Talent Development Centre

All posts by Crystal Nicol

Simple Tips to Lighten the Mood in a Job Interview

Simple Tips to Lighten the Mood in a Job Interview

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Director of Delivery, Strategy and Development at Eagle

Job interviews can be a nerve-wracking experience and a struggle for most people. Wouldn’t it be nice to head into an interview knowing that you can control the mood of the interview? Here are some tips and suggestions to not only make a great impression but to also help you lighten the mood of the interview.

First and foremost, smiling is the one thing that can make the most difference in an interview. Even if you aren’t feeling happy, simply smiling can brighten your mood and your tone. Walk into the office and into the interview room with a smile on your face. It will start your interview off on the right foot. You will come across as confident and positive.

You should always focus on demonstrating a positive, friendly attitude when speaking to a potential employer, client or recruiter. Employers want to hire people that appear positive and someone who would likely get along with their team members and clients.

Find ways to incorporate humour into your interview, but use it sparingly. Don’t head into an interview telling jokes but rather use real life examples. Balance your humor with statements and examples that paint the picture that you’re a smart, dynamic, results-driven team player. Humour is part of your professional image so don’t lay it on too strong and don’t neglect your other professional attributes. Read your audience and follow your interviewer’s lead. Pay attention to cues. How does the interviewer react to your humor? You don’t want it to ever feel awkward or unprofessional. Practice your humor before the interview. Decide which stories you want to tell and practice it on your family or your friends, or even the neighbour. If they don’t laugh then try a different approach. Remember, if it isn’t natural, don’t try to force it. There are plenty of other great ways to connect.

This video is a great 2-minute discussion on how to lighten the mood in a job interview. Darryle Brown gives some great simple tips to follow:

  1. Relax — if you’re tense in an interview setting it can make the entire atmosphere tense as well. Be on time or early so you can concentrate on your thoughts and the things you want to say before the interview begins
  2. Tell a personal story — preferably something humorous. Something to help lighten the mood that the people within the interview setting will consider appropriate for that particular setting.
  3. Have a sense of humor — if you’re tense it makes it impossible for you to really be able to deliver, relate or connect with the interviewers in the midst of the interview setting.

So remember, it’s important to relax, tell a personal story that can connect with the interviewers and have a sense of humor so that you’re able to win them over and lighten the mood in an interview setting.

The Difference Between a Recruiter and Client Interview

The Difference Between a Recruiter and Client Interview

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Director of Delivery, Strategy and Development at Eagle

I often get questions from consultants asking me, “What’s the difference between my interview with a recruiter and the interview with the client (hiring manager)” or “Why do I need to meet with you if I’m also meeting with the hiring manager?” There is a real difference between the recruiter interview and the hiring manager interview, and they each have their importance. Remember, the recruiter is a third-party individual who is working with the client company to go out into the market and find the best candidates possible for that client company’s position. The hiring manager is someone who actually works directly at the client company seeking to fill the position.

A recruiter is requested to use their searching expertise to go out into the industry and find and qualify the best candidate possible who specifically fit a set of requirements provided by the hiring manager. They’re really focusing in on skills and requirements and the job fit. It’s the hiring manager who will take this candidate from the recruiter and then determine if the candidate’s qualifications are suitable for the open position, the team fit, the company’s culture, the company’s core values, etc.

An interview with the recruiter is important. In this interview they will ask you questions to help them determine if you have the specific skills required for the open position. The recruiter wants to set you up for success in your future role so they are going to look deep into your work experience and try to understand both your strengths and weaknesses. Interviewing with the recruiter is also good practice. As per this SparkHire post, during this interview, the recruiter will also coach you and help you prepare for your interview with the hiring manager. They will provide you with useful tips throughout the hiring process, such as appropriate dress, resume format, and handling gaps in employment. They can also provide advice on when it’s appropriate to ask questions about things such as salary and benefits. Your best bet is to look at your interview and conversations with the recruiter as more of a training advantage and a way to learn inside information on the job and hiring manager beforehand.

During the interview with a hiring manager, the hiring manager will ask you questions to determine if your experience would be beneficial not only to the position but to the company as well. The hiring manager is the person who defined the scope of work, including the tasks and responsibilities, and the requirements of the role. They also have the bigger picture and understand the goals and milestones that go along with this role. The hiring manager has the insight into the company and is more likely to assess your skills to see if your skill set would align to other projects or departments in the company, along with this position. They are also asking the candidate questions to determine the team and culture fit. It is the hiring manager who makes the decision over whether or not to hire the candidate.

Remember, it’s important to create a good relationship with your recruiter. A good recruiter is an added benefit to your job searching. If this particular opportunity didn’t work out and if you’ve made a good impression, the recruiter will work with you on future positions, increasing your options.

Why Recruiters Ask You to “Rewrite Your Resume” for an RFP Response

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Why Recruiters Ask You to "Rewrite Your Resume" for an RFP ResponseI was recently at a networking event and overheard IT contractors discussing how their staffing agency was having them basically rewrite their resume for an RFP response and they couldn’t understand why they were having them do all of the work. There was mutual agreement around the group that they’ve all experienced this and that they weren’t happy about it. I thought that was a great time to introduce myself and apologize for interrupting, but I couldn’t help but overhear their topic.

I asked them if their agency educated them on why they require the information they were asking for. All of them explained that they were simply sent a set of instructions and were told that they had to “send everything back” before the deadline. I took some time to discuss the reasons to them and after a lot of back and forth questions and answers, they understood the importance.

Remember, you, as the consultant, are the person doing the job every day. Between yourself and your recruiter, you are the only one who knows what you did, how you did it, in what context, with whom, what tools were used, etc. The last thing we want to do as an agency is guess or assume your experience. This is why your recruiter comes back to you to ask you to update your resume with the details. Yes, they can help you put your thoughts together but they need you for the details.

After discussing why it’s important to have a “federal government” formatted resume with the group consultants, I sent them this Talent Development Centre post I wrote a year and a half ago. It is a great starting point when any consultant is getting ready to respond to a Federal Government RFP.

Land More Jobs by Building a Relationship with Your Recruiter

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

“Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success.” - Paul J. MeyerWhen you’re an IT contractor, working with recruiters is inevitable in your career, so maintaining a strong candidate/recruiter relationship should be top priority. Having an honest, open and trusting relationship with your recruiter is beneficial as you make major decisions throughout your career.  Just as every strong relationship has give-and-take, so is the one between the job seekers and the recruiters. Recruiters provide expertise, industry knowledge, industry contacts and job leads. They can also provide tips and guidance to improve your chances and direct you to the best job opportunities for you. So what’s the role of the IT contractor as the job seeker?

First, you need to help recruiters find you so you can do your part to build relationships with them. It is a known fact that more senior recruiters have an easily accessible pool of highly qualified candidates. These are people in their network that they often refer to first when they are recruiting for a job opportunity. If you’re not in that pool then you’re making your job search a lot more difficult. The internet and social media are swimming with candidates who are constantly applying to positions and you need make sure you are standing in front of the competition. So, start by building your social media presence including LinkedIn, Twitter and any local boards. Recruiters often use job boards and social media to find their candidates so make it easy for them to find you. If you get unsolicited calls or emails from recruiters, take them and respond. If the job opportunity is not what you’re looking for, then the best advice is help them with their search by recommending people you know who are a fit. Recruiters remember candidates who are helpful, so it’s the perfect way to start building a relationship.

Another way to ensure you are building a strong relationship with your recruiters is to have conversations with recruiters in real-time. Meet your recruiters face-to-face whenever possible. Provide them with regular updates on your status and any exciting projects you are working on. Also, put in an effort to understand their business, how recruiting works, their recruiting cycle timelines and how you fit into that scenario. It is also important to gain expectations in the beginning. Having this general understanding can help you figure out which relationships to prioritize. You would want to prioritize recruiters who specialize in what you do.

Developing a relationship with recruiters benefits your future job search. Even if you aren’t immediately looking for a new job or if a particular job opportunity isn’t quite right for you, it’s worth it to find out more and use that time to develop that relationship. Recruiters are often the link to many potential employers. They know what’s happening internally at these companies and before most, know where the next vacancy will be. So always welcome opportunities to speak to recruiters.  Keep an open mind and you might be pleasantly surprised.

“Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success.” – Paul J. Meyer

The Benefits of Working Remotely for IT Contractors and their Clients

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Are you looking for a way to improve your work/life balance? Or are you looking for ways to increase your productivity and lower the number of unpaid sick days you have to take? Then maybe the introduction of remote work should be considered. Each day, more and more independent contractors are joining the “working from home” bandwagon.

The reality is that commuters face delays on a regular basis. Whether it’s because buses are late, trains are delayed or cancelled or there is congestion on the roads, it causes our commute times to double or even triple in length. This is one of the strongest reasons why more IT professionals are implementing flexible working schedules and working from home on client projects.

We all know commuting can often be time consuming, stressful and expensive. The modern business model includes more flexibility for their workers. Companies are providing their employees with an incentive to work from home a certain number of days each week, which allows the workers to avoid long commutes and is saving them the transportation costs. So why not do the same for yourself?

In this technological age, even educators are paving the way to learn from home. Students often have the option to listen to seminars remotely or take quizzes online from the comfort of their home. And even though they are doing a large majority of the work from home, they are still successfully graduating, proving that people can be successful from wherever they work.

Many of your clients and their employees are already on board with this way of thinking. An article from WomensPost.ca shows that a 2017 FlexJobs study of 5,500 people found that a work-life balance was critical to the productivity and success of a company. Out of all the survey respondents, 62 percent said they have left or considered leaving a job because of the lack of work flexibility. An even higher response of 66 percent said they were more productive working from a home office as there were less interruptions from coworkers, fewer distractions, less commuter stress, and they were removed from any office politics.

So will you be more productive when working remotely? You’ll be able to work (and therefore bill) extra hours in the time you’re not commuting. The better work-life balance also means you are less likely to get ill in the first place because stress levels are typically lower. And since you are not commuting, you’ll find more time for your activities, such as going to the gym or spending more quality time with your family. According to an article from the Telegraph, a study by Canada Life found that home workers took fewer sick days compared to those based in the office. The study found that employees working in an office took on average 3.1 sick days last year, whilst homeworkers only took 1.8 sick days and employees who have a cold or are mildly sick can still get work done at home, while office workers are more inclined to take the entire day off to avoid leaving the comfort of their home.

There are, of course, some challenges in working from home:

  1. First of all, the job itself must have the necessary tools to allow for remote work.
  2. Secondly, you must be independent and self-directed in order to be productive while working without guidance.
  3. Thirdly, trust is a big factor for this. If there is no trust between you and your client, then they will begin questioning your timesheets and you will lose out on future references.

Personally, I think a mix of both models is best. One in which you work from home on a certain day or days, but otherwise spend time at the client site to connect with the employees and managers for face-to-face meetings and collaboration. Even one or two days out of the work week spent working remotely does wonders for your mental health, morale, and productivity.

The world of work is dramatically changing. In a competitive world, flexible working schedules are creating healthier and happier workers and increasing productivity. The evidence so far suggests that working remotely benefits clients just as much as it benefits their independent contractors.

Avoiding Networking Events? These Are Some Benefits You Could Be Missing Out On

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Networking is the interaction of people exchanging information and developing contacts, especially to further one’s career. It’s the art of creating and strengthening mutually beneficial relationships over time and is often said to be critical for professional growth and business development.

Most often networking events are free. It’s full of like-minded people that you can work with or learn from in some way, including peers, industry associations, business groups, and even personal contacts. Networking events can range from trade shows or conferences to social gatherings. A Google search will most likely reveal an abundance of networking events in your area for you to connect with business people. There are also plenty of opportunities to network online, like LinkedIn, which are particularly useful for business networking.

By attending a networking event you are opening the doors to a room full of opportunities, not just a room full of people. It’s a chance for you to meet business owners and influential people all together in one environment, many of which you may not otherwise meet.

Some of the rewarding benefits of attending a networking event include:

  1. Branding and Marketing Yourself– It’s important to be visible and get noticed at these events. Networking will help you become a familiar face in the community and a top of the mind person regarding your area of expertise. Use these events to demonstrate that you’re passionate and knowledgeable about your craft.
  2. Building Business – By expanding your network and meeting new contacts you acquire new customers and suppliers and explain and grow your business. Fellow businesses know your name and what you’re about. One of the greatest benefits of networking is that it can generate leads and referrals.
  3. Gaining Industry Knowledge –Networking events allow you to exchange the latest industry information and any developments. It also opens the doors to discussing best business practices, guidance from experienced peers, and advice on how to avoid challenges and pitfalls.
  4. Connecting with Industry Experts –These events provide you with an opportunity to meet with some of the biggest influencers in the industry and create connections with these monumental leaders.
  5. Personal and Professional Development –By attending networking events you have the opportunity to be coached indirectly by others and learn new skills to enhance your own professional development. By listening to others, sharing ideas in discussions, or even asking for feedback and advice, it allows you to expand your knowledge and helps you to see things from a different perspective.
  6. Uncovering Opportunities –Attending a networking event could mean meeting your new business partner, dream employer, life-altering mentor, or even a like-minded person who you can bounce ideas off of. It can be the key moment that leads to many opportunities that you otherwise may not have been presented.
  7. Socializing/Mingling –Remember, networking should be fun! It isn’t all work and no play. Let your hair down, relax, and just shoot the breeze with like-minded individuals. It’s a place for you to be social in your industry and community. And who knows, you might just create some positive outcomes for your business.

Keep in mind that you’re marketing your business and yourself and best of all you’re creating connections. These connections become your own personal network. In today’s day and age, no matter what tools or technology you use, your network is priceless. These are the people that will help make your career a success.

Epic: The Best Way for IT Contractors to be Competitive in the Health Industry

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Should you become Epic certified? Given the increased demand in Canada and limited number of Canadian IT contractors with the certification — absolutely!

We are seeing a growing number of Epic implementations pop-up across healthcare facilities and academic medical centers with an increased demand for Epic consultants, especially ones that are Epic certified. But what exactly is Epic and why has it quickly become one of the largest providers of health information technology?

Epic Systems has a reputation as a technological leader allowing hospitals and health systems to access, organize, store, and share electronic medical records. The support functions of Epic’s applications are related to patient care, including registration and scheduling, clinical systems for doctors, nurses, emergency personnel, and other care providers, systems for lab technologists, pharmacists, and radiologists, and billing systems for insurers.

TechTarget says Epic Systems’ products and services integrate across a variety of settings and functions. Here are some of the company’s prominent products and services:

  • EpicCare, the core EHR product, is tailored for physicians and organizations and focuses on clinical care, decision support and streamlined processes.
  • MyChartprovides patient engagement features, including family health information.
  • Healthy Planetuses data interoperability to boost population health management efforts.
  • Revenue cycle managementsoftware helps handle patient claims and billing.
  • Tapestryaddresses managed care activities.
  • Mobile interfaces – including Haiku for smartphones, Canto for tablets and Limerick for the Apple Watch – aid patient care via mobile devices.

Epic states that 190 million people across the world use its technology. Meanwhile, Forbes has estimated that at least 40% of the U.S. population has medical data stored on an Epic electronic health record (EHR), and Epic’s clients include some of the biggest names in healthcare.

KLAS Research concluded in 2017 that Epic had the largest EHR market share in acute care hospitals at 25.8%. Epic’s top competitor, Cerner Corp., took 24.6% of the market, revealing the close tug of war between the two companies for customers.

There has been a lot of interest lately in the IT consulting industry around becoming an Epic consultant. The demand for these consultants is at an all-time high and Epic Systems’ success has proven that the demand will only increase.

One thing that all Epic consultants should consider is becoming Epic certified.

Epic certifications are highly valued by many organizations and can be the key to a successful career in the healthcare IT field. Epic Certified consultants are currently in high demand.

It is very difficult to become Epic certified, but extremely valuable once you receive it. A certification is awarded when Epic Systems has deemed you proficient within a given module.  If you are not directly employed by Epic then you will need sponsorship from a hospital going through an Epic implementation. Epic does not allow individuals to apply for ad hoc certification. The only other method of receiving Epic certification is to be hired directly by Epic Systems.

There are numerous different modules in which one can become certified, such as:

  • ASAP – Emergency Room
  • Beacon – Medical Oncology
  • Cadence – Scheduling and Tracking Patient Appointments
  • EpicCare Ambulatory/Inpatient: Clinical Documentation, Order Entry, E-Prescribing
  • Kaleidoscope – Ophthalmology
  • Cupid – Cardiology
  • OpTime/Anesthesia – Scheduling and Documentation for Surgical Procedures
  • Stork – Obstetrics
  • Prelude/ADT – Patient Registration System
  • Radiant – Radiology
  • Willow (Inpatient and/or Outpatient) – Pharmacy

Epic requires those who are working on an implementation to be certified. If sponsorship through the system you currently work for is not an option, you can try to get hired by an outside health system to become Epic certified. After completion of the training and a hands on mock implementation process you must pass a proficiency test in order to receive the certification. Note that the only location in which one can receive Epic certification is at Epic Systems headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin.

One thing to keep in mind when looking to get certified is that the process takes varying amounts of time, depending on which module you are receiving certification for. As a result, certification timelines can be somewhat unpredictable.

We are now seeing implementation in Canada and a strong demand for Epic consultants in Ontario. In July 2017, Epic rolled out its first end-to-end implementation in Canada at Mackenzie Health, an Ontario-based health care provider that serves over 500,000 patients. Other Canadian facilities use parts of Epic’s family of software. For example, the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario uses Epic for its patient portal. However, Mackenzie represents the first time a Canadian health care provider has installed the full gamut of Epic tools, covering everything from lab work to cardiology to scheduling.

If you’ve been looking for the “next big thing” to learn in order to remain competitive, Epic is it. It may take some extra work, but it will lead you to be one of the first and few to earn this certification in Canada, immediately making you more marketable to recruiters nation-wide.

Building Your Resume to Respond to Government Matrices

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Building Your Resume to Respond to Government MatricesDeciding to move into public sector IT contracting? One of the biggest challenges a contractor faces is getting their resume ready to respond to large RFPs and extensive government matrices.

Here are some guidelines to help with the process:

  1. You must have a detailed PROJECT description for every position you list in the resume. The project description should include:
    • The project type (transformation, migration, implementation, etc.) along with any main systems or main technologies used.
    • Describe what the goals/objectives are of that project. If applicable, discuss any project successes/failures
    • What was the team size?
    • What was the project budget?
    • Any other relevant information that can help to explain and understand the project.
  1. When you list your work experience, be sure to include the following information for each position:
    • Job Title (including the level)
    • Employer’s name and city
    • Duties and accomplishments
    • Supervisor’s name and phone number (this is particularly good to have when an RFP requests a reference for each project listed in the matrix)
    • Start and end dates (month AND year)
  1. It is often a requirement of an RFP response that you send supporting documentation, including proof of education, certifications or security clearance. It is always a good idea to keep a scanned copy of these documents ready to send if necessary.
  2. Organize your resume information. You may want to consider sub-headings for different flavors of your resume. This will allow you to add bullets to your resume easily for targeted matrix responses or remove bullet points or sub-headings from your resume if the experience is not relevant to that particular job posting.
  3. You should never submit a resume to a job posting without updating the responsibilities section of your resume. It is important that you demonstrate that you are qualified for the role and gear your resume updates toward demonstrating this. Review the qualifications of the job posting/matrix for the position you are targeting. By reviewing this it allows you to better understand which of your qualifications you should emphasize and elaborate on in the resume. Matrices actually provide a major competitive advantage in a job search because the client reveals exactly what they are looking for. Go through the matrix, item by item, and highlight all the relevant experience in your resume. If more detail is needed, tailor your experience in your resume and explain how you meet each requirement.
  4. Keywords, keywords, keywords. Look for Keywords, such as repeated verbs or technical terminologies that are listed in the job posting or matrix. Once you have identified these words then use them in your resume and more importantly provide proof that you have the experience by elaborating on the context of how you gained the experience. A good way to do this is to use numbers, provide examples and focus on the outcome of your activities to emphasize results.
  5. Update job titles frequently. You may need to change your job titles to better fit the job description, such as changing “Project Producer” to “Project Manager” or “Data Scientist” in a private-sector job to “Data Architect.”
  6. Go long. Federal resumes are always longer. Use as many pages as needed to provide a thorough review of your work and education. Be detailed and remember, you’re using your updated resume to make your case and prove that you’re the best fit for this job.  That being said, carefully open with your key qualifications and avoid losing your reader/qualifiers. You could also add a profile statement or qualifications summary to the top of your resume to highlight your most noteworthy and relevant accomplishments.
  7. Proof read your resume. Similar to other resumes, editing and reviewing is important. Not only are you outlining your qualifications but you are also submitting a writing sample. Proof read and edit the resume at least 3 times before submitting your resume for a job posting.

Use SMARTer Goals to Boost Your Career in 2018

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

Welcome 2018!! Yes, a new year is here! It’s the perfect time to set new and exciting goals. As we all know from experience, making a New Year’s resolution is easy. Sticking with it and actually achieving your goal is hard – very hard. Unfortunately, only about 8 percent of us who set goals achieve them. But the good news is that research shows people who make resolutions are 10 times more likely to change their behavior than those who never commit. Why do we find it so difficult to stick our resolutions/goals? It’s probably because the resolution wasn’t S.M.A.R.T. In order for goal setting to be effective you need to understand how to write S.M.A.R.T. goals. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Timely.

  • Specific: What specifically do you want to accomplish? For this step you can ask yourself the 5 W’s – who, what, where, when and why.
  • Measurable: What will it look like if you achieve your objective? How will you know when you’ve reached this goal? We need to know where the finish line is and when we have completed the goal. The answer to this goal must be a true or false, a yes or a no or a specific number.
  • Attainable: Can you realistically reach this goal? Remember, the whole point of a goal is to be challenged and set a goal that will push you, but it shouldn’t be impossible.
  • Relevant: The goal must fit into the overall reason you are doing this. This plays along with “why” you are setting this goal or “why” you want to obtain this goal.
  • Timely: What is your deadline? All objectives need a timeline, which will hold accountability to your actions and progress.

Check out this video for a more detailed discussion on setting your S.M.A.R.T. goals…

How to Prepare for a Job Interview

Crystal Nicol By Crystal Nicol,
Delivery Manager, Eastern Canada at Eagle

How to Prepare for a Job InterviewMaking it to the interview stage in the job search process is exciting and stressful at the same time. It means you’ve been shortlisted and the chances of you getting the job have increased; however, a blown interview destroys those chances together.

Remember when you are invited for an interview, the client already thinks you have the right qualifications for the job based on your resume. You need prepare properly so you can demonstrate these qualifications in the interview and back-up what’s in your resume. Here are a few simple ways you can prepare and significantly increase your chances of winning that job.

Before a Job Interview or Phone screen

  • Research the company’s website and find out useful company information. Extend that search to social media and investigate LinkedIn profiles, especially of the person who is interviewing you. Glassdoor may also reveal company’s specific interview process. Understand the company’s mission and try to find a way to work your knowledge of it into your responses.
  • Prepare questions in advance to discuss during or at the end of the interview. We always want to impress a recruiter or a hiring manager so prepare questions that demonstrate your knowledge and interest the company. Since you have already been looking into the company and looking on the LinkedIn profile of the hiring manager you can start by saying, “I did some research on the company and saw that you have worked at this company for <# OF YEARS>. What is your favorite thing about the company? How did your role evolve? This gives you a chance to build a rapport with the interviewer and the company.
  • Prepare a few interesting facts that you learned about the company through your research. Perhaps the company has won some awards that are important to you or their top-line company objectives/goals. Are they active in the community? What is their company story? Be prepared to discuss these facts if you are asked what you know about the company.
  • Convey in all of your answers how you were successful in your previous jobs. To do this you must provide concrete examples of how you succeeded. Instead of saying, “I was often told I was the one project manager that saved the company money” you could say, “I was able to decrease the budget by 20% saving the company $2M over the first 6 months of the project.”
  • Remember, quite often, a hiring manager will hire someone with the likeability factor. If there are 2 technically strong candidates in the running, the candidate that demonstrated a higher likability factor will likely be the candidate to get the job. They are always looking for someone who is the right FIT for the role. You need to connect with the interviewer. You can do this by being confident and try to interact as if you are already working together. Smile often, avoid any nervous gestures (easier said than done), maintain eye contact and actively listen to the interviewer. The key is that you don’t get too comfortable but be natural and try to have a great conversation by being yourself.
  • Show enthusiasm. Show them that you really want this role. Give them examples of why you are excited for this role. For example, “I am so excited about this role because it give me exposure to working within an AGILE environment and I want to put my SCRUM certification to good use.”

Other Interview Tips

In addition to these preparation tips, always remember these basic interview skills that will ensure you appear professional:

  • Dress for success – strong presentation
  • Always give a firm handshake
  • Make consistent eye contact
  • Make sure you answers are concise and thoughtful, but always relevant to the questions asked (don’t go off track, stay focused).

After you have completed the interview it is always imperative to follow up with a Thank You email. This allows to you maintain interaction with the interviewer, provide any additional information and reiterate your interest/excitement in the role. Check out this helpful link for some additional tips on writing the “Job Interview Thank You Email”.