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Category Archives: Industry Trends and Insight

IT industry trends and insights, including information about the IT job market across Canada, tech news from around the world plus the latest in technology and current opinions.

Regional Job Market Update for Montréal, Québec

David O'Brien By David O’Brien,
Senior Vice President, Business Development at Eagle

Panoramic Photo Montreal city fron Mount RoyalThe Montreal IT job market continues to be one of robust demand anchored by some foundational, more traditional industries that are focused on software development, such as Banking, Telco, Aerospace and Transportation. This is augmented now by “sexy ” new technologies and industries in electronic gaming, digital media and a thriving AI hub. In fact, since 2018, Montreal has experienced the largest economic growth in all of Canada with a nearly 6% increase in job creation between 2016 and 2018, and high tech jobs are leading the way. Montreal is now firmly a top 5 spot for tech employment in Canada and the Conference Board of Canada predicts Montreal’s economic growth of 3% will lead major metropolitan cities in Canada this year. With a lower cost of living than both Toronto and Vancouver, the two biggest tech centres in Canada, Montreal looks to be poised to continue its growth.

A recent highlight in the Montreal job market is that Amazon Canada just opened its first Quebec-based distribution warehouse in Lachine, after the city failed to win the corporate pitch contest for Amazon’s second HQ.

As always, with the good come the unknown and success of the recent past will undoubtedly face headwinds both economically and politically. CN Rail, itself, with labour issues, has drastically reduced the number of IT contractors it uses in Montreal, long a top draw for IT contractors. Furthermore, with a new provincial government settling in, the CAQ has changed a number of immigration policies, especially for students, which was and is often a fast track avenue to bring much needed skills in to the labour market. With fears of recession in the overall Canadian economy as growth slows, certainly many of Montreal national employers will start to feel the pinch and that will no doubt affect those represented in Montreal. The question will become how clients respond. Typically, less than positive economic factors manifest detrimentally in permanent hire while they can be a positive for contract hiring.

In demand roles and technologies for Montreal include developers, both back-end and front-end, and particularly mobile developers with Android/Kotlin experience. .Net developers, as well as Security Analysts, BI Business Analysts and Big Data resources with Hadoop skills are all also expected to have high-demand in the coming months.

The 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors Has Been Updated

The 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors Has Been Updated

The Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is used by professionals around the world to identify the most widespread and critical weaknesses that are known to cause serious vulnerabilities in software. According to Howard Solomon at IT World Canada, the list hasn’t been updated in eight years, but it recently used a new data-driven approach based on real-world vulnerabilities reported by security researchers to refresh the 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors list.

Explaining its methodology in more detail, the CWE website says they obtained data about vulnerabilities and exposures from the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) and then developed a scoring formula to calculate a rank order of weaknesses.

The complete list of 25 most dangerous software errors is listed below, including the overall score of each as well as its ID, which is linked to more information about the error on the CWE website.

  1. CWE-119: Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer
    Score: 75.56
  2. CWE-79: Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation (‘Cross-site Scripting’)
    Score: 45.69
  3. CWE-20: Improper Input Validation
    Score: 43.61
  4. CWE-200: Information Exposure
    Score: 32.12
  5. CWE-125: Out-of-bounds Read
    Score: 26.53
  6. CWE-89: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an SQL Command (‘SQL Injection’)
    Score: 24.54
  7. CWE-416: Use After Free
    Score: 17.94
  8. CWE-190: Integer Overflow or Wraparound
    Score: 17.35
  9. CWE-352: Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)
    Score: 15.54
  10. CWE-22: Improper Limitation of a Pathname to a Restricted Directory (‘Path Traversal’)
    Score: 14.10
  11. CWE-78: Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in an OS Command (‘OS Command Injection’)
    Score: 11.47
  12. CWE-787: Out-of-bounds Write
    Score: 11.08
  13. CWE-287: Improper Authentication
    Score: 10.78
  14. CWE-476: NULL Pointer Dereference
    Score: 9.74
  15. CWE-732: Incorrect Permission Assignment for Critical Resource
    Score: 6.33
  16. CWE-434: Unrestricted Upload of File with Dangerous Type
    Score: 5.50
  17. CWE-611: Improper Restriction of XML External Entity Reference
    Score: 5.48
  18. CWE-94: Improper Control of Generation of Code (‘Code Injection’)
    Score: 5.36
  19. CWE-798: Use of Hard-coded Credentials
    Score: 5.12
  20. CWE-400: Uncontrolled Resource Consumption: 5.04
  21. CWE-772: Missing Release of Resource after Effective Lifetime
    Score: 5.04
  22. CWE-426: Untrusted Search Path
    Score: 4.40
  23. CWE-502: Deserialization of Untrusted Data
    Score: 4.30
  24. CWE-269: Improper Privilege Management
    Score: 4.23
  25. CWE-295: Improper Certificate Validation
    Score: 4.06

IT Industry News for November 2019

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee, Co-Founder of Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on December 2nd, 2019

This is my 30,000-foot look at events in the Tech industry for November 2019. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Novembers …

Five years ago, November 2014 was an exceptionally quiet month on the M&A front with Yahoo logothe largest deal being the merger of two semiconductor companies, Cypress Semiconductor and Spansion to form a $4 billion company; private equity company Carlyle Group paid $700 million for investment bank technology company Dealogic and Yahoo shelled out $640 million for video advertising company BrightRoll.

November 2015 saw Expedia pay $3.9 billion for HomeAway as a vehicle to better compete The apple logo and apple with a bite out of itwith Airbnb.  Zayo Holding Group became the first foreign company to own a Canadian telco after paying $465 million for Allstream.  Other smaller deals saw Apple buy Faceshift, a motion capture company whose technology was used in a Star Wars movie; and Lightspeed POS bought SEOshop, increasing its size as a competitor to Shopify.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro grow its Brazilian presence with the purchase of ACAO; PCM bought Edmonton based services firm Acrodex; Data centre company CentriLogic bought infrastructure company Advanced Knowledge Networks; solution provider Scalar Systems bought another Toronto company, professional services firm Eosensa; and Washington-based New Signature bought Toronto-based Microsoft Partner, Imason.

In November 2016, Broadcom acquired Brocade Communication Systems for $5.9 billion; Adobe purchased multi-channel programmatic video platform TubeMogul for $540 million; IT services and outsourcing provider Wipro Limited bought IT cloud consulting firm Appirio for $500 million; Oracle Corp. announced its plans to acquire DNS solution provider, Dyn Inc.; SoftwareOne acquired and integrated House of Lync; and Avnet completed an acquisition of Hackster.

Two years ago, in November 2017, the big M&A activity for the month saw investment firm Thoma Bravo pay $1.6 billion for Barracuda networks.  McAfee also made an acquisition of Skyhigh Networks and smaller deals saw Talend buy Restlet and Qualys buy Netwatcher.

Last year, November 2018 was a busy month in the M&A space, with lots of action!  The largest deal saw SAP shell out $8 billion for experience management company Qualtrics.  Not far behind was Commscope paying $7.4 billion for telecommunication equipment maker Arris.  Vista Equity partners paid $1.94 billion for cloud software company Apptio; and private equity fund CVC paid $1.8 billion for a global IT and managed services provider, ConvergeOne Holdings.  The final billion-dollar deal saw Blackerry make its largest acquisition, paying $1.4 billion for AI cybersecurity startup Cylance.  In other deals, Thoma Bravo bought security testing vendor Veracode for $950 million; LinkedIn paid $400 million for a surveying startup, Glint; power management company Eaton paid $300 million for Turkish company Ulusoy Elektrik; and Citrix shelled out $200 million for intelligent portal company Sapho.  There were plenty of big name companies out shopping with no price tag named, Accenture bought a German design agency Kolle Rebbe; Apple bought AI company Silk Labs;  HPE bought big data company Bluedata; Oracle bought Talari Networks; Cisco bought networking company Ensoft; Microsoft bought another AI company, startup XOXCO; Red Hat (recently purchased by IBM) bought storage startup NooBaa; VMware bought Kubernotes startup Heptio; Symantec bought a couple of companies, Appthirty and Javelin Networks; and DXC bought a couple of companies TESM and BusinessNow.

Which brings us back to the present …

 November 2019 saw quite a few big dollar deals.  The biggest saw Apollo Global taking TechData private in a deal worth $5.4 billion.  eBay sold its Stubhub subsidiary to Viagogo for $4.05 billion; Xerox is selling its stake in Fuji Xerox such that Fujifilm will own the whole entity at a cost of $2.3 billion; Google paid $2.1 billion for Fitbit ; and Opentext paid $1.4 billion for security company Carbonite.  That is a lot of billion-dollar deals for one month!

DXC logoOther deals saw Proofpoint pay $225 million for threat management company ObserveIT; DXC picked up solution providers, Virtual Clarity and Bluleader; Rackspace bought professional services company Onica, and Mimecast picked up DMARC Analyzer.

One other company in the news was Cognizant, who announced it would be laying off between 10,000 and 12,00 employees.

Economic and jobs news around the world was a little mixed, with signs of things slowing in most countries.  Canada lost jobs in October, despite a big boost in public sector hiring.  The US had decent job numbers, but signs were less positive moving forward.  Of course, less positive, does not mean negative!

Some interesting reports this month, with Canada’s privacy commissioner pointing out that 28 million Canadians were affected by corporate hacks or mismanagement.  Pretty interesting for a country with a population of 37.5 million!  Two separate AI report suggest different impacts on jobs into the future; The Brookings Institute suggesting Higher paid workers will be the most impacted; and Jim Goodnight suggesting it will be the factory floor most impacted.

Eagle logoOne final piece of news and a little plug, as the Global Power 150 list of Women in Staffing was released, with Eagle’s CEO Janis Grantham on the list.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month.  The full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the November 2019 industry news in just about a month’s time.

Walk Fast and Smile

How are Canadians Staying Connected?

Canadians are inundated with technologies and distractions. We have the world at our fingertips and can connect with anybody in a matter of seconds. That has a tremendous impact on our lives. We can apply to multiple jobs within a single day, attend interviews from the comfort of our homes, and work on IT projects for clients in a completely different city. Not just that, but we have the opportunity to maintain relationships with friends and family who, just 20 years ago, we might have drifted apart from forever.

Like all positive factors, there are some negatives to go with it. Although it’s easier to connect with people, studies show that in-person relationships suffer because we’re too focused about what’s happening online. Furthermore, excess social media can affect our mental health and staying connected on our phones 24/7 destroys productivity.

How serious is the impact of staying connected to Canadians? StatsCanada looked into it and recently published this infographic. While some numbers are stunning and are a cause for concern, others are no surprise and a sign of the times. It is interesting to see that many Canadians are aware and making an effort to decrease the time they spend on the Internet.

Infographic: How Are Canadians Staying Connected?

Design Trends We Will See in 2020

Last year we shared an infographic that highlighted all of the upcoming 2019 web design trends. As predicted, the trends were a hit and we’re back again to keep you updated with the upcoming 2020 design trends to look for.

2020 is all about immersive virtual reality panormas, zero-gravity layouts, surreal product photography, and vivid, futuristic colors. While you might not have first-hand interaction with the design elements, being familiar with them is advantageous. Not only are you expanding your horizon but you can also chime in with your thoughts on design when it comes time. You’ll sound knowledgeable and might even impress a few with your futuristic outlook from the 2020 design trends.

View the full list of predictions for 2020 design trends from Coastal Creative in the colorful infographic below.

Infographic - Design Trends for 2020

Use These Easy Guidelines to Significantly Improve Your Website Design

Having a personal website can be incredibly useful for your career. However, it can be easy for a website to go astray and not have the professional effect you want. Here is a simple set of tips and tricks you can follow that will  let your website shine.

Top Trick: Show Somebody

This is “skipping to the end” in a sense, as this truly is the greatest trick you can employ.

Show somebody you confide in your website and get their feedback.

A confidant will provide you with the most comprehensive insight. When you watch as an avatar for your future employer or client browses your site and asks questions, it will reveal to you all the flaws.

Find someone you respect in a similar industry, hand them a laptop with your site loaded, brace yourself, and take notes.

Ask yourself: What is the purpose of your site?

Why do you have a website? What do you want to accomplish with it?

These seem like a lot of questions but having a solid grasp of your “why” can help with “what”.

Do you want to become a thought leader in your industry? If that is the case, you’ll want to showcase your case studies or articles to prove your authority. Do you want new work contracts? Ensure your service offering is clear, and you have examples of your work.

Knowing what outcomes you want from the site, will help you prioritize the right elements from page to page.

Ask Yourself: Who do I want to reach with my site?

Similar to purpose, you must understand your target audience. How do I want to address them?

Your target audience will also impact the “What” of the site if you put yourself in that position and walk through what would be most important to them.

Get Inspired

There’s no need to go this alone! There are very successful websites in your industry, and they have spent a lot of time testing and refining. Find some excellent examples of your contemporaries and learn from them!

You’ll do yourself no favors by doing an exact copy, but with some research into your industry, you’ll be able to see some trends and ideas that will benefit you on your site.

Template vs. Custom Design

If the site has all the bells and whistles, then you’ll end up spending a lot of time polishing bells and tuning whistles. Prioritize solid foundations.

Again, who are you targeting, and what do they care about?

If the site is a repository for your information, the only thing that matters is easy navigation and a fast load time. Consider a hosted service like SquareSpace or Wix.

If you’re a developer, being able to point to a beautiful and well-built site may be a plus.

It’s important to remember here that the site should serve you and your purpose. You don’t want to be bogged down with issues that detract from your job/client hunting, so choose your design wisely.

Mobile Friendly

There are lots of variations and options to choose from when designing a site, but these days there is one non-negotiable factor: Mobile Friendly.

There is a good chance someone will access your site on their phone. Your website must look great and be easy to navigate on a mobile device.

Stick to Known Conventions

It can be fun and exciting to try unique and innovative layouts for your website.  However, it is a misplaced effort if it doesn’t serve your purpose.

We can lean on learned conventions. This is what people have come to expect on websites:

  • Logo or name top left or top center, links to the homepage
  • Main navigation top right or top center
  • Contact in the menu as the last item
  • Social media links in the header or footer

Using known conventions may be a bit boring, but it can make your life and the life of your viewer easier.

Use the Right Images for Your Target Audience

The human brain can process images up to 60,000 times faster than words. It’s a powerful tool for us to use to convey to our visitors that they’re in the right place.

Thankfully, there are amazing sites with exceptional high-quality free photos. Here are some sources to check out:

Let Everything Breath

There will always be a desire to fit in as much information as possible into any given space. However, this can be counterproductive.

Reducing content and adding blank space around elements allows the reader to effortlessly digest and transition between pieces of information. It produces an orderly and pleasant reading experience that will convey much more.

Only Use Two Fonts

We’ve touched on a principle of “less is more” a couple of times already and this remains true with fonts.

Use no more than two fonts on your website.

To find fonts that coordinate well together, check out the following free sites:

Use Headers Wisely

Headers (H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6) need to be meaningfully different from the body text, and one another. Deploy them wisely to help guide your reader and some bonus SEO boosts.

Think about the Headers like the sections and subsections in a piece. You would organize your content on a page like this:

<h1>Title Here – Only One of These Per Page</h1>

<h2>A Sub Title</h2>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h2>A Sub Title</h2>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h3>Point One</h3>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h4>Small Point One</h4>

<h3>Point One</h3>

Consider the suggestions below as a starting point to apply the differences in the font sizes:

P 16px 1x
H1 40px 2.5x
H2 32px 2x
H3 28px 1.75x
H4 24px 1.25x
H5 20px 1.25
H6 16px 1x

Limit the Colors

It can be fun to play with colours within a design or a website. Keep in mind that just like fonts, things can go wrong fast and have a detrimental effect.

The benefit of limiting colors is that it makes it easy to guide the user with an eye-catching pop of color. Imagine a page that is primarily grey and white with a bright orange button. Where do you think the eye would go?

Each color has emotions tied to them. Even the range of colors can elicit a response. What emotions do you want to convey? Consider using the corresponding colors as per this image from UserTestingBlog.

Use These Easy Guidelines to Significantly Improve Your Website Design

Check out the following sites to help you settle on a palette that is cohesive and conforms to colour theory:

Make Your Website Yours

Follow these guidelines and you’re sure to have a professional website that helps achieve your goals.  Regardless of the platform or style you choose, your audience will appreciate if you stick to the foundations listed above.

Cheers to your great looking website!

About the Author

Trevor Alexander has been a professional designer for 15 years, including being part of 3 successfully sold start ups. He now puts together resources and courses to show how ANYONE can produce better looking Presentations, Documents, Reports, and Images by following practical and repeatable strategies. He firmly believes that Virtual Assistants, Marketers, Developers, Business Owners…Everyone, CAN improve the design of their work. Check out his site at https://justenough.design/

Tech Professionals Aren’t Excited for Disney+

Disney has been the talk of the town as their streaming service officially launched last. With all of the hype over the course of October, we were curious to know if IT consultants who visit the Talent Development Centre were as excited for this as the media seems to be… and the answer is an obvious “no”. While a small percentage of respondents said they will subscribe to Disney+, most said it’s either not for them or they’re not sure yet.

Have you checked out Disney+ yet?

Tech Professionals Aren't Excited for Disney+

Regional Job Market Update for British Columbia (November 2019)

Cameron McCallum By Cameron McCallum,
Regional Vice President at Eagle
Downtown Vancouver Sunset
Downtown Vancouver Sunset” by Magnus Larsson is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

According to Central1, the BC economy continues to be one of the strongest in Canada and a couple of key indicators were quite positive in October. Employment numbers were up 0.6% which represents 15,300 persons or nearly 2.57 million persons seasonally adjusted. Most of this uptick came from the Vancouver Metropolitan Area (28,000 persons) and the news wasn’t so positive in other parts of the province where the natural resources, goods producing and manufacturing sectors all showed weakness. Interestingly, real estate sales in the lower mainland which had showed signs of weakening after government-introduced impediments is showing signs of a rebound, and MLS sales climbed for the 7th time in the past 8th months. BC’s unemployment rate at 4.7% remains the country’s lowest followed by Quebec at 5%. Low unemployment rates suggests a tight labor market and here at Eagle, the challenge to meet our clients’ demands means we need to use all tools at our disposal to reach an often “passive” candidate pool who in turn, have the luxury of picking and choosing which opportunities to pursue.

With all this in mind, BC continues to be an exceptional place to be if you are working in the IT/IM sector. Jobs remain plentiful in the public and private sectors as organizations pursue their own brand of digital transformation in an effort to better deliver value to their customers. This might be focused internally on projects that help an enterprise better manage their data (Business Intelligence) or in how a firm manages their IS, as either on premise, cloud or a hybrid solution. And because this technology impacts so many organizational domains, it in turn fuels other initiatives needed to support the transformation and this seeds other projects.

What makes these projects so exciting is that the technologies being employed are somewhat newer and experience — or even better, expertise — with that tool immediately puts you in demand. This might involve technologies associated with the Microsoft stack and Azure and feature products like SSIS, SSRS and Power BI. Or, if the project is using open-source utilities, you might be noticing expertise is required with Hadoop, Spark, Scala, Kafka or Hortonworks.

Speaking of software companies and products, BC continues to be a hotbed of established and younger IT product and services companies, perfect for the new grad or experienced Software Engineer. In fact, in a list published November 8th, Deloitte announced the 2019 winners of its Technology Fast 50, Companies-to-Watch and Enterprise Fast 15 Programs and 10 of the top 50 were BC Tech companies (2nd only to Ontario).

BC remains a strong market for IT professionals and the myriad selection of projects that require top resources does not seem to be abating, especially in the lower mainland. The extra work for IT professionals is the never-ending onus to upgrade and keep your skills and experience relevant and that can be a challenge.

Contractor Quick Poll: Do you get distracted by notifications

Fast Company recently published a post by Daniel Rose at Rescuetime where he explains his productivity experiment that lasted a month. Rose typically turns off notifications on his phone as he’s aware of the distractions they bring and how they easily hinder one’s productivity. Still, though, he took a chance, went against his instincts and reversed his productive settings by turning on all notifications.

The first week wasn’t terrible, but it did wake him up to just how many notifications apps send… all the time. By the third week, he felt that the notifications were destroying his work/life balance because there was no escaping anything. In the end, he concludes that notifications don’t just disrupt you, they destroy your ability to focus long-term.

That article inspired this month’s Contractor Quick Poll. IT consultants bill by the hour and clients want to know their money is being spent wisely. More importantly, you juggle multiple tasks while you manage your business, sometimes serve multiple clients, and other times are searching for your next IT gig. Based on the Fast Company article, notifications can slow down those efforts. So now we’re curious, what do you do with all of those notifications being pushed to your phone?

IT Industry News for October 2019

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee, Co-Founder of Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on November 6th, 2019

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000-foot look at events in the ICT industry for October 2019. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of October in previous years …

Five years ago, in October 2014, we saw a new trend, with two public companies both choosing to split into smaller entities.  HP announced it was creating a business service-HP logofocused Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and personal computing & printer company HP Inc.  Symantec also chose to split into two independent public companies, one focused on business and consumer security products, the other on its information management portfolio.  Other interesting news saw IBM pay $1.5 billion to GlobalFoundries so it would take away its money losing semiconductor manufacturing business.  NEST bought competitor Revolv; EMC bought three cloud companies: The Cloudscaling Group, Maginatics and Spanning Cloud Apps; and in Korea, Kakao and Daum merged to form a $2.9 billion internet entity.

October 2015 brought some big deals with the biggest seeing Dell offer $26 billion to buy storage company EMC.  Interestingly an EMC subsidiary, VMWare, was also out shopping, picking up a small email startup, Boxer.  In another deal involving “big bucks”, Western dell logoDigital paid $19 billion for storage competitor Sandisk.  IBM were also writing a big cheque, paying $2 billion in a big data/internet of things play for The Weather Network (minus the TV operations), and IBM also picked up a storage company, Cleversafe.  Cisco paid $522.5 million for cybersecurity firm Lancope; LogMeIn paid $110 million for LastPass; Trend Micro paid $350 million for next generation intrusion prevention systems company HP Tippingpoint; Red Hat picked up deployment task execution and automation company Ansible; Vasco Data Security paid $85 million for solution provider Silanis; and Apple bought a speech processing startup, VocalIQ.  As industries converge it was interesting to see Securitas pay $350 million for Diebold’s US Electronic Security business.

Three years ago, in October 2016, there was not a lot of M&A action but Qualcomm paid $47 billion for NXP Semiconductor.  The only other sizable deal saw Wipro pay $500 million for IT cloud consulting company Appirio.  Google picked up Toronto-based video marketing startup FameBit and Pivot Technology Solutions picked up Ottawa based Teramach.

Cisco logoIn October 2017, Cisco paid $1.9 billion for Broadsoft to improve Cisco’s software capabilities.  The only other significant deal saw Telus beef up its service provider capability with a $250 million purchase of Xavient.

Last year, October 2018 was an interesting month, with some significant M&A activity and the sad passing of yet another tech pioneer, Paul Allen, who co-founded Microsoft with Bill IBM logoGates.  On the M&A front, IBM paid $34 billion for Red Hat to increase its game in the cloud systems arena.  In the red hot cybersecurity space PE company, Thoma Bravo paid $2.1 billion for Imperva.  Twillio also shelled out $2 billion to acquire email company SendGrid rounding out their API offerings. Other deals saw Honeywell bolster its IoT offerings, paying $493 million for Transnorm; Palo Alto Networks is paying $173 million for security startup Redlock; Computacentre paid $70 million for FusionStorm to grow its consulting business in North America; GTT Communications paid $40 million for Access Point to add to its network; and Fortinet paid $18 million for ZoneFox to improve its threat analytics capability.  There was plenty more M&A activity with big names involved.  Some of them included: Google (chatbot company Onwards); Accenture (DAZ systems); DXC (agodesign); Samsung (Zhilabs); CapGemini (June 21); and NTT Data (Sierra Systems).

Which brings us back to the present …

There was plenty of activity in October 2019The economy, while slowing down some, is still quite robust in the US and employment figures around the world are generally positive.  Reports continue to suggest things will weaken in 2020 but the threat of a recession seems reduced, always bearing in mind that the ongoing trade wars are not helping.

There were numerous reports of the skills shortage, in the US and elsewhere in the world.  Couple that with a report suggesting that tech jobs are going to become even more in demand there is a need to guide more students towards tech.

On the M&A side, activity was brisk with the largest deal happening in the robust data Intel logocenter space, Digital Realty paying $8.4 billion for Interxion.  There was also a smaller data centre deal that saw Equinix pay $175 million for 3 data centres from Axtel; and another datacenter deal involving ServerFarm buying SNINES.  Another big dollar deal saw private equity company Thoma Bravo offer $3.4billion for security platform company Sophos.  Big name companies out shopping included Intel buying Pivotal’s Edge Computing platform; Accenture bought Bow & Arrow, a company that helps its clients find new markets;  Microsoft bought Mover, a  company that helps clients move to the cloud; and Telus is paying $700 million for ADT’s Canadian Security Services business.  Some other deals included network company Cienna buying performance and analytics form Centina; Sailpoint paying $37.5 million for two cloud security startups; Tech Data buying DLT Systems; and Trend Micro buying security company Cloud Conformity.

Microsoft logoOther companies making news include Microsoft, who are grappling with an activist employee base contesting their government work; HP Inc. who announced significant layoffs; and Oracle who are going to be on a hiring binge.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month.  The full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the November 2019 industry news in just about a month’s time.

Walk Fast and Smile