Client Interview

The Difference Between a Recruiter and Client Interview

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Director of Delivery, Strategy and Development at Eagle

I often get questions from consultants asking me, “What’s the difference between my interview with a recruiter and the interview with the client (hiring manager)” or “Why do I need to meet with you if I’m also meeting with the hiring manager?” There is a real difference between the recruiter interview and the hiring manager interview, and they each have their importance. Remember, the recruiter is a third-party individual who is working with the client company to go out into the market and find the best candidates possible for that client company’s position. The hiring manager is someone who actually works directly at the client company seeking to fill the position.

A recruiter is requested to use their searching expertise to go out into the industry and find and qualify the best candidate possible who specifically fit a set of requirements provided by the hiring manager. They’re really focusing in on skills and requirements and the job fit. It’s the hiring manager who will take this candidate from the recruiter and then determine if the candidate’s qualifications are suitable for the open position, the team fit, the company’s culture, the company’s core values, etc.

An interview with the recruiter is important. In this interview they will ask you questions to help them determine if you have the specific skills required for the open position. The recruiter wants to set you up for success in your future role so they are going to look deep into your work experience and try to understand both your strengths and weaknesses. Interviewing with the recruiter is also good practice. As per this SparkHire post, during this interview, the recruiter will also coach you and help you prepare for your interview with the hiring manager. They will provide you with useful tips throughout the hiring process, such as appropriate dress, resume format, and handling gaps in employment. They can also provide advice on when it’s appropriate to ask questions about things such as salary and benefits. Your best bet is to look at your interview and conversations with the recruiter as more of a training advantage and a way to learn inside information on the job and hiring manager beforehand.

During the interview with a hiring manager, the hiring manager will ask you questions to determine if your experience would be beneficial not only to the position but to the company as well. The hiring manager is the person who defined the scope of work, including the tasks and responsibilities, and the requirements of the role. They also have the bigger picture and understand the goals and milestones that go along with this role. The hiring manager has the insight into the company and is more likely to assess your skills to see if your skill set would align to other projects or departments in the company, along with this position. They are also asking the candidate questions to determine the team and culture fit. It is the hiring manager who makes the decision over whether or not to hire the candidate.

Remember, it’s important to create a good relationship with your recruiter. A good recruiter is an added benefit to your job searching. If this particular opportunity didn’t work out and if you’ve made a good impression, the recruiter will work with you on future positions, increasing your options.

Practical Ways for IT Contractors to Use Free Time

Practical Ways for IT Contractors to Use Free Time

The COVID-19 outbreak is locking the world down inside their homes and many of us are already going stir-crazy. Evening extra-curricular activities have been cancelled, live sports are taking a hiatus, and we’re discouraged from going out unless it’s absolutely necessary. Even telecommuting, as convenient as it is, gives you an hour or two more at home… inside the house… bored.

As we noted in last week’s post, it becomes easy to create an unhealthy routine of rolling out of bed, doing your work, then watching Netflix, all while eating junk food throughout the day. That behaviour is acceptable over the Christmas holidays, but is not ideal. Instead, use your extra time to better yourself and plan some of these tasks into your daily routines:

Professional Development

How many times in the past couple years have you missed out on a gig or higher rate because you were lacking some specific training or certification. Did you tell yourself you’re going to get on it but life is too busy? Now is the time! There are plenty of ways you can expand your skills and learn right from your home. We recently updated this post that contains over 50 different online resources for building skills and earning certifications. Included in that list is ICTC’s newly launched ICTC Ditital Pulse Channel. It will include live virtual events via video conference and available on their Vimeo page.

Perhaps you just need to use some existing skills and develop tangible experience. In that case, try creating  a few made-up projects, similar to this video of Python projects that look good on a resume. Or, you can offer to help a friend or past client with a project at no charge, with the understanding that you are learning a new skill.

Update Your Resume

We see thousands of resumes. Few of them are perfect. Can yours use some polishing? Here’s a checklist of things worth reviewing:

  1. Experience: Review it and ensure you list all technologies and skills you used, in each project description. If you know you will be responding to public sector bids in the future, check out this past post about building a resume for a government matrix. Remember, when you’re in a crunch to get a resume to a recruiter, it will be easier to cut information out of a detailed resume than to write new information to put into it.
  2. Wording: You have the meat, now make sure you’re selling yourself! Check out this post that helps you write the perfect profile summary. It will hook a recruiter into wanting to read more of your resume, then you can sell them on your experience. This infographic contains powerful action verbs to incorporate into project descriptions.
  3. Formatting: It’s amazing how many great resumes are destroyed because the formatting is awful. The biggest letdown is when a candidate gets too fancy and designs a beautiful resume that staffing agencies’ Applicant Tracking Systems can’t read. Then all that work becomes pointless. Even when it gets through the system, some IT contractors still fail to catch a recruiter’s attention. A few years ago, we asked recruiters what IT contractors can do better when formatting their resume, here’s their responses. Does your resume have any of these mishaps? If you’re spicing up your resume, also check out the video series we did a few years ago that gives tips for formatting your resume in MS Word.
  4. Match it to LinkedIn: It is no secret that all recruiters leverage LinkedIn to build their network. You need to have an updated profile to be found by the industry’s top recruiters. You also need to confirm it matches your resume which is one of the top things recruiters look for in a great LinkedIn profile. Use your downtime to update your LinkedIn profile, complete with a great profile photo.

Organize Your Business

Keeping your business running smoothly requires extra time to organize, and frankly, few IT contractors have time for that… until now! Here are a few past posts that will help:

Take Care of Yourself

If all else fails and you don’t want to think about work, use your time to take care of yourself.

  • Add Exercise into Your Daily Routine. It can be as simple as a few push-ups and crunches throughout the day, taking a walk around the block during your lunch break, or finding online workouts to follow along with. Many gyms are offering free live sessions to help cope with quarantines, you just need to search for them.
  • Practice Mindfulness. Especially during uncertain times where stress and anxiety are high, this is a good opportunity learn more about mindfulness. Explore and practice meditation in a quiet area to help focus your attention on the present moment and accept it without judgement. Some forms of yoga can have similar results, and also accomplish that exercise goal!
  • Enjoy Time with Others. Enjoy board games and activities with kids and spouses. Then, when fights inevitably break-out, call old friends and relatives who you’ve lost touch with.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a challenging time for the world and it’s a test for all of us. How we react and move forward will determine who will come out on top when this is all over. These are just a few ways you can take advantage of your downtime to better yourself. What else are you doing to keep busy while stuck at home?

Dating Advice for your Job Search: 7 signs your first date (or job interview) is going great

Dating Advice for your Job Search: 7 signs your first date (or job interview) is going great

Job search advice has been researched and hashed out by experts around the world, and if there’s any topic more popular on the internet, it’s dating. The two have plenty of parallels so to give you a different perspective on your job search, we’ve found expert dating tips and applied them to make your career thrive.

In this post, we’re looking at a first date article from the dating website Plenty of Fish. It gives the sure-fire signs that a date is going well. These can easily be applied to your job interview. Knowing an interview is going well gives you momentum. You’re encouraged to keep putting effort into your responses, it makes you more positive, and the connection with your interviewer grows. In contrast, when you spot an interview is tanking, you know not get your hopes up and you’re driven to keep searching for your next gig as soon as you get home.

If you’re ever doubting yourself during an interview (which we all do), here’s some tangible evidence that everything’s going a-ok… based on advice from a first date:

Genuine Face Time

Eye contact, nodding and smiling are all good signs that the recruiter or hiring manager are interested in what you’re saying and engaged in conversation. Vice-versa, you want to be doing the same and let your body language display that you care about the IT contract. If the person you meet with is distracted by their phone or checking their watch, it might be time to kiss this job opportunity goodbye.

The Conversation Flows, Easily

Conversation happens naturally when there’s a real connection. You and your interviewer will have a great back-and-forth discussion about your experience and their project, plus you might even crack a few jokes. Unlike dating, lack of connection doesn’t represent a lack of future. Being liked by your recruiter, however, does give you a leg-up on your competition.

They Make You Laugh

As already mentioned, joking together is a sign of a good connection. For this point, though, let’s look at laughing from a broader perspective and consider that the interview makes you feel happy and excited about what’s going on. Similar to when you hear a good joke, if what you’re hearing in this interview gives you a positive feeling, makes you smile, and you genuinely want to hear more, then it’s safe to say you’re on the right track.

You Have Things in Common

Not necessarily with the interviewer (although it’s a nice-to-have) but as the interview moves along, you’ll know things are going well if your goals and skills align with the projects and opportunities available with the client. Perhaps you’ll even find that your unique skillset matches exactly what they need for their newest innovation.

You Get the Feeling They’re a Good Person

After meeting with the recruiter and hiring manager, and getting to know them and their company, you can confirm that you’re in the right place. You know from the conversation that both the individuals and the companies they represent (the client and/or staffing agency) are they types of people you want to do business with.

No One Pulls the “Something-Suddenly-Came-Up” Move

A bit of a harsh move for a first date, but practical and understandable in business. Time is valuable so if a hiring manager realizes early in the interview that things won’t work out, they might end it and send you on your way. Make no mistake, this is no subtle sign. The interview did not go great and it’s time to keep looking.

The Long Kiss Goodnight

We can’t speak for all recruitment agencies, but at Eagle, there will not be a kiss… regardless of how great your interview was. If the interview went great, though, you might get a long conversation at the door, a request to see them again sometime soon, and even a follow-up text the next day!

Dating Advice for Your Job Search: How to Have a Great First Date (or Job Interview)

Dating Advice for Your Job Search: How to Have a Great First Date (or Job Interview)

A few years ago, we shared a post with general dating advice and compared it to your job search. As we noted then, “Finding a recruiter, building your relationship and working to get a job through them can be a long, complicated, some-what awkward and sometimes painful experience… not too different from dating.” The advice followed the entire job search/dating process. Let’s look at a more specific stage and dive into how to make your first meeting successful, using this Readers Digest “First Date” article as a guideline. They summarized 9 secrets for a perfect first date that can all be applied to that first interview with either a recruiter or a client.

1. Reassess Your Expectations

Be sure you’re realistic going in and understand what can or cannot come out of this interview. Is the recruiter just meeting you to understand your experience, or is there a specific job already available? Are you one of the only contractors the client interviewing and the job’s a sure-thing, or is this just the start of a long competition?

2. Dress to Impress

While many workplaces and clients’ sites are leaning towards a more casual culture, dressing to impress your job interviewer never goes out of style. That’s not to say you must wear a suit and tie. Jeans and a nice shirt can look professional and appropriate, but they can also make you look like a slob. Choose a new, clean pair of jeans and a collared shirt with a neutral design and no words or logos.

3. Pick a Safe and Comfortable Environment

If there’s a chance your interview environment isn’t going to be safe, you might want to reconsider this job opportunity all together. But, there is still some job interview validity to this piece of dating advice. Often times, the first meeting with a recruiter will be over a casual coffee and they will let you choose a location. Select a venue that is comfortable, close and not loud to ensure a great conversation.

4. Be Courteous

We can take Reader’s Digest’s dating advice on this point almost word-for-word for job interviews: Manners say a lot about a person. Punctuality is essential, so if you are running late, give your [Interviewer] a call to let him [or her} know. During the [interview], keep your cellphone on silent mode and answer only urgent calls. Most importantly, say “please” and “thank you.”

5. Keep the Conversation Light

Your first interview is rarely the time to get into nitty gritty details and bargain for rate. Focus on understanding each other, giving the interviewer the best impression of who you are and what you can do. Don’t forget, a conversation goes two ways. Listen actively and ask follow-up questions to guarantee you fully understand the opportunity, the client and hiring process.

6. Split the Costs on a First Date…But Offer to Pay if You Made the Invitation

There shouldn’t be any costs to your first date except for maybe coffee, in which case sure, split it or offer to pay. You might also incur costs like parking or transportation. Unless there are extraordinary circumstances or a previous agreement, you will eat these costs. Handing your interviewer a receipt to reimburse half of your Uber is unlikely to create the ideal first impression.

7. Make Your Intentions Clear from The Start

IT contractors enjoy flexibility in where they work, when they work and for whom they work, but they also need to respect their client. When you plan to work from your home office, take a specific vacation, or juggle multiple contracts, be up-front about your intentions. If it is a major issue (which it rarely is), you can end the interview and both move-on. Otherwise, it prevents surprises and tricky conversations down the road.

8. Smile and Have a Good Time

In this section, Reader’s Digest says, “A date is supposed to be more fun than a job interview.” Ouch! Job interviews should be human and real. While we don’t recommend cracking jokes and telling stories about your college days, you can smile, laugh a little, and leave your mark as a positive person.

9. Remember, There Are Plenty of Fish In The Sea

You might realize part way through the job interview that it simply isn’t for you. Maybe it’s in the wrong part of town, your skillset doesn’t match the requirements, or you’ve had a bad experience with the client. No problem! End the interview early to avoid wasting anyone’s time and keep on moving.

Preparing for an Interview? Use this Worksheet.

Prepping for an Interview? Use this Worksheet.

Brianne Risley By Brianne Risley,
Director, Delivery Strategy & Development at Eagle

Have you ever walked out of an interview knowing you nailed it? Has the reverse also happened where you agonized over your responses hours, or even days later, wishing you had answered a question differently?

How you prepare for your interview can make or break your important meeting.

I created the worksheet below to accomplish two things: To cement your personal brand, and to help you pull out as much detail as possible on recent roles to answer any interview question with textured, specific, and fulsome answers. The detail you provide in your responses can move your interview from ‘good’ to ‘great’ in the eyes of a hiring manager, and can really help with your poise and confidence during the meeting.

You owe it to yourself to make your next interview as painless as possible. Try this framework out; I’m confident it will make a difference. You are about to really impress a hiring manager!

Step One: Fill out the worksheet 2-3 days prior to your interview. You will prepare detail for your most recent 3 contracts, or last 5 years of work experience – whichever you deem to be the best overview of your experience.

Step Two: Use all the detail you organized to answer sample interview questions using the STAR interview technique (more details below). Remember, most candidates struggle to provide specific examples of their experience during an interview. After taking the time to layout your recent experience in the worksheet, your answers will flow.

Interview Prep Worksheet

PART I: Your Personal Brand/”Tell Me About Yourself”

Here you will perfect your 30-second ‘elevator pitch’ and your brand/value proposition for a client. Every interview, (and every dinner party!) starts with some form of this question. Determine what yours is and you can add it to your header on Linkedin.

  • What I am:
  • What I’m great at:
  • Who I help:
  • What I want:

“I am a career Business Analyst with a passion for helping business teams re-imagine their legacy applications into the cloud. I’m looking forward to hearing more about your project and sharing how I can help.”

PART II: Detailed Experience Worksheet

Complete this for your most recent 3 contracts, or last 5 years of work experience – whichever you deem to be the best overview of your experience.

  • What is the nature of the project that you were working on? (Why was it needed by the business?)
  • Describe your responsibilities/breakdown your day. How much time do you spend on what activities each week(%)?
  • What size team are you working with? (your internal team, vendors, roles, size of user-base)
  • Who were you liaising with (business units? other developers? vendors?)
  • What major challenges did you encounter on the project? What was your role in handling the challenge?
  • What successes (small/large) did you achieve?
  • What tools/technology did you use in your role or were present in the technology environment? (versions?)
  • What was the Result? (specifics around how you made money, saved money, or changed a business process that did both)
  • Lessons learned?

PART III: STAR Interview Technique

Reference your worksheet to provide detailed answers to interview questions using the STAR interview format:

  • Situation:The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself.
  • Task:The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation.
  • Action:What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what were the alternatives.
  • Results:What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives. What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?

PART IV: Sample Interview Questions

These are the top 5 most common interview questions for you to practice against.

  1. What is your greatest accomplishment to date and can you relate that to the job you are applying to?
  2. What drives you, personally and professionally? What are you passionate about?
  3. How would you deal with an underperforming team member that you are responsible for?
  4. Tell me of a time when things did not go as planned that you had to deal with a very upset person. What happened? Why? What did you do?
  5. What are you looking for? Describe the ideal job description for you.

Soft Skills Are More Important Than Ever When It Comes To Landing A Gig

Soft Skills Are More Important Than Ever When It Comes To Landing A Gig

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

With labour supply shortages becoming ubiquitous (in the local business market, provincially, nationally and around the world), forward-thinking companies with means are changing up the hiring strategies used even for technical roles… and especially for new, emerging, hard-to-find skills. When the world was in a “buyer’s market”, employers could ask for a shopping-list of attributes and, with a little patience, they could expect to hire close to an exact version of their “perfect candidate”. This is no longer true and hasn’t been true for some time now… and companies are coming around to the idea.

Progressive companies are more and more often hiring people using criteria that includes some basic level of education/experience along with a number of specific, highly valued, non-technical characteristics. We’re basically talking attitude, aptitude and business/people skills. These companies expect to train new hires to be able to do the jobs for which they are hiring. In this way, they are acquiring smart, motivated employees and investing in them to get them to where they need to be technically. The following chart from recent CompTIA research shows that only 3 of the 9 most desired skills are directly technology related.

CompTIA - Skills IT Managers are Looking for When Hiring

One such example of a company looking to invest in training, is AT&T. It has dog-eared $1 billion to re-train their staff to bring their skills sets up to what is needed by the company. Although this appears to be an enormous sum of money, they’ve calculated that it is cheaper to train than to release and (hopefully) re-hire people with the desired technical skill sets. The cost of releasing and then re-hiring is over 20% of the employees’ yearly salaries; and AT&T found that retraining staff has a smaller impact on the actual day-to-day business, they get to keep valuable knowledge-capital in the business, and there is significant improvements in employee engagement, satisfaction and retention.

For independent contractors this message should solidify a couple of things for you:

1) If you are a SME in a particular area and you are able to keep yourself on the leading edge of technological developments, the world is likely to be your oyster. You will be somewhat of a scarce resource and highly coveted.

2) If you find yourself with older, somewhat out-of-date skill sets you might try to emphasize the business/communication skills that you have built or the transferable skills that you are bringing with you. Through an understanding of the role for which you are applying, bring out these soft skills showing how they will help you to become the resource they need. With CRA rules being what they are, you may need to consider taking a permanent role so that the company can invest in your training.

Or… You can invest in yourself, upgrading your skills to better align with the business. But any way you approach it, know that hiring managers are more and more interested in the soft skills applicants bring with them. The following is a list (not exhaustive) of the soft skills employers find valuable. I encourage you to work some of this into your resume and interview conversations!

Soft Skills Employers Look for in People
Source: TIQ Group – Soft Skills Employers Look For In People

These Weekend Python Projects Look Impressive on a Resume

Are you a new developer looking for Python jobs but need to bulk up your resume? Often, especially if you still haven’t built much work experience, creating projects and including them with your application helps showcase your programming experience, as well as your general computer science knowledge. This Tech With Tim video provides examples of two impressive Python projects that he says you can finish in a weekend: a Sudoku Solver and a path finder.

Outside-the-Box Job Interview Tips

Getting called in for a job interview is a good sign. It means your qualifications on paper are strong enough that a recruiter or client believes you’re worth meeting in-person. You’ve already beaten out dozens, possibly hundreds, of other applicants and now your job is to prove to your interviewer that you’re also better than the other applicants they’re meeting.

Strong answers and good technical knowledge about the project are going to help you succeed in the job interview, but let’s face it, any good IT job candidate will do the same. You need some unique strategies to set yourself apart, and this infographic we found from Forbes might be your ticket. They recommend ideas that few job seekers follow-through on:

  1. Go Beyond the Homepage
  2. Use Google Alerts
  3. Aim for 10:30am Tuesday
  4. Craft your Story Statement
  5. Wear a Fashion Statement

All of the details are below and, while doing all of them still won’t guarantee your job interview success, they will definitely help you stand out in the crowd.

Good luck!

Outside-the-Box Job Interview Tips