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Category Archives: Tech Trends

The latest trends in technology and innovations that will benefit Canadian technology professionals by understanding upcoming demands to improve their chances of getting a job.

The 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors Has Been Updated

The 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors Has Been Updated

The Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is used by professionals around the world to identify the most widespread and critical weaknesses that are known to cause serious vulnerabilities in software. According to Howard Solomon at IT World Canada, the list hasn’t been updated in eight years, but it recently used a new data-driven approach based on real-world vulnerabilities reported by security researchers to refresh the 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors list.

Explaining its methodology in more detail, the CWE website says they obtained data about vulnerabilities and exposures from the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) and then developed a scoring formula to calculate a rank order of weaknesses.

The complete list of 25 most dangerous software errors is listed below, including the overall score of each as well as its ID, which is linked to more information about the error on the CWE website.

  1. CWE-119: Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer
    Score: 75.56
  2. CWE-79: Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation (‘Cross-site Scripting’)
    Score: 45.69
  3. CWE-20: Improper Input Validation
    Score: 43.61
  4. CWE-200: Information Exposure
    Score: 32.12
  5. CWE-125: Out-of-bounds Read
    Score: 26.53
  6. CWE-89: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an SQL Command (‘SQL Injection’)
    Score: 24.54
  7. CWE-416: Use After Free
    Score: 17.94
  8. CWE-190: Integer Overflow or Wraparound
    Score: 17.35
  9. CWE-352: Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)
    Score: 15.54
  10. CWE-22: Improper Limitation of a Pathname to a Restricted Directory (‘Path Traversal’)
    Score: 14.10
  11. CWE-78: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an OS Command (‘OS Command Injection’)
    Score: 11.47
  12. CWE-787: Out-of-bounds Write
    Score: 11.08
  13. CWE-287: Improper Authentication
    Score: 10.78
  14. CWE-476: NULL Pointer Dereference
    Score: 9.74
  15. CWE-732: Incorrect Permission Assignment for Critical Resource
    Score: 6.33
  16. CWE-434: Unrestricted Upload of File with Dangerous Type
    Score: 5.50
  17. CWE-611: Improper Restriction of XML External Entity Reference
    Score: 5.48
  18. CWE-94: Improper Control of Generation of Code (‘Code Injection’)
    Score: 5.36
  19. CWE-798: Use of Hard-coded Credentials
    Score: 5.12
  20. CWE-400: Uncontrolled Resource Consumption: 5.04
  21. CWE-772: Missing Release of Resource after Effective Lifetime
    Score: 5.04
  22. CWE-426: Untrusted Search Path
    Score: 4.40
  23. CWE-502: Deserialization of Untrusted Data
    Score: 4.30
  24. CWE-269: Improper Privilege Management
    Score: 4.23
  25. CWE-295: Improper Certificate Validation
    Score: 4.06

How are Canadians Staying Connected?

Canadians are inundated with technologies and distractions. We have the world at our fingertips and can connect with anybody in a matter of seconds. That has a tremendous impact on our lives. We can apply to multiple jobs within a single day, attend interviews from the comfort of our homes, and work on IT projects for clients in a completely different city. Not just that, but we have the opportunity to maintain relationships with friends and family who, just 20 years ago, we might have drifted apart from forever.

Like all positive factors, there are some negatives to go with it. Although it’s easier to connect with people, studies show that in-person relationships suffer because we’re too focused about what’s happening online. Furthermore, excess social media can affect our mental health and staying connected on our phones 24/7 destroys productivity.

How serious is the impact of staying connected to Canadians? StatsCanada looked into it and recently published this infographic. While some numbers are stunning and are a cause for concern, others are no surprise and a sign of the times. It is interesting to see that many Canadians are aware and making an effort to decrease the time they spend on the Internet.

Infographic: How Are Canadians Staying Connected?

Design Trends We Will See in 2020

Last year we shared an infographic that highlighted all of the upcoming 2019 web design trends. As predicted, the trends were a hit and we’re back again to keep you updated with the upcoming 2020 design trends to look for.

2020 is all about immersive virtual reality panormas, zero-gravity layouts, surreal product photography, and vivid, futuristic colors. While you might not have first-hand interaction with the design elements, being familiar with them is advantageous. Not only are you expanding your horizon but you can also chime in with your thoughts on design when it comes time. You’ll sound knowledgeable and might even impress a few with your futuristic outlook from the 2020 design trends.

View the full list of predictions for 2020 design trends from Coastal Creative in the colorful infographic below.

Infographic - Design Trends for 2020

Use These Easy Guidelines to Significantly Improve Your Website Design

Having a personal website can be incredibly useful for your career. However, it can be easy for a website to go astray and not have the professional effect you want. Here is a simple set of tips and tricks you can follow that will  let your website shine.

Top Trick: Show Somebody

This is “skipping to the end” in a sense, as this truly is the greatest trick you can employ.

Show somebody you confide in your website and get their feedback.

A confidant will provide you with the most comprehensive insight. When you watch as an avatar for your future employer or client browses your site and asks questions, it will reveal to you all the flaws.

Find someone you respect in a similar industry, hand them a laptop with your site loaded, brace yourself, and take notes.

Ask yourself: What is the purpose of your site?

Why do you have a website? What do you want to accomplish with it?

These seem like a lot of questions but having a solid grasp of your “why” can help with “what”.

Do you want to become a thought leader in your industry? If that is the case, you’ll want to showcase your case studies or articles to prove your authority. Do you want new work contracts? Ensure your service offering is clear, and you have examples of your work.

Knowing what outcomes you want from the site, will help you prioritize the right elements from page to page.

Ask Yourself: Who do I want to reach with my site?

Similar to purpose, you must understand your target audience. How do I want to address them?

Your target audience will also impact the “What” of the site if you put yourself in that position and walk through what would be most important to them.

Get Inspired

There’s no need to go this alone! There are very successful websites in your industry, and they have spent a lot of time testing and refining. Find some excellent examples of your contemporaries and learn from them!

You’ll do yourself no favors by doing an exact copy, but with some research into your industry, you’ll be able to see some trends and ideas that will benefit you on your site.

Template vs. Custom Design

If the site has all the bells and whistles, then you’ll end up spending a lot of time polishing bells and tuning whistles. Prioritize solid foundations.

Again, who are you targeting, and what do they care about?

If the site is a repository for your information, the only thing that matters is easy navigation and a fast load time. Consider a hosted service like SquareSpace or Wix.

If you’re a developer, being able to point to a beautiful and well-built site may be a plus.

It’s important to remember here that the site should serve you and your purpose. You don’t want to be bogged down with issues that detract from your job/client hunting, so choose your design wisely.

Mobile Friendly

There are lots of variations and options to choose from when designing a site, but these days there is one non-negotiable factor: Mobile Friendly.

There is a good chance someone will access your site on their phone. Your website must look great and be easy to navigate on a mobile device.

Stick to Known Conventions

It can be fun and exciting to try unique and innovative layouts for your website.  However, it is a misplaced effort if it doesn’t serve your purpose.

We can lean on learned conventions. This is what people have come to expect on websites:

  • Logo or name top left or top center, links to the homepage
  • Main navigation top right or top center
  • Contact in the menu as the last item
  • Social media links in the header or footer

Using known conventions may be a bit boring, but it can make your life and the life of your viewer easier.

Use the Right Images for Your Target Audience

The human brain can process images up to 60,000 times faster than words. It’s a powerful tool for us to use to convey to our visitors that they’re in the right place.

Thankfully, there are amazing sites with exceptional high-quality free photos. Here are some sources to check out:

Let Everything Breath

There will always be a desire to fit in as much information as possible into any given space. However, this can be counterproductive.

Reducing content and adding blank space around elements allows the reader to effortlessly digest and transition between pieces of information. It produces an orderly and pleasant reading experience that will convey much more.

Only Use Two Fonts

We’ve touched on a principle of “less is more” a couple of times already and this remains true with fonts.

Use no more than two fonts on your website.

To find fonts that coordinate well together, check out the following free sites:

Use Headers Wisely

Headers (H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6) need to be meaningfully different from the body text, and one another. Deploy them wisely to help guide your reader and some bonus SEO boosts.

Think about the Headers like the sections and subsections in a piece. You would organize your content on a page like this:

<h1>Title Here – Only One of These Per Page</h1>

<h2>A Sub Title</h2>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h2>A Sub Title</h2>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h3>Point One</h3>

Consider the suggestions below as a starting point to apply the differences in the font sizes:

P 16px 1x
H1 40px 2.5x
H2 32px 2x
H3 28px 1.75x
H4 24px 1.25x
H5 20px 1.25
H6 16px 1x

Limit the Colors

It can be fun to play with colours within a design or a website. Keep in mind that just like fonts, things can go wrong fast and have a detrimental effect.

The benefit of limiting colors is that it makes it easy to guide the user with an eye-catching pop of color. Imagine a page that is primarily grey and white with a bright orange button. Where do you think the eye would go?

Each color has emotions tied to them. Even the range of colors can elicit a response. What emotions do you want to convey? Consider using the corresponding colors as per this image from UserTestingBlog.

Use These Easy Guidelines to Significantly Improve Your Website Design

Check out the following sites to help you settle on a palette that is cohesive and conforms to colour theory:

Make Your Website Yours

Follow these guidelines and you’re sure to have a professional website that helps achieve your goals.  Regardless of the platform or style you choose, your audience will appreciate if you stick to the foundations listed above.

Cheers to your great looking website!

About the Author

Trevor Alexander has been a professional designer for 15 years, including being part of 3 successfully sold start ups. He now puts together resources and courses to show how ANYONE can produce better looking Presentations, Documents, Reports, and Images by following practical and repeatable strategies. He firmly believes that Virtual Assistants, Marketers, Developers, Business Owners…Everyone, CAN improve the design of their work. Check out his site at https://justenough.design/

How AI Will Transform Our Economy by 2030

As artificial intelligence (AI) continues to take the world by storm and blow our minds every day with new innovations, analysts and experts continue to wrap their minds around where our world will be by the end of the next decade. Combined, there are no doubt thousands of books, articles, TED Talks and videos committed to making those predictions.

Noodle.ai is an Enterprise AI company focusing on supply chain and manufacturing. They recently created an infographic bringing together a number of sources, including McKinsey, PWC, Bloomberg and more to summarize experts’ opinions about artificial intelligence by 2030.

The findings are exciting and not surprising. They show that by 2030, AI could bring $13 trillion to the global economy, with 70% of companies taking advantage of it. To answer the question on most people’s minds — will AI steal all of our jobs — the infographic does say that current occupations will be automated and possibly eliminated, but it also believes that 250 to 280 million jobs could be created! Repetitive jobs opportunities will likely decrease and non-repetitive jobs with high digital skills are predicted to rise by 10%. Those who choose to learn the new skills are those who will succeed the most.

Check out all the details, including three steps to ensure your (or your client’s) business is ready to capitalize on AI in the next 10 years.

How AI Will Transform Our Economy by 2030

Top iOS Mobile App Developments Trends for 2020

iPhone
Photo by Koby Kelsey on Unsplash

From the dawn of its creation, the iOS mobile development platform has provided versatile and powerful options for creating stunning apps. One of the reasons for its permanent thriving is the continuous state of flux that encompasses all the latest trends in mobile app development. New iPhones are out on the market each year, including improved hardware that sets the base for innovative mobile app development, year by year. To avoid lagging behind, mobile app development companies must stay on track with the new advancements and find their place in the platform, too. If you are interested in keeping abreast of the latest mobile design trends, here are a few pointers to focus on as we are moving into the year ahead.

UI Design Trends

Each iOS app development project starts with the basic goal to improve user satisfaction, which inherently makes new progress all about UI or the user interface. The user interface must not only improve in appearance but also provide a new level of satisfaction with feature simplicity and information delivery. This is not so simple as Apple puts iPhones and iPads under the microscope each year to perk up the hardware.

A key trend of feature mobile app development on the iOS platform is leaving this focus on aesthetically pleasing apps behind. That doesn’t mean that iOS apps will no longer be beautiful but it does mean that the ease of access to information and the simplicity of use take the number one place. Therefore, iOS apps must be made from scratch or revamped to help users complete tasks in the shortest possible time.

While we are touching upon aesthetics, the blurred borders of new iPhone screens play a major role in future iOS mobile app development. Designers need to find ways to create apps that work well on older phones with prominent edges and on new seamless iPhone models.

laptop
Photo by Daniel Korpai on Unsplash

iOS Animations and Graphics

Animations are an excellent way to attract users and keep their attention in the flow as they navigate through the app features. Animations enable sleek functionality – an aspect of user experience that users are primarily looking for.

How web browser tabs, for instance, look and shift on a smartphone, as well as other aspects that soften the lines between visual appeal and functionality, are important for keeping users pleased with the product.

3D graphics may be more demanding on behalf of the mobile app development team, but rewarding nevertheless because they provide an extra level of dynamism in transferring information to users, reducing the need for physical prototypes and boosting the visual aspect of products. It is important not to overdo 3D graphics as they can slow down loading times.

Gesture-based Navigation

One of the key trends for 2020 is the placement of navigation elements on your end product. A major design principle of navigation in past mobile app development trends was to place as many buttons in the navigation bar so that users have greater visibility of what is available. As the number of functionalities is growing, this approach doesn’t work anymore because the visual appeal gets lost among all those buttons.

Designers are now focusing on a more hidden, intuitive button design, placing the maximum number of buttons on the home screen without distorting aesthetics. Functionalities are still there but are enmeshed in the gesture-based navigation. Features compressed in this way will improve the user interaction with the app and ultimately boost engagement rates – it makes more sense to create iOS products that support a few key features than making it all about endless app possibilities which will impede the smooth use of the home screen.

If you align these iOS app development trends with the design process of past products in order to update them or use them while creating new ones, clients will ultimately reap benefits that haven’t been so important while ago but are essential as we move forward.

About the Author: Michael Kelley

With a background in journalism, Michael’s passion lies in educating audiences in the realm of tech. He is especially intrigued by the world of app development and all associated facets including Android, iOS, blockchain, andd App technology. Michael has spent the last few years working with app agencies to elevate their content strategy and expand his knowledge even further as app development technologies advance. When he’s not typing away at his computer, you can find Michael traveling the globe or taste-testing pizzas in search of the ultimate pie.

Banking and Technology — Reaching an Inflection Point

Morley Surcon By Morley Surcon,
Vice-President Strategic Accounts & Client Solutions, Western Canada at Eagle

The banking industry today is one of the drivers of innovation in Information Technology in Canada and around the world. Yet, many of the established big banks have legacy systems that threaten to drag them down in the coming tsunami of change. In times of great change and confusion, there are opportunities for the wise consultant.

It wasn’t that long ago that banks were using green-screen technology and were still doing so long after rolling out the first ATMs. They weren’t often thought of as being leading-edge users of newer technology; after all, they needed certainty of operation, maximum uptime, few errors. Bleeding-edge technology was often a bit risky in these respects. Furthermore, the processing that they did need required very large and very expensive (and very consistent/predictable) mainframe computers. They were a large investment that was needed to scale with the banks’ growing businesses. Much of this changed with advent of internet banks who limited the physical requirements of typical brick-n-mortar facilities and offered ubiquitous convenience of anytime, anywhere banking (providing you had access to the internet). These new banks were nimble, technologically-advanced and great marketers. Seemingly all-of-a-sudden, new products, new ways to reach people, and new technology became key differentiators for market disrupting upstarts and innovation became a necessity to the slower-to-change institutional banks.

Number of ICT Workers in CanadaThe big banks’ world was changing and they were being ‘leap-frogged’ by these borderless entities. The change was on! Today, Toronto and Montreal have a large share of the IT talent supply in Canada (45%+ of all talent in Canada) and at least some of this is the result of the strength of demand/needs coming from the strong banking sector. New technology and new ideas are being envisioned, piloted and rolled-out by even the stodgiest of banks. Digital and business transformation, the new paradigm taken up by so many of today’s companies and organizations, is absolutely rampant in the banking industry.

Ok… You’re saying, ‘So tell me something I don’t know’.  Well… How about a short history lesson that might shed some light on what the banking industry may be facing?

For those of us with some grey hair, this situation is quite reminiscent of what happened around the turn of the century in the Telco space. What happened there was that large, ponderous, Regional Bell Operating Companies (to use the old vernacular) had been implementing massive telephone technology systems, incurring huge costs to do so and then amortizing the expense of it all over decades. They had near (or actual) monopolies, long distance calling rates were atrocious, and they had time on their side with little enticement to innovate. Canadian company, Northern Telecom (later Nortel), was a mainstay in the industry, selling their telephony solutions to the world. Then came Internet Protocol (IP)… and the game changed for them and for the RBOC’s, seemingly overnight.

In reality, it wasn’t really all that fast (not by today’s standards) but they were about to be one of the first large industries to learn the lessons that disruptive technology has taught to so many since then. Smaller, more nimble telephone companies began popping up everywhere (CLEC’s – Competitive Local Exchange Carriers) leveraging newer technology that took advantage of high-bandwidth data trunks and new switching technology. Although still expensive, they were able to piggy-back on the networks that the RBOC’s had built (Gov’t regulators demanded the RBOCs allow them to do so). The cost per call was dropping dramatically as a result and data was able to be transmitted in volumes that actually made sense for businesses. The internet had its highways. What came of this was that the well-financed old equipment companies and the quick-and-nimble upstarts were pitted against each other — companies like Nortel coming from the high-reliability world of telecommunications and those like Cisco coming from the world of data-networking. Initially Nortel joked that they’d learn to spell ‘IP’ before Cisco could learn to spell ‘reliability’ and, for the most part, they were able to hold their own. At one-point, Nortel employed over 60,000 people in their research-and-development facility (BNR – Bell Northern Labs) alone. Both sides created great new products. Nortel had age-old client relationships with the telco’s on their side along with excellent quality products, and the likes of Cisco produced innovative and cheaper alternatives. It was the ‘space race’ of the telecommunications industry. Fantastic new products were coming out quicker and quicker… which sounds great …until it wasn’t.

Their customers — the RBOCs and the CLECs — were in a feeding frenzy of buying. It seemed that every 6 months, a better, faster, more progressive solution was coming out. CLECs were leap-frogging the RBOCs to offer better and cheaper service to consumers. Then the RBOCs would leap-frog them back again. The problem for all the players in this industry was that they no longer had time on their side. They didn’t have time to amortize the very high costs of the new technology before the next iteration came out and they were forced to buy/implement/replace or be unable to compete. It was a global race to the bottom and RBOCs and CLECs alike were running out of money — especially the CLECs, many of whom were relatively new business start-ups, part of the dotcom craze. Nortel’s clients couldn’t afford the new gear anymore so Nortel began ‘selling’ their new products and taking equity in these companies as payment. The whole industry and their supply chains became dangerously over-leveraged, a veritable house-of-cards. Then the dotcom bubble burst and most of the CLECs went out of business, dragging the over-leveraged Nortel (and many of their suppliers) down with them.

So, back to the Banking/Finance Industry today. Some of the obvious parallels are the ‘old guard’ who were titans in the industry with wide moats to protect their market share and had relatively little technical innovation for many years. Then come the upstarts, leveraging new technology to change the game. And then the response from the established banks to modernize to be able to compete and, in fact, push on the boundaries of what was possible before. The big banks also have a similar challenge to the Regional Bell Operating Companies, and that is they are somewhat handcuffed by the older, legacy systems that they’d deployed. The new companies don’t have this to worry about. They can move 100% to new technology, whereas the big banks have huge investments tied up in their mainframe technology and, worse, no easy or quick or cheap ways to get off this technology.  As the legacy banks struggle with this piece, the staff that they have managing this infrastructure move dangerously close to retirement — and there are not a lot of Cobol programmers out there ready to step into the vacated roles!

Of course, there are a lot of differences between the Telco and Banking scenarios as well. It has been almost 20 years since the dotcom crash, and everyone has seen lesson after lesson on the disruptive impact technology can have on entire industries, and people are quicker to react to the challenge. And banks are definitely not cash strapped — they have the ability to invest in new technology, in transforming their business, in moving into or out of markets. And, most important to IT experts/contractors, they have the ability to hire many of the best IT people the market has to offer!

Banks, old and new, need to get their technology/business process mix just right. Their continued market success and very survival depends upon it. Innovation = Technology + People. With enough money, the Technology part of this equation is easy… the People part is what is strategically important! As I mentioned earlier, in times of great change and confusion, there are opportunities for the wise consultant.

Disclaimer:

I’m going to pre-acknowledge (before anyone chooses to call me out) that, for the purposes of this blog post, I’ve oversimplified the Telco/Nortel/Cisco/market crash scenario. There were many, many additional factors that played out. However, this is how I remembered it and the lessons that I took away. I worked during those years for Northern Telecom, and a failed CLEC (Norigen), and was part of companies (Anixter and ADNS – Ameritech Data Networking Solutions) building out the data-highways to which I refer in this blog post. I was part of the industry at that time and lived through the ups and downs of it. So, I ask that I be allowed to share my opinion based on what I witnessed directly.

That said, if you have other opinions or experiences of your own and would like to share with our readership… please do so by leaving a comment below!

History’s Most Notable Computers Since the First Personal Computer

Since the first ever personal computer was released back in 1971, manufacturers have continued to release different versions with ranging capabilities. They’ve come in unique shapes and sizes and had some incredible price tags.Thomas Schanz [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)]

As an interesting exercise, 24/7 Wallstreet recently took a look at each year’s most notable computer release since 1971. These computers held an important place in computing history, either because they were the best-selling model or had a significant technological development. You can visit the full article for a detailed trip down memory lane, complete with pictures and descriptions. For the summarized version, here’s the entire list:

1971

  • Notable computer: Kenbak I
  • Price tag: $750
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,659

1972

  • Notable computer: HP 3000
  • Price tag: $95,000
  • Inflation adjusted price: $571,791

1973

  • Notable computer: Wang 2200
  • Price tag: $3,500
  • Inflation adjusted price: $19,832

1974

  • Notable computer: Scelbi-8H
  • Price tag: $440
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,245

1975

  • Notable computer: IBM 5100 Portable Computer
  • Price tag: $8,975
  • Inflation adjusted price: $41,970

1976

  • Notable computer: Apple I
  • Price tag: $667
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,949

1977

  • Notable computer: Apple II
  • Price tag: $1,298
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,389

1978

  • Notable computer: IBM 5110
  • Price tag: $9,875
  • Inflation adjusted price: $38,105

1979

  • Notable computer: Heathkit H-89
  • Price tag: $1,595
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,527

1980

  • Notable computer: Commodore VIC-20
  • Price tag: $299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $913

1981

  • Notable computer: IBM Personal Computer 5150
  • Price tag: $1,565
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,332

1982

  • Notable computer: Commodore 64
  • Price tag: $595
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,551

1983

  • Notable computer: Apple Lisa
  • Price tag: $9,995
  • Inflation adjusted price: $25,247

1984

  • Notable computer: Apple Macintosh
  • Price tag: $2,495
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,042

1985

  • Notable computer: Commodore Amiga 1000
  • Price tag: $1,295
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,028

1986

  • Notable computer: Compaq Portable II
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $8,032

1987

  • Notable computer: Commodore Amiga 500
  • Price tag: $700
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,550

1988

  • Notable computer: NeXT Cube
  • Price tag: $6,500
  • Inflation adjusted price: $13,824

1989

  • Notable computer: Macintosh Portable M5120
  • Price tag: $7,300
  • Inflation adjusted price: $14,811

1990

  • Notable computer: Poqet PC
  • Price tag: $1,995
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,840

1991

  • Notable computer: Apple Macintosh PowerBook
  • Price tag: $2,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,247

1992

  • Notable computer: IBM ThinkPad
  • Price tag: $2,375
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,259

1993

  • Notable computer: Apple Newton MessagePad
  • Price tag: $700
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,219

1995

  • Notable computer: Gateway Solo 2000
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,776

1996

  • Notable computer: Gateway Solo 2100
  • Price tag: $4,149
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,653

1997

  • Notable computer: Dell Dimension XPS H266
  • Price tag: $3,979
  • Inflation adjusted price: $6,237

1998

  • Notable computer: iMac
  • Price tag: $1,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,005

1999

  • Notable computer: Compaq ProSignia Desktop 330
  • Price tag: $2,699
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,076

2000

  • Notable computer: Gateway Performance 1500
  • Price tag: $3,089
  • Inflation adjusted price: $4,513

2001

  • Notable computer: Apple Titanium PowerBook G4
  • Price tag: $3,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $5,049

2002

  • Notable computer: Toshiba Satellite 1955
  • Price tag: $2,499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,495

2003

  • Notable computer: Apple Power Mac G5
  • Price tag: $1,999
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,733

2004

  • Notable computer: Sony VAIO PCV-V200G
  • Price tag: $1,699
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,263

2005

  • Notable computer: Lenovo ThinkPad X41
  • Price tag: $2,249
  • Inflation adjusted price: $2,897

2006

  • Notable computer: Dell XPS M1710
  • Price tag: $2,845
  • Inflation adjusted price: $3,550

2007

  • Notable computer: iPhone 1
  • Price tag: $599
  • Inflation adjusted price: $727

2008

  • Notable computer: MacBook Air
  • Price tag: $1,599
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,868

2009

  • Notable computer: HP 2140 Mini-Note
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $585

2010

  • Notable computer: iPad
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $576

2011

  • Notable computer: Acer Chromebook
  • Price tag: $349
  • Inflation adjusted price: $390

2012

  • Notable computer: Apple iPad (third generation)
  • Price tag: $499
  • Inflation adjusted price: $547

 

2013

  • Notable computer: Toshiba Satellite C55D
  • Price tag: $330
  • Inflation adjusted price: $356

2014

  • Notable computer: Lenovo ThinkPad X240
  • Price tag: $1,555
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,653

2015

  • Notable computer: MacBook
  • Price tag: $1,299
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,379

2016

  • Notable computer: Lenovo Yoga 900S
  • Price tag: $1,099
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,152

2017

  • Notable computer: Google Pixelbook
  • Price tag: $999
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,041

2018

  • Notable computer: Huawei MateBook X Pro
  • Price tag: $1,200
  • Inflation adjusted price: $1,221

It’s 2019. Do You Know Where Your Data Is?

There’s little such thing as privacy in this world. If you use the Internet and access any major technology platform, your data is almost definitely being captured in some form or another. How often do you think about what kind of information is out there and who has access to it?

Unless you’re extremely diligent, you can guarantee that at least one of the major players — Google, Facebook, Apple, Twitter, Amazon or Microsoft — has some data on you. And this infographic from Security Baron tells you what they might have.

Even though the infographic isn’t even a year old yet, it already contains some outdated information (Google+ doesn’t exist anymore). Still, it remains an eye-opener and accurate on most fronts.

The Data Big Tech Companies Have On You - SecurityBaron.com - Infographic
By SecurityBaron.com

How Can Technology Help Us Sleep Better

It’s 2 AM and you’re awake although it’s way past your planned bedtime and you need to be up for work in less than six hours. So, why aren’t you sleeping? The reason is probably that you’re on your smartphone or laptop scrolling down on your social media pages or binge-watching a TV show and you can’t stop. If that, in fact, is the case, you shouldn’t worry. It’s happening to a lot of us really. Just in the last several years, around 60% of young people have admitted to having inadequate sleep.

The first notion that you can get from this is that technology is bad for your sleep, but this is not entirely true. Not all technology affects our sleeping patterns in a negative way. Some studies have actually shown that you can use technology to your own advantage, and that tech can be effectively used to help you sleep better. Here’s how.

Snoring

Around 30% of people in the world frequently experience snoring. While this doesn’t affect them much, it does affect other folks in the household, especially spouses whom they are sharing the bed with.

Since snoring usually occurs when we sleep on our backs, gadgets like Philips SmartSleep Snoring device detect this and encourage the user to change position. Other devices of this kind include the Hüpnos Snoring Mask and the Urgonight EEG Headband.

Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is also quite common and can be caused by weight, enlarged tonsils, smoking, drinking, and some other factors. Around 20% of people worldwide suffer from obstructive sleep apnea.

Programs like SlumberBUMP try to accustom people to sleep on their sides, which solves this problem to a degree. BiPAP machine is very effective at treating patients with sleep apnea, and you also might want to try Theravent EPAP technology.

Insomnia

Insomnia, which is a medical term for having trouble falling asleep, can have many causes, the most common being physical or emotional discomfort, stress, extreme temperatures, light, and depression. Almost every third person complains about having insomnia.

Some medication can help you fall asleep faster, but there is also all kinds of technology that can work to your advantage. Sleepio is a system that detects your sleeping issues and optimizes your sleep routines. If the source of your insomnia is light, try the biological Good Night LED Bulbs that were originally developed for NASA astronauts.

Narcolepsy

While some people can’t get enough sleep, others get too much of it. Narcolepsy is a disorder of excessive sleep, and while it’s not common, it still affects one in every 2,000 Americans. There are different light gadgets that you can use to alleviate the symptoms of narcolepsy, like LED Skylights, Verilux HappyLight Deluxe, and Day-Light Sky.

Nightmares

We all have bad dreams from time to time, and occasionally we get those awful nightmares that scare us so much that we are afraid to fall back to sleep again. Nightmares can be caused by stress, anxiety, trauma, or other factors. While we cannot really control what we dream about, we can still use tech to avoid nightmares from happening.

One thing called the ReScript Treatment seems to be the most effective. It helps patients have greater control over their visual imagery by implementing the creative use of virtual reality. It’s sort of a training program that teaches you how to change what you see in your sleep to a more pleasing image.

Check out a visual of some solutions below and visit the original page for the complete infographic.

Solve Your Sleep Problems with Technology