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Category Archives: Industry Trends and Insight

IT industry trends and insights, including information about the IT job market across Canada, tech news from around the world plus the latest in technology and current opinions.

Regional Job Market Update for British Columbia (November 2019)

Cameron McCallum By Cameron McCallum,
Regional Vice President at Eagle
Downtown Vancouver Sunset
Downtown Vancouver Sunset” by Magnus Larsson is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

According to Central1, the BC economy continues to be one of the strongest in Canada and a couple of key indicators were quite positive in October. Employment numbers were up 0.6% which represents 15,300 persons or nearly 2.57 million persons seasonally adjusted. Most of this uptick came from the Vancouver Metropolitan Area (28,000 persons) and the news wasn’t so positive in other parts of the province where the natural resources, goods producing and manufacturing sectors all showed weakness. Interestingly, real estate sales in the lower mainland which had showed signs of weakening after government-introduced impediments is showing signs of a rebound, and MLS sales climbed for the 7th time in the past 8th months. BC’s unemployment rate at 4.7% remains the country’s lowest followed by Quebec at 5%. Low unemployment rates suggests a tight labor market and here at Eagle, the challenge to meet our clients’ demands means we need to use all tools at our disposal to reach an often “passive” candidate pool who in turn, have the luxury of picking and choosing which opportunities to pursue.

With all this in mind, BC continues to be an exceptional place to be if you are working in the IT/IM sector. Jobs remain plentiful in the public and private sectors as organizations pursue their own brand of digital transformation in an effort to better deliver value to their customers. This might be focused internally on projects that help an enterprise better manage their data (Business Intelligence) or in how a firm manages there is, as either on premise, cloud or a hybrid solution. And because this technology impacts so many organizational domains, it in turn fuels other initiatives needed to support the transformation and this seeds other projects.

What makes these projects so exciting is that the technologies being employed are somewhat newer and experience — or even better, expertise — with that tool immediately puts you in demand. This might involve technologies associated with the Microsoft stack and Azure and feature products like SSIS, SSRS and Power BI. Or, if the project is using open-source utilities, you might be noticing expertise is required with Hadoop, Spark, Scala, Kafka or Hortonworks.

Speaking of software companies and products, BC continues to be a hotbed of established and younger IT product and services companies, perfect for the new grad or experienced Software Engineer. In fact, in a list published November 8th, Deloitte announced the 2019 winners of its Technology Fast 50, Companies-to-Watch and Enterprise Fast 15 Programs and 10 of the top 50 were BC Tech companies (2nd only to Ontario).

BC remains a strong market for IT professionals and the myriad selection of projects that require top resources does not seem to be abating, especially in the lower mainland. The extra work for IT professionals is the never-ending onus to upgrade and keep your skills and experience relevant and that can be a challenge.

Contractor Quick Poll: Do you get distracted by notifications

Fast Company recently published a post by Daniel Rose at Rescuetime where he explains his productivity experiment that lasted a month. Rose typically turns off notifications on his phone as he’s aware of the distractions they bring and how they easily hinder one’s productivity. Still, though, he took a chance, went against his instincts and reversed his productive settings by turning on all notifications.

The first week wasn’t terrible, but it did wake him up to just how many notifications apps send… all the time. By the third week, he felt that the notifications were destroying his work/life balance because there was no escaping anything. In the end, he concludes that notifications don’t just disrupt you, they destroy your ability to focus long-term.

That article inspired this month’s Contractor Quick Poll. IT consultants bill by the hour and clients want to know their money is being spent wisely. More importantly, you juggle multiple tasks while you manage your business, sometimes serve multiple clients, and other times are searching for your next IT gig. Based on the Fast Company article, notifications can slow down those efforts. So now we’re curious, what do you do with all of those notifications being pushed to your phone?

IT Industry News for October 2019

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee, Co-Founder of Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on November 6th, 2019

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000-foot look at events in the ICT industry for October 2019. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of October in previous years …

Five years ago, in October 2014, we saw a new trend, with two public companies both choosing to split into smaller entities.  HP announced it was creating a business service-HP logofocused Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and personal computing & printer company HP Inc.  Symantec also chose to split into two independent public companies, one focused on business and consumer security products, the other on its information management portfolio.  Other interesting news saw IBM pay $1.5 billion to GlobalFoundries so it would take away its money losing semiconductor manufacturing business.  NEST bought competitor Revolv; EMC bought three cloud companies: The Cloudscaling Group, Maginatics and Spanning Cloud Apps; and in Korea, Kakao and Daum merged to form a $2.9 billion internet entity.

October 2015 brought some big deals with the biggest seeing Dell offer $26 billion to buy storage company EMC.  Interestingly an EMC subsidiary, VMWare, was also out shopping, picking up a small email startup, Boxer.  In another deal involving “big bucks”, Western dell logoDigital paid $19 billion for storage competitor Sandisk.  IBM were also writing a big cheque, paying $2 billion in a big data/internet of things play for The Weather Network (minus the TV operations), and IBM also picked up a storage company, Cleversafe.  Cisco paid $522.5 million for cybersecurity firm Lancope; LogMeIn paid $110 million for LastPass; Trend Micro paid $350 million for next generation intrusion prevention systems company HP Tippingpoint; Red Hat picked up deployment task execution and automation company Ansible; Vasco Data Security paid $85 million for solution provider Silanis; and Apple bought a speech processing startup, VocalIQ.  As industries converge it was interesting to see Securitas pay $350 million for Diebold’s US Electronic Security business.

Three years ago, in October 2016, there was not a lot of M&A action but Qualcomm paid $47 billion for NXP Semiconductor.  The only other sizable deal saw Wipro pay $500 million for IT cloud consulting company Appirio.  Google picked up Toronto-based video marketing startup FameBit and Pivot Technology Solutions picked up Ottawa based Teramach.

Cisco logoIn October 2017, Cisco paid $1.9 billion for Broadsoft to improve Cisco’s software capabilities.  The only other significant deal saw Telus beef up its service provider capability with a $250 million purchase of Xavient.

Last year, October 2018 was an interesting month, with some significant M&A activity and the sad passing of yet another tech pioneer, Paul Allen, who co-founded Microsoft with Bill IBM logoGates.  On the M&A front, IBM paid $34 billion for Red Hat to increase its game in the cloud systems arena.  In the red hot cybersecurity space PE company, Thoma Bravo paid $2.1 billion for Imperva.  Twillio also shelled out $2 billion to acquire email company SendGrid rounding out their API offerings. Other deals saw Honeywell bolster its IoT offerings, paying $493 million for Transnorm; Palo Alto Networks is paying $173 million for security startup Redlock; Computacentre paid $70 million for FusionStorm to grow its consulting business in North America; GTT Communications paid $40 million for Access Point to add to its network; and Fortinet paid $18 million for ZoneFox to improve its threat analytics capability.  There was plenty more M&A activity with big names involved.  Some of them included: Google (chatbot company Onwards); Accenture (DAZ systems); DXC (agodesign); Samsung (Zhilabs); CapGemini (June 21); and NTT Data (Sierra Systems).

Which brings us back to the present …

There was plenty of activity in October 2019The economy, while slowing down some, is still quite robust in the US and employment figures around the world are generally positive.  Reports continue to suggest things will weaken in 2020 but the threat of a recession seems reduced, always bearing in mind that the ongoing trade wars are not helping.

There were numerous reports of the skills shortage, in the US and elsewhere in the world.  Couple that with a report suggesting that tech jobs are going to become even more in demand there is a need to guide more students towards tech.

On the M&A side, activity was brisk with the largest deal happening in the robust data Intel logocenter space, Digital Realty paying $8.4 billion for Interxion.  There was also a smaller data centre deal that saw Equinix pay $175 million for 3 data centres from Axtel; and another datacenter deal involving ServerFarm buying SNINES.  Another big dollar deal saw private equity company Thoma Bravo offer $3.4billion for security platform company Sophos.  Big name companies out shopping included Intel buying Pivotal’s Edge Computing platform; Accenture bought Bow & Arrow, a company that helps its clients find new markets;  Microsoft bought Mover, a  company that helps clients move to the cloud; and Telus is paying $700 million for ADT’s Canadian Security Services business.  Some other deals included network company Cienna buying performance and analytics form Centina; Sailpoint paying $37.5 million for two cloud security startups; Tech Data buying DLT Systems; and Trend Micro buying security company Cloud Conformity.

Microsoft logoOther companies making news include Microsoft, who are grappling with an activist employee base contesting their government work; HP Inc. who announced significant layoffs; and Oracle who are going to be on a hiring binge.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month.  The full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the November 2019 industry news in just about a month’s time.

Walk Fast and Smile

How AI Will Transform Our Economy by 2030

As artificial intelligence (AI) continues to take the world by storm and blow our minds every day with new innovations, analysts and experts continue to wrap their minds around where our world will be by the end of the next decade. Combined, there are no doubt thousands of books, articles, TED Talks and videos committed to making those predictions.

Noodle.ai is an Enterprise AI company focusing on supply chain and manufacturing. They recently created an infographic bringing together a number of sources, including McKinsey, PWC, Bloomberg and more to summarize experts’ opinions about artificial intelligence by 2030.

The findings are exciting and not surprising. They show that by 2030, AI could bring $13 trillion to the global economy, with 70% of companies taking advantage of it. To answer the question on most people’s minds — will AI steal all of our jobs — the infographic does say that current occupations will be automated and possibly eliminated, but it also believes that 250 to 280 million jobs could be created! Repetitive jobs opportunities will likely decrease and non-repetitive jobs with high digital skills are predicted to rise by 10%. Those who choose to learn the new skills are those who will succeed the most.

Check out all the details, including three steps to ensure your (or your client’s) business is ready to capitalize on AI in the next 10 years.

How AI Will Transform Our Economy by 2030

IT Contracting Trends for the Final Stretch of 2019

Making the switch from a full-time tech employee to an independent contractor is a nerve-racking experience. You wonder if you’re making the right decision in giving up a steady pay cheque and definite work so you can have the freedom and benefits that come with IT contracting. Whether you’re just beginning that journey or are a seasoned veteran, it’s helpful to understand the current trends. If not for your own peace of mind, it helps with career planning.

MBO Partners recently released their State of Independence in America and, not surprisingly, the results are quite positive. Although it only surveys independent contractors in the USA, because of the close proximity and similar business cultures, it is safe to assume we are seeing the same trends in Canada.

Some political or business groups claim that independent workers are only in their positions because they have to be and would prefer, as well as be better off with, a traditional full-time job. According to the research, though, most independent workers in the US are in their positions by choice and are doing well financially. In fact, 81% choose to be full-time independent workers, up from 66% in 2012. There are also another 15 million occasional or side hustle independents in the US. In addition, MBO Partners’ Financial Well Being of Independent Workers explains that independent workers report similar levels of financial well-being to those with traditional jobs, with 77% reporting they are doing okay or living comfortably, compared to 78% of traditional workers.

With these numbers, it is no surprise that overall satisfaction as an independent is increasing. As shown in the chart below, in 2011, only 32% of independent workers in the US reported feeling more secure working independently than at a traditional job. That number rose to 53% this year. Furthermore, the report found that 82% are happier working on their own and 69% believe it has been better on their health.

Percent of Full-Time Independent Workers Who Report Feeling More Secure Working Independently
MBO Partners – Financial Well Being of Independent Workers

More Specifically: IT Contracting in Canada

We know that independent contracting in general can be a great career choice. Specifically, IT contractors in Canada can also take advantage of lucrative opportunities and interesting work, as proven by ITWorld Canada’s CanadianCIO Census 2019.

The report suggests new hiring could be cooling as only 37% of CIOs are planning on increasing headcount, while 44% are keeping it stable, 12% are in a hiring freeze and 4% plan to downsize their IT departments. An IT contractor might interpret this as meaning that new opportunities are on the rise. Because new employees are not being hired, when skills are inevitably needed for a project, the IT contractor gets the call.

Overall, CIOs says that the top skills they’re hiring for today are Big Data/BI/Analytics, Business Analysis and Enterprise Application Development. Of special note for IT contractors, their most difficult skills to contract or outsource (and most in-demand) are AI, Data Analytics, IoT, Mobile Development and Cloud Services.

Contractor Quick Poll Results: Do you have a personal website?

IT contractors need to use every tool at their disposal to get their skills and experience in front of recruiters, all while differentiating themselves from other talented IT contractors. The standard resume, job applications, networking events and LinkedIn connections are extremely important, as is having the right tools to complement them.

As noted, every independent contractor submits resumes to recruiters and hiring managers, and many also leave behind business cards. These all contain contact information, usually a link to a polished LinkedIn profile, and some distinguish themselves with a link to their own personal website.

Personal websites give you the opportunity to summarize your skills, display a personal side, and improve your overall branding. In last month’s contractor quick poll, we set-out to understand how many technology professionals are taking advantage of how easy is to create one. It turns out, only about 20% actually have a website while more than half of the respondents say they don’t have a need for a personal website. Where do you stand on the topic?

Contractor Quick Poll Results: Do you have a personal website?

Top iOS Mobile App Developments Trends for 2020

iPhone
Photo by Koby Kelsey on Unsplash

From the dawn of its creation, the iOS mobile development platform has provided versatile and powerful options for creating stunning apps. One of the reasons for its permanent thriving is the continuous state of flux that encompasses all the latest trends in mobile app development. New iPhones are out on the market each year, including improved hardware that sets the base for innovative mobile app development, year by year. To avoid lagging behind, mobile app development companies must stay on track with the new advancements and find their place in the platform, too. If you are interested in keeping abreast of the latest mobile design trends, here are a few pointers to focus on as we are moving into the year ahead.

UI Design Trends

Each iOS app development project starts with the basic goal to improve user satisfaction, which inherently makes new progress all about UI or the user interface. The user interface must not only improve in appearance but also provide a new level of satisfaction with feature simplicity and information delivery. This is not so simple as Apple puts iPhones and iPads under the microscope each year to perk up the hardware.

A key trend of feature mobile app development on the iOS platform is leaving this focus on aesthetically pleasing apps behind. That doesn’t mean that iOS apps will no longer be beautiful but it does mean that the ease of access to information and the simplicity of use take the number one place. Therefore, iOS apps must be made from scratch or revamped to help users complete tasks in the shortest possible time.

While we are touching upon aesthetics, the blurred borders of new iPhone screens play a major role in future iOS mobile app development. Designers need to find ways to create apps that work well on older phones with prominent edges and on new seamless iPhone models.

laptop
Photo by Daniel Korpai on Unsplash

iOS Animations and Graphics

Animations are an excellent way to attract users and keep their attention in the flow as they navigate through the app features. Animations enable sleek functionality – an aspect of user experience that users are primarily looking for.

How web browser tabs, for instance, look and shift on a smartphone, as well as other aspects that soften the lines between visual appeal and functionality, are important for keeping users pleased with the product.

3D graphics may be more demanding on behalf of the mobile app development team, but rewarding nevertheless because they provide an extra level of dynamism in transferring information to users, reducing the need for physical prototypes and boosting the visual aspect of products. It is important not to overdo 3D graphics as they can slow down loading times.

Gesture-based Navigation

One of the key trends for 2020 is the placement of navigation elements on your end product. A major design principle of navigation in past mobile app development trends was to place as many buttons in the navigation bar so that users have greater visibility of what is available. As the number of functionalities is growing, this approach doesn’t work anymore because the visual appeal gets lost among all those buttons.

Designers are now focusing on a more hidden, intuitive button design, placing the maximum number of buttons on the home screen without distorting aesthetics. Functionalities are still there but are enmeshed in the gesture-based navigation. Features compressed in this way will improve the user interaction with the app and ultimately boost engagement rates – it makes more sense to create iOS products that support a few key features than making it all about endless app possibilities which will impede the smooth use of the home screen.

If you align these iOS app development trends with the design process of past products in order to update them or use them while creating new ones, clients will ultimately reap benefits that haven’t been so important while ago but are essential as we move forward.

About the Author: Michael Kelley

With a background in journalism, Michael’s passion lies in educating audiences in the realm of tech. He is especially intrigued by the world of app development and all associated facets including Android, iOS, blockchain, andd App technology. Michael has spent the last few years working with app agencies to elevate their content strategy and expand his knowledge even further as app development technologies advance. When he’s not typing away at his computer, you can find Michael traveling the globe or taste-testing pizzas in search of the ultimate pie.

Job Market Update Across Canada for October 2019

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee, Co-Founder at Eagle

Here at Eagle we provide job market information on a regular basis, sometimes at a high level across the country and other times looking in more depth at specific markets. This update is a high-level look at the Canadian job market, and the factors influencing it. In previous months we have provided market updates, specific to different markets, which you can find through the links here:

There are a number of indicators that I have used over the years to give an idea of how things are going, one such indicator is the markets. For this purpose, I have focused on the TSX. When I wrote this update in March of this year the TSX was at its low of 16,000 points, and it has been as high as almost 16,900, but as I write this sits at 16,400. This is probably a decent indicator of Canada’s economy… meh! Not booming, not in the doldrums but not setting the world on fire either.

The unemployment rate is an obvious indicator for the job market and the September numbers were quite positive, adding 54,000 jobs with 41,000 of them in Ontario. This saw the unemployment rate drop to 5.5%, which is pretty close to the year’s best rate which was 5.4%.

In the new world of work, one of the factors that will favor the job seeker is a willingness to go where the jobs are. In Canada, the four largest provinces represent close to 90% of the jobs, with Ontario the largest (close to 40%); Quebec (approx. 23%); BC (13.5%) and Alberta (12.5%). BC and Quebec have the lowest unemployment rate in Canada (4.8%), with Newfoundland & Labrador the highest (11.5%); Manitoba (5%); Ontario and Saskatchewan (5.3%). So, when considering where to look for jobs, a province that employs a lot of people and has a relatively low unemployment rate is a good place to look. BC, Quebec and Ontario all fit that bill. Alberta is still struggling because of the hit on the oil and gas sector so their unemployment rate is 6.6%.

One of the big factors affecting the Alberta market is the price of oil. The price of a barrel in Canada is more than $10 a barrel less than on the WTI price (and more than $15 less than Brent). This is due to a number of factors, including that fact that Canada’s only client is the United States. Until there is a clear change that will likely remain a factor in Alberta’s economy. Having said that, there are still opportunities in Alberta, just not the booming demand we saw in the past.

The hot US market has created significant skills shortages and cost increases for companies with large workforces. This has created an opportunity in Canada, where large US companies like Amazon, Facebook, Google etc. are adding to their Canadian presence to tap into the talent up here. We have seen big announcements in Vancouver, Calgary, Montreal and Toronto in recent months and I expect this trend to continue. There has been particular interest in the skilled technology talent here in Canada. Canada is also able to attract skilled immigrant talent easier than the US, whose immigration laws are more prohibitive.

Tech job activity is relatively strong in most markets across Canada, even Calgary, which has not returned to pre-oil crisis levels of activity but is still seeing some demand. This makes sense if you recognize that even at a 6.6% unemployment rate, that probably represents an unemployment rate among professionals and in-demand skills of more like 3.5%.

For a more detailed look at the specific markets across Canada, I suggest you read the linked writeups from Eagle’s Executive team across the country, referenced earlier.

Eagle’s focus is technology professionals and the most in demand areas/skills recently have included: Cloud, Healthcare, Government, Telecom, Banking, CRM, BI and AI; Project Managers, Business Analysts, Change Management, Quality Assurance, Architects, Sys Admins, Full Stack developers, Database Admins and Dev Ops engineers.

In summary, people with tech skills and experience should have little difficulty in finding employment, either contract or perm, for the foreseeable future. A willingness to relocate to the bigger centers will only increase their marketability.

The big unknown in the world today is whether there will be a recession, and if so, how deep will it hit. The trading tensions and regional politics around the world are not helping, but generally I am seeing many indicators that 2020 will be a slower year than 2019. A recession is not in the forecast but forecasters have been wrong before! I don’t believe the election will have a negative impact on jobs, whichever party gets in.

For employers, our advice has not changed, it is a “job seekers market” so it is important to hire quickly! Establish clean hiring practices that move candidates quickly through the hiring process. We are seeing more and more multiple job offers and clients losing talent because they are too slow to make a decision.

Contractor Quick Poll: Will You Subscribe to Disney+?

For a couple years now, Disney has been teasing a streaming service that would rival all other services and give the leading Netflix a serious run for its money. Now, Disney+ is less than a month away and the hype around it is real. Disney is going all in, where for a lower monthly subscription than Netflix, viewers can get access to everything that is Star Wars franchise, the Marvel franchise, Disney classics and everything in between.

As we prepare for colder Winter months that typically include binge watching, we’re asking IT contractors what you think of Disney+ and, more specifically, if you’ll be subscribing. If you are, will you give up any of your current streaming or television services?

IT Industry News for September 2019

Kevin Dee By Kevin Dee, Chairman of the Board at Eagle

This post first appeared on the Eagle Blog on October 10th, 2019

This is my 30,000-foot look at events in the ICT industry for September 2019. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of September in previous years …

Five years ago, September 2014 saw some big deals announced, including Microsoft’s Microsoft logo$2.5 billion purchase of gaming company Minecraft, Lenovo’s $2.1 billion purchase of IBM’s x86 server business and Cognizant’s $2.7 billion purchase of healthcare company, Trizetto Corp.  Hootsuite had an injection of cash and bought two companies, social telephony company Zeetl and social media marketing platform Brightkit.  Google also made two acquisitions: biotech company Lift Labs and desktop polling company Polar. There were plenty more deals announced, including Yahoo’s $8 million purchase of cloud-based document hosting company Bookpad; Cisco’s purchase of private cloud company Metacloud; SAP’s purchase of expense software company Concur; Blackberry’s purchase of virtual identity software startup Movirtu and Red Hat’s purchase of mobile app company FeedHenry.

In September 2015, there was a fair bit of M&A activity but no blockbuster deals.  Microsoft was very active, closing three deals, Adxstudio which provides web-based solutions for ACCENTURE LOGODynamics CRM; app developer Double Labs; and cloud security firm Adallom.  Accenture picked up the cloud services company Cloud Sherpas; IBM added cloud software startup StrongLoop; Netsuite paid $200 million for cloud-based marketing company Bronto Software; and Blackberry paid $425 million for competitor Good Technology.  Hardware company Konica Minolta bought IT Weapons; Qualcomm bought medical device and data management company Capsule Technologies; Networking and storage company Barracuda Networks bought online backup and disaster recovery company Intronis; and Compugen bought some of the assets of another Canadian company Metafore.

September 2016 saw Tech Data pay $2.6 billion for the technology solutions group of HP logoAvnet, and HP made the biggest printer acquisition to date, paying $1.05 Billion for Samsung’s printer business.  Other deals saw Google pay $625 million for Apogee, and restaurant company Subway bought online order taking software company Avanti Commerce.  One investment that caught my eye, in the staffing world saw Accenture invest in crowdtesting company Applause.

Two years ago September 2017 saw Google splash out $1.1 Billion to acquire HTC’s pixel team, strengthening its own smartphone capabilities.  In an interesting move IKEA bought gig economy company TaskRabbit. HPE bought Cloud Technology Partners, presumably to strengthen its capabilities in that area and possibly access new clients.  Finally Edmonton company F12.net bought Vancouver’s ONDeck Systems as it pursues its goal to be a National IT Service Provider.

Last year, there were some big deals in September 2018.  Adobe’s $4.5 million purchase of Marketo was the big deal of the month.  Not a true tech play but Sirius XM paid $3.6 billion for Pandora, and with digital/media/tech convergence it seemed like a fit.  Digital Realty is expanding its data centre footprint with the $1.8 billion purchase of Brazil’s Ascenty.  SS&C paid $1.5 billion for Intralinks.  Vonage paid $300 million for contact centre as a service company NewVoiceMedia; Microsoft added to its AI portfolio, buying Lobe; Intel bought a startup, NetSpeed to help with its IoT chips; Cognizant added to its Salesforce capabilities, buying Advanced Technology Group; Infosys also added Salesforce capability in Europe, buying Fluido; and Slack added an AI driven email client to its portfolio with the purchase of Astro.

Which brings us back to the present …

September 2019 was relatively busy in M&A with Qualcomm’s $3.1 billion acquisition of TDK’s share in a RF joint venture, the largest deal of the month.  There were some big Facebook logonames out shopping in September, with Microsoft buying cloud migration company Movere; Facebook bought Wearables company Ctrl-labs (reputedly for big dollars); HP bought endpoint security company Bromium; Western Digital bought Kazan Networks; and Github bought developer tool Semmie.  Commvault paid $225 million for cloud software company Hevig and there were a few more smaller deals.

Other companies in the news included YouTube who reached a $170 million settlement related to protection and privacy for children; Kik interactive shut down its messaging service; and DoorDash became the latest cyber breach casualty.

The jobs numbers were optimistic in Canada, and the US also had good jobs news although the ongoing trade war and potential impeachment have put a negative spin on some of the reports coming out.

That’s what caught my eye over the last month.  The full edition will be available soon on the Eagle website.  Hope this was useful and I’ll be back with the October 2019 industry news in just about a month’s time.

Walk Fast and Smile